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Why 4 a.m. Is the Most Productive Hour
August 23, 2016 | WSJ | By Hilary Potkewitz.

Most people who wake up at 4 a.m. do it because they have to—farmers, flight attendants, currency traders and postal workers. Others rise before dawn because they want to......Even though he knows productivity experts say doing email first thing in the morning expends prime mental energy on busywork, Mr. Perry says clearing his inbox curbs his anxiety. “I feel I get a head start on everybody,” he says......Executives have often touted the benefits of an early morning start. Apple chief executive Tim Cook, known for being among first in the office and the last to leave, starts his morning routine at 3:45 a.m. And Sallie Krawcheck, chief executive of Ellevest and former Wall Street executive, has written, “I’m never more productive than at 4 a.m.”

Non-executive early birds aren’t necessarily workaholic. They hope to avoid the distractions of technology and social media. Those who work from home want a jump start on their day before other demands intrude. Some are seeking solitude and quiet.

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A couple of quick questions:
1. When is date night during the week so that the relationship these people are in survives?
2. When are these early birds doing homework with their kids or reviewing for a test?
3. Which evening activities, i.e. school play, etc. are these chaps missing?
4. What business meetings or marketing functions are these obviously fit fellows able to avoid by their schedule without a detriment to their well rounded careers?

It is all a trade off...
distractions  early_risers  focus  productivity  Sallie_Krawcheck  self-care  sleep  solitude  Tim_Cook  tradeoffs 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
George Trower-Subira, author, lecturer
December 16, 2010 | The Inquirer | by JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com

FOR A MAN who spent his life in the often frustrating struggle to win justice for African-Americans, George Russell Trower-Subira embodied the meaning of the Swahili word that he added to his given name.

"Subira" means "patience" in Swahili. And that was one of the main characteristics of George's character.

"He had incredible patience with people," said his brother, Len Trower. "Even people who did unjust things to him, he would forgive them. He would try to rationalize why they did it. Me? I'd be throwing things against the wall."

George Russell Trower-Subira, who grew up in Philadelphia as George Trower and wrote numerous books of self-help advice for African-Americans as George Subira, collapsed and died of a heart attack Sunday while jogging on the track at Penn Wood High School, in East Lansdowne. He was 66 and lived in East Lansdowne.

He was a major influence on the subject of black entrepreneurship through his writings and speeches. His book, "Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America," published in 1980, was the first to tell blacks that what was missing from their drive for equality was success in the economic arena.....George traveled the country expounding these views, and was in demand at schools and conferences as a speaker and teacher of economic values and business development for blacks.

He gained wide recognition for his ideas and was interviewed on the Phil Donahue show, the "Today" show, "Tony Brown's Journal" and the "700 Club," and was written up in Essence, Ebony, Jet and Black Enterprise, among others.
African-Americans  authors  economic_clout  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  obituaries  black_power  conspicuous_consumption  distractions  entertainment  immaturity  pay_attention  self-discipline 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Types Of Distractions Truckers Face On The Road
We all know about the dangers of distracted driving, but truckers may not even recognize a few things that are diverting their attention. Learn about the types of distractions that truckers face on the road.
truckers  driving  distractions 
april 2019 by Adventure_Web
Squirrel? We must zero in on improving our attention management - The Globe and Mail
Here’s what I discovered along the way:

Being distracted isn’t our fault (it’s the way we’re biologically wired).
Deliberately letting our mind wander is one of the best ways to become more creative.
When our attention is at rest, we think about our goals 14 times as much as when we’re focused.
We accomplish our intentions more often by taming distractions ahead of time. A few ways to do this: Use your phone’s greyscale mode, which turns your screen black-and-white and makes apps far less engaging; enable e-mail notifications for VIP contacts only; and have no-phone dinners with your family.
The most significant idea I encountered was a simple one, but with profound implications: The state of our attention determines the state of our lives. The moments in which we’re distracted accumulate – day by day, week by week, year by year – to create a life that feels distracted and overwhelming.

On the other hand, when we focus for longer periods on what’s productive and meaningful – important conversations, big work projects and experiences with loved ones – our lives improve by virtually every measure. We get more done, dive deeper into our experiences and notice more meaning around us, because we process the world with greater intention.
attention_spans  distractions  interruptions  squirrel-like_behaviour 
november 2018 by jerryking
CBT Automotive Network: The Most Common Dealership Workplace Distractions and How to Avoid Them - Brian Solis
Industry publication CBT Automotive Network recently published an article about common workplace distractions at car dealerships, quoting Brian Solis’ thoughts on the subject.
dealerships  distractions  gratification  press  publicity  smartphones  tablets  workplace  brian  solis 
october 2018 by briansolis
The Disconnect
An offline-only digital magazine. Beautiful idea and remarkable execution.
design  distractions 
august 2018 by ft

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