economic_nationalism   11

What the left can learn from Bannon
August 2017 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett.

I had a chance to chat with Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s chief strategist until he was ousted last week. I met him inside his so-called war room at the White House and, like most visitors, I was struck by the battle plans that lined his den: white posters laying out his goals, listed by priority and ticked off (or not).....But Bannon was different: he had four small TVs covering a range of news, and at the centre was a fifth, single big screen. That was not tuned to Fox but to CNN, a channel Trump has repeatedly criticised and dismissed as showing “fake news”. The reason? Bannon apparently likes to “watch the enemy”; not for him the cosy option of staying inside the rightwing echo chamber......Bannon is one of the most fascinating figures I’ve met....Never mind the fact that he is whip-smart and widely read, what is also striking is that he seems to have a quasi-anthropological understanding of the power of symbols and ways of defining identity, which he manipulates to advance his goals. No, I don’t like his promotion of economic nationalism. And I recoil with horror from the alt-right movement and its racist ideology......But the consistency of his beliefs is undoubtedly powerful, particularly given that most politicians seem to lack principle or passion these days. And I admire the fact that he has a clear sense of strategy and wants to watch and analyse the entire ecosystem, even if parts of it, such as CNN, represent everything he loathes......Nor was I surprised when Bannon told Financial Times reporters that he loves reading the FT (there are numerous photos of him carrying the paper under his arm). .......while much of the mainstream establishment wrings its hands, they should also ask themselves if they can learn some useful lessons from Bannon. I am not for a moment suggesting that the establishment embrace his views. But Bannon’s decision to monitor the entire media ecosystem is striking. As I have written in previous columns, the American media these days tend to be tribal. Some liberal media consumers, for example, were trapped in such an intellectual echo chamber that they barely knew about the impact of the alt-right before they saw footage of the neo-Nazi demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia.If Bannon’s critics want to fight back, they badly need to get out of their cocoon, and start clicking on to Breitbart News, watching Fox, reading message groups on Reddit and listening to rightwing radio hosts such as Glenn Beck. If that is too hard, they could take a look at the conservative commentaries on mindingthecampus.com, a website that explores the culture wars being waged at universities.....if you don’t like what is happening today, you do at least need to understand it.
Stephen_Bannon  Gillian_Tett  Breitbart  bigotry  Donald_Trump  chauvinism  Fox_News  Fox_TV  economic_nationalism  echo_chambers  alt-right  discomforts  right-wing 
august 2017 by jerryking
What if Steve Bannon Is Right? - The New York Times
Timothy Egan AUG. 25, 2017

It turns out that racial resentment was the strongest predictor of whether a voter would flip from supporting a thoughtful, intelligent Democrat to a boorish, mentally unstable Republican. When you say Black Lives Matter, these white voters hear Kill a Cop. When you say diversity in the workplace, they hear special privileges for minorities at the expense of whites.

So, if you still wonder why Trump would give comfort to racists and Hitlerites, look at the reaction of his base this week. While the civilized world was appalled at his remarks after the hate parade in Charlottesville, Va., a majority of Republicans approved of Trump’s response. Approved.

It’s too easy to write all these people off as racists, for that’s exactly what Bannon is counting on. Yes, there’s a genuine hate-cohort in the Republican Party — neo-Nazis, or “clowns and losers,” in Bannon’s terms — of about 10 percent, which is horrifyingly high....... you can’t bang just one drum. Trump has said demonstrably racist things many a time, from his birther obsession to his taco bowl tweet. He still won, “on a straightforward platform of economic nationalism,” as Bannon noted.

“As long as Democrats fail to understand this, they will continue to lose,” he said.
Donald_Trump  economic_nationalism  Democrats  GOP  identity_politics  Timothy_Egan  Stephen_Bannon  racial_resentment 
august 2017 by jerryking
Trump, Archenemy of Truth - The New York Times
As far-fetched as this may sound to any reasonable person, one must always remember that Trump isn’t a reasonable person or even a particularly smart one, which makes him the perfect vessel for Bannon’s pseudo-intellectual vanities.

The day after Bannon spoke, Trump himself came to CPAC and reaffirmed his commitment to this anti-media crusade, parroting Bannon’s language.

First Trump said: “A few days ago I called the fake news the enemy of the people. And they are. They are the enemy of the people.”
xenophobia  Bannon  economic_nationalism  Media  free_press 
february 2017 by staminator
St-Hubert, Rona and new fears of a hollowed-out Quebec Inc. - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
MONTREAL — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 07, 2016

Existing institutions, starting with the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, are increasingly seen as being unable or unwilling to play the gatekeeper role that prevented key businesses from falling into outside hands in the past. The Caisse, which manages investments for the Quebec Pension Plan and other provincial retirement regimes, is much more focused on global opportunities as it seeks the returns it needs to prepare for an onslaught of pensioners.

For former Rona chief executive officer Robert Dutton, that became painfully clear in 2012 when Lowe’s first tabled a hostile bid for the Quebec chain. Speaking out for the first time last week, Mr. Dutton told Radio-Canada that Caisse chief Michael Sabia had always favoured Rona’s sale, but was forced by then Liberal finance minister Raymond Bachand to block the Lowe’s bid in 2012. Mr. Dutton’s ouster and subsequent board changes, he said, were engineered by the Caisse to pave the way for a much richer bid by Lowe’s, a premium made possible by a weak Canadian dollar.

Mr. Sabia has offered a different version of events. In 2012, the Caisse, which owned about 17 per cent of Rona, believed that the Quebec chain could still be a consolidator in the North American home-renovation sector if it boosted its competitiveness. By early 2016, that plan no longer seemed feasible. “Rona was improving, but it was still not well-positioned,” Mr. Sabia said in February.
CDPQ  competitiveness  consolidation  economic_nationalism  gatekeepers  generational_change  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Quebec  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  multinationals  weak_dollar 
april 2016 by jerryking
The African Guyanese community has to find a way to develop strong financial independence
April 8, 2013 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

The African Guyanese community is in deep trouble. The community is always protesting, shot at and sometimes killed by police, with no improvement to their situation. Why is that? Their representatives in the TUC, the majority opposition and ACDA have somehow manoeuvred them into a box of irrelevance, with no obvious way out unless they are willing to recognize/accept that they are flawed in their approach and are willing/able to take the necessary steps to get out.
What is the way out? Find a strategy to develop financial relevance in the community. I can hear the exclamations, “Here Skinner go again!” Well, Skinner knows that people respect education backed with strong financial capabilities. People respect people with strong financial independence. That is not in the community, thus the disrespect and the impotence....There should be an organization in every city, every village, every little community, teaching financial management and wealth generation. Look for cooperative business ventures that can be carried out in the communities. Look at struggling communities like Ituni and Kwakwani. See how we can match them with investors or get them equipped to get bank loans. Regulate Africans lands so that Joint Ventures can be done easily.
entrepreneurship  history  Afro-Guyanese  Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  African_Guyanese_villages  wealth_creation  self-determination  self-employment  self-help  self-reliance  economic_clout  economic_nationalism  strategic_thinking  institutions  institution-building  generational_wealth 
april 2013 by jerryking
A Place Called Heaven_pgs. 82-83
1996 | Cecil Foster

Progress will come only through economic independence, the Chief Justice argues, because only then will Blacks be free of the control of other groups. Only then will they be beyond hoping that some politician will appoint one of them to some top job, even as chief justice. Blacks start having clout only when they take greater pride in their identity and work together, when they stop being distrustful of one another because they, too, might have bought into the negative stereotypes other groups have spread about Africans and descendants. “There is a complete absence of influence in matters that affect us as a community, as a people. An inability to lend a helping hand to brothers and sisters in need." the Chief Justice explains in the interview. Julius Isaac chooses his words carefully. pondering every question and occasionally pausing mid-sentence to reflect on what he is saying. "The last time l was in Toronto. l met a Jamaican fellow who told me that he owns a factory where he employs about 50 West Indians, and l thought that he is a unique individual. That is the sort of thing l am talking about: to have the ability to help and to influence the matters that affect our lives. We are at the mercy of other people in the community. You look around at the way in which the society is organized, and for want of a better word, you realize that it is organized on a tribal basis and that each tribe is vying for economic stability. ,I in order to ensure that matters that concern members of that tribe are disposed of in the most advantageous way. We are not able to do that. That is the nutshell of my thinking."
Part of the problem rests with society and the way it is organized. But Blacks must also take their share of the blame, he says. "We do not have the sharpened, acquisitive instinct. lf it is sharpened, it is in a very marginal way that affects a family or an individual. We haven't been able as a community in Canada to acquire significant pools of capital to put at the disposal of the community for its development. l think that is where the focus should be."
African_Canadians  distrust  disunity  economic_clout  economic_nationalism  strategic_thinking  judges  trustworthiness  ethnic_communities  mindsets  self-reliance  self-determination  capital_formation  capital_accumulation  economic_empowerment 
january 2013 by jerryking
China needs West's energy know-how, not resources
November 16, 2012 | Reuters | Christopher Swan.

A change in tactic could smooth China's path. The country has plenty of its own hydrocarbons and lacks only the know-how to extract them. In fact, at about 36 trillion cubic metres, China's shale gas reserves are estimated by the U.S. government to be 50 per cent larger than those of the United States. Acquiring services and technology companies would help increase domestic output.

Targeting a giant like Halliburton might stir the same sort of resistance China experiences now. There are, however, plenty of smaller rivals that probably wouldn't.
China  CNOOC  Halliburton  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  nationalism  shale_oil  hydraulic_fracturing  backlash  protectionism  economic_nationalism  knowledge 
december 2012 by jerryking
China Toughens Rules for Foreign Companies - WSJ.com
MARCH 17, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by ANDREW BROWNE And
JASON DEAN. Business Sours on China. Foreign Executives Say Beijing
Creates Fresh Barriers; Broadsides, Patent Rules. China's relationship
with foreign companies is starting to sour, as tougher government
policies and intensifying domestic competition combine to make one of
the world's most important markets less friendly to
multinationals....Signs of nationalism are evident in the grooming of
state-owned companies (SOEs) to dominate their industries as "national
champions," often at the expense of private Chinese companies as well as
foreign firms. From airlines to coal mining to dairy products,
government policies are expanding the state's role.
China  protectionism  multinationals  patent_law  economic_nationalism  SOEs  global_champions  state-as-facilitator 
march 2010 by jerryking

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