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Ford is using Microsoft’s HoloLens to design cars in augmented reality - The Verge
Ford is using Microsoft's HoloLens headset to let designers quickly model out changes to cars, trucks, and SUVs in augmented reality. This allows designers to see the changes on top of an existing physical vehicle, instead of the traditional clay model approach to car design.
engineering  hololens  design  ford  augmentedreality  microsoft 
yesterday by jorgebarba
Ben Kamens, Breaking down Amazon's mega dropdown
he hover effects on Amazon’s big ‘ole “Shop by Department” mega dropdown are super fast. Look'it how quick each submenu fills in as your mouse moves down the list:


image

It’s instant. I got nerd sniped by this. Most dropdown menus have to include a bit of a delay when activating submenus. Here’s an old Khan Academy dropdown as an example:

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See the delay? You need that, because otherwise when you try to move your mouse from the main menu to the submenu, the submenu will disappear out from under you like some sort of sick, unwinnable game of whack-a-mole. Enjoy this example from bootstrap’s dropdown menus:

image
I love bootstrap, don’t get it twisted. Just a good example of submenu frustration.


How did Amazon get away without using a delay?

It’s easy to move the cursor from Amazon’s main dropdown to its submenus. You won’t run into the bootstrap bug. They get away with this by detecting the direction of the cursor’s path.

image
If the cursor moves into the blue triangle the currently displayed submenu will stay open for just a bit longer.

At every position of the cursor you can picture a triangle between the current mouse position and the upper and lower right corners of the dropdown menu. If the next mouse position is within that triangle, the user is probably moving their cursor into the currently displayed submenu. Amazon uses this for a nice effect. As long as the cursor stays within that blue triangle the current submenu will stay open. It doesn’t matter if the cursor hovers over “Appstore for Android” momentarily – the user is probably heading toward “Learn more about Cloud Drive.”

And if the cursor goes outside of the blue triangle, they instantly switch the submenu, giving it a really responsive feel.

So if you’re as geeky as me and think something this trivial is cool, I made a jQuery plugin that fires events when detecting this sort of directional menu aiming: jQuery-menu-aim. We’re using it in the new Khan Academy “Learn” menu:

image

I think it feels snappy. I’m not ashamed to copy Amazon. I’m sure this problem was solved years and years ago, forgotten, rediscovered, solved again, forgotten, rediscovered, solved again.

If anyone else on the planet ends up finding a use for jQuery-menu-aim, I’d be grateful to know what you think.

Thanks go to Ben Alpert for helping me understand the linear algebra / cross-product magic Amazon uses to detect movement inside the “blue triangle.” I ended up going w/ a cruder slope-based approach, mostly b/c I’ve lost all intuitive understanding of linear algebra. Sad. Need to watch more KA videos.
design  engineering  review 
yesterday by HM0880
Charles Proteus Steinmetz - Wikipedia
Charles Proteus Steinmetz (April 9, 1865 – October 26, 1923; birth-name: Karl August Rudolph Steinmetz) was a German-born American mathematician and electrical engineer and professor at Union College. He fostered the development of alternating current that made possible the expansion of the electric power industry in the United States, formulating mathematical theories for engineers. He made ground-breaking discoveries in the understanding of hysteresis that enabled engineers to design better electromagnetic apparatus equipment including especially electric motors for use in industry.[1][2][a]
engineering  people 
yesterday by HM0880
3D Printed An Introduction to Kinematic Coupling by nickw | Pinshape
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An Introduction to Kinematic Coupling
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Description

Dear Pinshape Users,



For my Pinshape Mechanical Design Contest submission, I have opted to highlight a lesser known and rather underappreciated mechanical concept of kinematic coupling.

My submission is tutorial based and was created to help educate you on the principles of kinematic coupling while also allowing you to be hands-on throughout the process. There are three lessons with varying degrees of difficulty aimed to teach you the theory behind kinematic coupling and to also demonstrate its use in a real world application: optomechanics! The sequence of tutorials also follows the contest’s notion that 3D printing may soon be used to effectively produce end-use parts as advances in additive technologies continue to occur. The attached .PDF manual contains a step by step walk through of each tutorial including educational information, detailed instructions, and assembly photos.



Quick Overview:

What is kinematic coupling? Kinematic coupling is a method of constraining physical objects together to ensure reproducible certainty of location with a high degree of precision. Sound fancy? Well it is! This is precision engineering at its finest and it is utilized in a number of different applications such as robotics, tooling/fixturing, and optomechanics.

Beginner Tutorial: Starting with the basic theory of kinematic coupling you will 3D print and assemble a Maxwell and Kelvin kinematic coupling test structure to help you better understand how these systems work. The two components snap together using magnets while the spheres of one part mate to the varying geometries of the second to physically constrain the pieces together.

Exploded View and Assembly Animation of the Maxwell System

Intermediate Tutorial: Kinematic coupling isn’t just theoretical, the intermediate tutorial will cover its use in a real world application: optomechanics. Here, you will print and assemble a kinematic optic mount that utilizes the Kelvin coupling technique to create rotational movement. These mounts are used in many laser diagnostic research laboratories. Even if you have no plans to build your own optics system (I don’t either…), these are quite neat devices and I recommend building one especially if you’re a mechanical enthusiast.

Animation of the Rotating Optomechanical Mount

Advanced Tutorial: Following the contest’s sentiment that 3D printing is moving closer towards end use applications. I opted to redesign the previous optic mount to be printed on a SLA machine rather than a FDM style printer. This opens up a new world of possibilities with regards to design constraints. If you’re interested in the advantages of stereolithography and its potential for small batch manufacturing, this tutorial is for you.
engineering 
yesterday by HM0880
Salamanca (locomotive) - Wikipedia
Salamanca was the first commercially successful steam locomotive, built in 1812 by Matthew Murray of Holbeck, for the edge railed Middleton Railway between Middleton and Leeds.[1] It was the first to have two cylinders. It was named after the Duke of Wellington's victory at the battle of Salamanca which was fought that same year.

Salamanca

Type and origin
Power type Steam
Builder Fenton, Murray and Wood
Build date 1812
Specifications
Gauge 4 ft 1 in (1,245 mm)
Loco weight 5 tons
Career
Operators Middleton Railway
Salamanca was also the first rack and pinion locomotive, using John Blenkinsop's patented design for rack propulsion. A single rack ran outside the narrow gauge tracks and was engaged by a large cog wheel on the left side of the locomotive. The cog wheel was driven by twin cylinders embedded into the top of the centre-flue boiler. The class was described as having two 8"×20" cylinders, driving the wheels through cranks. The piston crossheads slid in guides, rather than being controlled by a parallel motion linkage like the majority of early locomotives. The engines saw up to twenty years of service.[2]
design  engineering 
yesterday by HM0880
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2 days ago by kcarruthers
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2 days ago by kcarruthers
man page - Wikipedia
NAME
The name of the command or function, followed by a one-line description of what it does.
SYNOPSIS
In the case of a command, a formal description of how to run it and what command line options it takes. For program functions, a list of the parameters the function takes and which header file contains its definition.
DESCRIPTION
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EXAMPLES
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SEE ALSO
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explanation  programming  engineering  documentation  howto  terminal  unix  wiki  reference  cheatsheet  trivia  info-foraging 
2 days ago by nhaliday
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