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The Art of Manliness -- The Art of Anticipation
'...Anticipation is pleasurable tension. Charged expectancy. It is a feeling encapsulated in the desire one feels at the sight of a gift-wrapped box to know what’s in it. Dopamine senses a possible reward, paints a rosy picture of what it might be at its most ideal, and produces the desire to get at it, to experience it firsthand, to find out just how good it might be. -- Once we know what’s in the “box,” dopamine dissipates. -- Thus, while we typically think that what we most want is to get what we, well, want, the most intense current of pleasure actually lies in looking forward to getting what we want. Everyone knows that the anticipation of Christmas is far better than Christmas itself. Similarly, research shows that people enjoy the anticipation of their vacations more than the vacations themselves. In the throes of expectancy, a sense of impending magic builds; we get to contemplate the still-perfect picture of what lies ahead, untainted by the nuanced messiness of reality.'
psychology  dopamine  absurd 
15 days ago by adamcrowe
The Art of Manliness -- Your Life Explained Through Dopamine
'...There’s a bit of a red pill quality to understanding how dopamine operates in your life; once you do, it’s hard not to readily identify when it’s playing a role, so that instead of being unabashedly giddy and hopeful — “This is the thing that’s going to change my life!” — you can get a little demoralized and cynical: “No, I know what’s going on here — dopamine’s just inflaming my brain. This isn’t going to last.” -- But it’s empowering too; now when you encounter friction in some pursuit, you won’t automatically abandon ship, only to repeat the exact same cycle again (“This time is different. This is the thing that will change my life!”). Instead, you’ll know, “I’m not necessarily on the wrong track, I just need to switch to a different source of satisfaction.” -- ...you’ve got to make good times happen in the here and now, but making good times happen is harder in the absence of dopamine; once it dies, it’s thus very easy just to let things drop and drift. To get out of that cycle, you have to be intentional about continuing to do the things you used to do in the presence of dopamine, in its absence. -- ... Lieberman and Long sum up this shift as making the “transition from excitement to enjoyment.” It might also be described as moving from choosing and pursuing to maintaining and building — a pivot we argue represents a major crux of adulthood.'
psychology  dopamine  absurd  securityvsnovelty  OttoRank 
24 days ago by adamcrowe
Athenaeum Review -- The Problem With Happiness by Gary Saul Morson
'...As the philosopher John Rawls pointed out, a society of happiness-seekers would have no reason not to borrow heavily and leave the debt to future generations. If there is nothing larger than us now, why not? Après nous, la faillite (After us, bankruptcy.) What’s more: if the only reason to have children is to make oneself happier, rather than to fulfill a social or moral duty, a lot fewer people will have children. Mounting national debt and a birthrate well below replacement level: that describes Western Europe today rather well.'
rkselectiontheory  decadence  utilitarianism  technocracy  soma  dopamine  happiness  collapse 
6 weeks ago by adamcrowe
How To GET Your Life Back Together - Dopamine Fast - YouTube
A dopamine fast is a full day where you abstain from things that trigger dopamine release.

Reasons for doing this:
1. It starves the "donkey." If we abstain from rewarding things for a time we can pursue actions that provide smaller rewards afterwards because we are no longer full.
2. It prevents masking the pain. The rewarding dopamine releasing things we do normally masks our pain. The dopamine fast makes us aware of our pain and forces us to face it.

A dopamine fast day will often include hours of writing with pen and paper.
dopamine 
8 weeks ago by Styrke
The Book of Life -- There is No Happily Ever After
'...We can never properly be secure, because so long as we are alive, we will be alert to danger and in some way at risk. The only people with full security are the dead; the only people who can be truly at peace are under the ground; cemeteries are the only definitively calm places around. -- There is a certain nobility in coming to accept this fact – and the unending nature of worry in our lives. We should both recognise the intensity of our desire for a happy endpoint and at the same time acknowledge the inbuilt reasons why it cannot be ours. -- We should give up on The Arrival Fallacy, the conviction that there might be such a thing as a destination, in the sense of a stable position beyond which we will no longer suffer, crave and dread. -- The feeling that there must be such a point of arrival begins in childhood, with a longing for certain toys; then the destination shifts, perhaps to love, or career. Other popular destinations include Children and Family, Fame; Retirement or (even) After the Novel is Published. It isn’t that these places don’t exist. It’s just that they aren’t places that we can pull up at, settle in, feel adequately sheltered by and never want to leave again. None of these zones will afford us a sense that we have properly arrived. We will soon enough discover threats and restlessness anew. -- One response is to imagine that we may be craving the wrong things, that we should look elsewhere, perhaps to something more esoteric or high-minded: philosophy or beauty, community or Art. -- But that is just as illusory. It doesn’t matter what goals we have: they will never be enough. Life is a process of replacing one anxiety and one desire with another. No goal spares us renewed goal seeking. The only stable element in our lives is craving: the only destination is the journey. -- What are the implications of fully accepting the Arrival Fallacy? We may still have ambitions, but we’ll have a certain ironic detachment about what is likely to happen when we fulfill them. We’ll know the itch will start up again soon enough. Knowing the Arrival Fallacy, we’ll be subject to illusion, but at least aware of the fact.' -- There is no fate that cannot be surmounted by scorn. ~ Albert Camus
psychology  dopamine  philosophy  absurd  Camus  * 
march 2019 by adamcrowe
Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Science | The Guardian
Multitasking has been found to increase the production of the stress hormone cortisol as well as the fight-or-flight hormone adrenaline, which can overstimulate your brain and cause mental fog or scrambled thinking. Multitasking creates a dopamine-addiction feedback loop, effectively rewarding the brain for losing focus and for constantly searching for external stimulation.
productivity  scary  multitasking  mental  health  dopamine  stress  cortisol  article  social  media  reward  brain 
january 2019 by random
Anonymous Conservative -- News Briefs – 11/19/2018
'America has an exploding suicide epidemic. As you reach the peak of r, you are at maximum dopamine and minimal amygdala-hardening. As you pass over the peak, the beginning of the decline will be hard for a lot of people.'
rkselectiontheory  decadence  dopamine  suicide 
november 2018 by adamcrowe
YouTube -- Paul Joseph Watson: Love is a Mental Illness
The reason you haven't felt it is because it doesn't exist. What you call love was invented by guys like me, to sell nylons. You're born alone and you die alone and this world just drops a bunch of rules on top of you to make you forget those facts. But I never forget. I'm living like there's no tomorrow, because there isn't one. ~ Don Draper
psychology  love  dopamine  soma  addiction  existentialism 
october 2018 by adamcrowe
Creating Users, Not Addicts – Journey Group – Medium
I think it was Bill Joy that pointed out that only the software and illegal drug industries refer to their customers as “users”.
Design  Ethics  Addiction  Psychology  Dopamine 
september 2018 by Membranophonist

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