disorder   1275

« earlier    

Feminist cyborg scholar Donna Haraway: ‘The disorder of our era isn’t necessary’ | World news | The Guardian
"The history of philosophy is also a story about real estate.

Driving into Santa Cruz to visit Donna Haraway, I can’t help feeling that I was born too late. The metal sculpture of a donkey standing on Haraway’s front porch, the dogs that scramble to her front door barking when we ring the bell, and the big black rooster strutting in the coop out back – the entire setting evokes an era of freedom and creativity that postwar wealth made possible in northern California.

Here was a counterculture whose language and sensibility the tech industry sometimes adopts, but whose practitioners it has mostly priced out. Haraway, who came to the University of Santa Cruz in 1980 to take up the first tenured professorship in feminist theory in the US, still conveys the sense of a wide-open world.

Haraway was part of an influential cohort of feminist scholars who trained as scientists before turning to the philosophy of science in order to investigate how beliefs about gender shaped the production of knowledge about nature. Her most famous text remains The Cyborg Manifesto, published in 1985. It began with an assignment on feminist strategy for the Socialist Review after the election of Ronald Reagan and grew into an oracular meditation on how cybernetics and digitization had changed what it meant to be male or female – or, really, any kind of person. It gained such a cult following that Hari Kunzru, profiling her for Wired magazine years later, wrote: “To boho twentysomethings, her name has the kind of cachet usually reserved for techno acts or new phenethylamines.”

The cyborg vision of gender as changing and changeable was radically new. Her map of how information technology linked people around the world into new chains of affiliation, exploitation and solidarity feels prescient at a time when an Instagram influencer in Berlin can line the pockets of Silicon Valley executives by using a phone assembled in China that contains cobalt mined in Congo to access a platform moderated by Filipinas.

Haraway’s other most influential text may be an essay that appeared a few years later, on what she called “situated knowledges”. The idea, developed in conversation with feminist philosophers and activists such as Nancy Hartsock, concerns how truth is made. Concrete practices of particular people make truth, Haraway argued. The scientists in a laboratory don’t simply observe or conduct experiments on a cell, for instance, but co-create what a cell is by seeing, measuring, naming and manipulating it. Ideas like these have a long history in American pragmatism. But they became politically explosive during the so-called science wars of the 1990s – a series of public debates among “scientific realists” and “postmodernists” with echoes in controversies about bias and objectivity in academia today.

Haraway’s more recent work has turned to human-animal relations and the climate crisis. She is a capacious yes, and thinker, the kind of leftist feminist who believes that the best thinking is done collectively. She is constantly citing other people, including graduate students, and giving credit to them. A recent documentary about her life and work by the Italian film-maker Fabrizio Terranova, Storytelling for Earthly Survival, captures this sense of commitment, as well as her extraordinary intellectual agility and inventiveness.

At her home in Santa Cruz, we talked about her memories of the science wars and how they speak to our current “post-truth” moment, her views on contemporary climate activism and the Green New Deal, and why play is essential for politics.

We are often told we are living in a time of “post-truth”. Some critics have blamed philosophers like yourself for creating the environment of “relativism” in which “post-truth” flourishes. How do you respond to that?

Our view was never that truth is just a question of which perspective you see it from.

[The philosopher] Bruno [Latour] and I were at a conference together in Brazil once. (Which reminds me: if people want to criticize us, it ought to be for the amount of jet fuel involved in making and spreading these ideas! Not for leading the way to post-truth.)

Anyhow. We were at this conference. It was a bunch of primate field biologists, plus me and Bruno. And Stephen Glickman, a really cool biologist, took us apart privately. He said: “Now, I don’t want to embarrass you. But do you believe in reality?”

We were both kind of shocked by the question. First, we were shocked that it was a question of belief, which is a Protestant question. A confessional question. The idea that reality is a question of belief is a barely secularized legacy of the religious wars. In fact, reality is a matter of worlding and inhabiting. It is a matter of testing the holdingness of things. Do things hold or not?

Take evolution. The notion that you would or would not “believe” in evolution already gives away the game. If you say, “Of course I believe in evolution,” you have lost, because you have entered the semiotics of representationalism – and post-truth, frankly. You have entered an arena where these are all just matters of internal conviction and have nothing to do with the world. You have left the domain of worlding.

The science warriors who attacked us during the science wars were determined to paint us as social constructionists – that all truth is purely socially constructed. And I think we walked into that. We invited those misreadings in a range of ways. We could have been more careful about listening and engaging more slowly. It was all too easy to read us in the way the science warriors did. Then the rightwing took the science wars and ran with it, which eventually helped nourish the whole fake-news discourse.

Your PhD is in biology. How do your scientist colleagues feel about your approach to science?

To this day I know only one or two scientists who like talking this way. And there are good reasons why scientists remain very wary of this kind of language. I belong to the Defend Science movement and in most public circumstances I will speak softly about my own ontological and epistemological commitments. I will use representational language. I will defend less-than-strong objectivity because I think we have to, situationally.

Is that bad faith? Not exactly. It’s related to [what the postcolonial theorist Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak has called] “strategic essentialism”. There is a strategic use to speaking the same idiom as the people that you are sharing the room with. You craft a good-enough idiom so you can work on something together. I go with what we can make happen in the room together. And then we go further tomorrow.

In the struggles around climate change, for example, you have to join with your allies to block the cynical, well-funded, exterminationist machine that is rampant on the Earth. I think my colleagues and I are doing that. We have not shut up, or given up on the apparatus that we developed. But one can foreground and background what is most salient depending on the historical conjuncture.

What do you find most salient at the moment?

What is at the center of my attention are land and water sovereignty struggles, such as those over the Dakota Access pipeline, over coal mining on the Black Mesa plateau, over extractionism everywhere. My attention is centered on the extermination and extinction crises happening at a worldwide level, on human and non-human displacement and homelessness. That’s where my energies are. My feminism is in these other places and corridors.

What kind of political tactics do you see as being most important – for young climate activists, the Green New Deal, etc?

The degree to which people in these occupations play is a crucial part of how they generate a new political imagination, which in turn points to the kind of work that needs to be done. They open up the imagination of something that is not what [the ethnographer] Deborah Bird Rose calls “double death” – extermination, extraction, genocide.

Now, we are facing a world with all three of those things. We are facing the production of systemic homelessness. The way that flowers aren’t blooming at the right time, and so insects can’t feed their babies and can’t travel because the timing is all screwed up, is a kind of forced homelessness. It’s a kind of forced migration, in time and space.

This is also happening in the human world in spades. In regions like the Middle East and Central America, we are seeing forced displacement, some of which is climate migration. The drought in the Northern Triangle countries of Central America [Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador] is driving people off their land.

So it’s not a humanist question. It’s a multi-kind and multi-species question.

What’s so important about play?

Play captures a lot of what goes on in the world. There is a kind of raw opportunism in biology and chemistry, where things work stochastically to form emergent systematicities. It’s not a matter of direct functionality. We need to develop practices for thinking about those forms of activity that are not caught by functionality, those which propose the possible-but-not-yet, or that which is not-yet but still open.

It seems to me that our politics these days require us to give each other the heart to do just that. To figure out how, with each other, we can open up possibilities for what can still be. And we can’t do that in a negative mood. We can’t do that if we do nothing but critique. We need critique; we absolutely need it. But it’s not going to open up the sense of what might yet be. It’s not going to open up the sense of that which is not yet possible but profoundly needed.

The established disorder of our present era is not necessary. It exists. But it’s not necessary."
donnaharaway  2019  anthropocene  climatechange  science  scientism  disorder  greennewdeal  politics  interdependence  families  critique  humanism  multispecies  morethanhuman  displacement  globalwarming  extermination  extinction  extraction  capitalism  genocide  deborahbirdrose  doubledeath  feminism  postmodernism  harikunzru  cyborgmanifesto  philosophy  philosophyofscience  santacruz  technology  affiliation  exploitation  solidarity  situatedknowledge  nancyhartstock  objectivity  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships 
3 days ago by robertogreco
Human society under urgent threat from loss of Earth's natural life | Environment | The Guardian
big problem European CAP common ag policy. as it subsidieses scale and destruction not conservation and harmony.

Scientists reveal one million species at risk of extinction in damning UN report

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/06/uk-urged-to-take-lead-on-biodiversity-as-un-issues-urgent-warning-global-assessment-dasgupta - Ministers announce report on economic case for biodiversity, but activists insist actions, not studies, are needed

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/mar/12/what-is-biodiversity-and-why-does-it-matter-to-us - The air you breathe, the water you drink and the food you eat all rely on biodiversity, but right now it is in crisis – because of us. What does this mean for our future and can we stop it?

Artensterben - https://www.spiegel.de/plus/darum-ist-das-artensterben-bedrohlicher-als-der-klimawandel-a-00000000-0002-0001-0000-000163724182
biodiversity  ecological  collapse  extinction  mass  disorder  climate  change  human  anthropocene  beecolony  insects  herbicide  pesticide  fungicide  environment  CAP  Artensterben 
7 weeks ago by asterisk2a
Alzheimer’s Disease is a ‘Double-Prion Disorder,’ Study Shows | UC San Francisco
Two proteins central to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease act as prions – spreading through tissue like an infection by forcing normal proteins to adopt the same misfolded shape. 
kiru  madcow  prion  disorder  memory  alzheimers  disease  ab  condello  phd  research 
7 weeks ago by xer0x
Accessibility for Vestibular Disorders: How My Temporary Disability Changed My Perspective – A List Apart
by a person who suffered severe vertigo and the effect on their navigation ability - and consequent advice on web design
webdesign  web  design  accessibility  accessible  vestibular  disorder 
8 weeks ago by piperh
Are sexual abuse victims being diagnosed with a mental disorder they don't have? | Life and style | The Guardian
How the psychiatric establishment and healthcare systems misdiagnose and stigmatize incest survivors and roadblock their healing: the damning label of disgnoses. In psychiatry it is common to take years to get an accurate diagnosis.
sexuality  abuse  psychiatry  psychology  mental  health  borderline  personality  disorder  ptsd  trauma  diagnosis  healthcare  insurance  stigma  incest  stereotype  women  19eyz  treatment  children 
march 2019 by csrollyson
Frankétienne, Father of Haitian Letters, Is Busier Than Ever - The New York Times
"Frankétienne has had prophecies of death (his own) and destruction (Haiti’s).

The earthquake that wrecked this country in January 2010? It was foreseen, said Frankétienne, the man known as the father of Haitian letters, in his play “The Trap.” It was written two months before the disaster and depicts two men in a postapocalyptic landscape, now a familiar sight in his Delmas neighborhood here.

“The voice of God spoke to me,” said Frankétienne, 75, later noting he had also long dwelt on the ecological ruin he believes the planet is hurtling toward. As for his death, that will come in nine years, in 2020, he says, at age 84. He is not sick, he says, but he has learned to “listen to the divine music in all of us.”

And so the prolific novelist, poet and painter — often all three in a single work — hears his coda. He is vowing to complete a multivolume memoir “before I leave, physically,” while keeping up an increasingly busy schedule of exhibitions and conferences.

“I am going to talk about everything I have seen from age 5 or 6,” he said recently at his house-cum-museum and gallery. “And stuff that hasn’t happened yet because I am a prophet.”

Eccentric. Abstract. A “spiralist,” who rejects realism and embraces disorder. Frankétienne — he combined his first and last names years ago — embraces chaos as a style he believes befits a country with a long, tumultuous history birthed in a slave revolt more than 200 years ago and scarred by a cascade of natural and man-made disasters.

In chaos he finds order.

“I am not afraid of chaos because chaos is the womb of light and life,” he said, his baritone voice rising as it does when he gets worked up over a point. “What I don’t like is nonmanagement of chaos. The reason why Haiti looks more chaotic is because of nonmanagement. In other countries it is managed better. Haiti, they should take as reference for what could happen in the rest of world.”

Scholars widely view Frankétienne as Haiti’s most important writer. He wrote what many consider the first modern novel entirely in Haitian Creole, “Dezafi,” in 1975, and a play well known here that challenged political oppression, “Pelin Tet.” It is a biting work from 1978 that is aimed, not so subtly, at Jean-Claude Duvalier, the son of the dictator François Duvalier and himself a former dictator known as Baby Doc, who returned here from exile in January.

Although not well known in the English-speaking world, Frankétienne has star status in French- and Creole-speaking countries and was rumored to be on the short list for a Nobel Prize in Literature in 2009.

After the quake, his works gained more international attention, particularly in Canada and France. “The Trap” debuted in March 2010 at a Unesco forum in Paris that named him an artist for peace; galleries in New York have organized shows featuring his artwork. Still, he also holds informal Sunday workshops with young artists in Haiti to talk about and critique their work.

“He is not only a major Haitian writer, he is probably the major Haitian writer, forever,” said Jean Jonassaint, a Haitian literature scholar at Syracuse University.

Frankétienne’s output, about 40 written works and, by his count, 2,000 paintings and sketches, comprises dense, baroque affairs. He invents new words, blending French and Haitian Creole. Long digressions are de rigueur. His paintings, which he says are selling particularly well these days, blur swirling blacks, blues and reds, often covered with poems.

He admires James Joyce, and it shows. “ ‘Finnegan’s Wake’ was like a crazy book, just like I write crazy books,” he said.

Still, the Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat said Frankétienne remained popular among Haitians, in part because some of his plays had been videotaped and passed around in Haiti and in immigrant communities in the United States.

“Pelin Tet,” in which the grim life of two Haitian immigrants in New York deliberately echoes the oppression of the Duvalier era on the island, is a touchstone for many Haitians, said Ms. Danticat, who grew up in the same neighborhood as Frankétienne and was, in part, inspired to write by his rise to the top.

“His work can speak to the most intellectual person in the society as well as the most humble,” she said. “It’s a very generous kind of genius he has, one I can’t imagine Haitian literature ever existing without.”

Frankétienne was born as Franck Étienne on April 12, 1936, and raised in the Bel-Air neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, the son of a Haitian farmworker and an American businessman, who later abandoned her.

Frankétienne’s mother worked as a street vendor — selling cigarettes, charcoal, candies, moonshine — while raising eight children.

“Since I was 5 or 6 I was smoking or drinking, but my mother never knew,” he recalled. He was the oldest, and she strove to send him to school (he, in turn, tutored his younger siblings, leading him to establish his own school).

The school he attended was French-speaking. Frankétienne initially did not know a word of French, but angered at being teased by other students, he set about mastering the language and developing an affinity for words and artistic expression.

His best-known works came in the 1960s and ’70s, and he ranks his novel “Dezafi” as one of his most cherished. Set in a rural Haitian village, it weaves cockfighting, zombification, the history of slavery and other themes into an allegory of the country’s pain and suffering.

“It is the challenge of finding the light to liberate everyone,” he said. He wrote it in Creole, he said, because that was the voice of the characters he imagined.

But Frankétienne also felt a need to assert his Haitian identity, as people often look at his fair skin, blue eyes and white hair and doubt he is from this predominantly black country.

“They might think I am white or mulatto or whatever, but I am not,” he said. “I have black features, Negro features. My mother was an illiterate peasant and she had me when she was 16. She was taken in by an American, a very rich American. The American was 63 and my mother was 16 at the time.”

Switching from Creole to English, which he is usually too timid to speak, he added, “You understand who I am now?”

After completing “Dezafi,” he was frustrated that so few of his compatriots could read it, with nearly half the adult population illiterate. He switched to plays, even if that meant irritating the dictatorship.

“Dictators are mean but not necessarily stupid, so they knew I didn’t have any readers,” Frankétienne said. “What really gave them a problem was when I started with plays.”

Other writers and artists left Haiti during the dictatorship, but he stayed as his reputation grew outside the country and human rights groups closely followed him, providing, he believes, some cover from Mr. Duvalier.

Later, he joined other intellectuals in denouncing Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the first democratically elected president after Jean-Claude Duvalier was overthrown. Mr. Aristide, he said, became fixated on power and tolerated corruption and thuggery in his administration.

“He is a ghost, too,” Frankétienne said of Mr. Aristide’s return in March after seven years in exile.

His only regret, he said, is that his work is not widely translated and better known. If he knew Chinese, Japanese, Italian or other languages, he said, he would put them in his works.

“Everything is interconnected,” he said. “We are connected to everything, everyone.”

Frankétienne added, “The only thing not chaotic is death.”"
frankétienne  haiti  2011  literature  chaos  death  writing  form  theater  poetry  creole  language  identity  education  zombies  voodoo  vodou  voudoun  slavery  history  jeanjonassaint  edwidgedanticat  babdydoc  papadoc  jean-claudeduvalier  françoisduvalier  disorder  order  nonmanagement 
november 2018 by robertogreco

« earlier    

related tags

&  -  12  19eyz  200  2011  2017  2018  2019  365  aa  ab  abuse  access  accessibility  accessible  add  addiction  adhd  advice  affective  affiliation  africa  aggression  agriculture  ai  air  ajit  alcohol  alternative  always  alzheimers  amazon  analysis  anorexia  anthropocene  anxiety  apraxia  archetypalpsychology  art  artensterben  artistic  artsy  asapscience  asd  at&t  atom  attention  attitude  austerity  autism  autismresources  babdydoc  barriers  bed  bedtime  bee  beecolony  behavior  benefit  binge  biodiversity  bipolar  birds  blindness  blogs  bluevolution  body  boil  book  borderline  borders  bpd  brain  brandwatch  brexit  british  bulimia  bullying  burnhamandy  burrdoug  business  calorie  camhs  can't  cap  capitalism  carceral  carcinogen  cause  change  chaos  chequers  chf  children  civil  clean  cleaneating  climate  climatechange  clinical  cognition  cognitive  collapse  colony  comedy  community  comorbidity  complex  compulsive  condello  condition  conservation  content  control  correlation  council  cptsd  creation  creole  crime  criminal  crisis  critique  current  cyborgmanifesto  dark  dc:creator=masonpaul  dctagged  death  deborahbirdrose  deficity  delay  demand  depression  depressive  deprivation  depthpsychology  design  destruction  developmental  dha  diagnosis  diet  dietary  diffusion  direct  disabilities  disease  displacement  disruption  dissociative  ditch  donald  donaldtrump  donnaharaway  doubledeath  down  dream  drug  dsm  dti  dup  earnings  eating  eatingdisorder  ecological  ecology  education  edwidgedanticat  efficient  emotional  encryption  energy  enthalpy  entropy  environment  environmental  epa  erg  eu  euthanasia  executive  exercise  experience  exploitation  exposure  extermination  extinction  extraction  extremism  facebook  fad  fake  familial  families  farright  fatal  fcc  fear  feminism  flickr  flowchart  food  food–industrial  force  form  foundation  frank  frankétienne  françoisduvalier  functional  fungicide  gamer  games  gaming  gaming_disorder  gardinerbarry  gas  gaslighting  genetic  genocide  girls  global  global_challenges  globalwarming  glyphosat  glyphosate  google  greennewdeal  guide  gut  h-1b  haiti  hardbrexit  harikunzru  harmful  have  health  healthcare  hearing  heat  help  hemochromatosis  herbicide  history  hoarding  hobby  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  human  humanism  hyperactivity  hyperfocus  hypersensitivity  hysteria  identity  ifttt  illness  illnesses  imaging  immunology  immunomodulation  impact  improvement  impulse  impulsivity  in  incest  infection  information  innovation  insects  insight  insomnia  instagram  insurance  integrity  interdependence  interest  internal  internet  intervention  ireland  iron  isp  it's  javidsajid  jean-claudeduvalier  jeanjonassaint  jim  johnboyd  joke  joule  journalism  junk  justice  kids  kiru  klimakatastrophe  label  labourparty  language  law  lifestyle  light  like  lin  linma  liquid  literature  lobby  ma  madcow  magick  magnetic  major  malnutrition  management  manchester  mania  manipulation  marrandrew  mass  mathematics  mcdonnelljohn  medicine  melatonin  memory  mens  mental  metabolic  metabolism  mh  microbiota  microsoft  mindfulness  ministry  minority  misophonia  mmorpg  model  molecule  monsanto  monster  mood  morethanhuman  mortality  motivation  movement  multilateralism  multispecies  nami  nancyhartstock  narcissistic  national  natural  net  netflix  neuro  neurobiology  neurodevelopment  neurological  neurominority  neutrality  news  nhs  nightmare  nodeal  noise  nonmanagement  northernireland  nutrition  nz  obesity  objectivity  observations  of  omega-3  online  ooda  order  orthorexia  other_bookmarks  pai  papadoc  parents  peer-reviewed  personality  pesticide  phd  philosophy  philosophyofscience  phobia  physical  physics  platforms  poetry  police  policing  politics  pollution  postmodernism  pregnancy  primal  principle  prion  privacy  pro-eating  probiotic  probiotics  problems  processing  profile  project  psni  psy  psychedelic  psychiatry  psychology  psychopathology  ptsd  public  pufa  pufas  queer  raabdominic  radiology  randomness  rct  reaction  reality  referendum  regulation  regulators  rem  remedies  removal  representation  research  risk  robert_sardello  routine  row  ruminating  sad  safety:  santacruz  schizophrenia  science  scientism  seasonal  security  self-regulation  self  selfportrait  sensenbrenner  sensory  sexuality  shadow  shortage  situ  situatedknowledge  slavery  sleep  sleeping  smartboard  social  solid  solidarity  soul  spectrum  speech  spontaneously  starmerkeir  state  steam  stem  step  stereotype  stigma  stimulation  stories  strategies  study  subjectivity  sugar  sun  supplements  surreal  surrealphotography  sutman  symptoms  system  tdcs  teaching  technology  televison  temperature  tensor  terrorism  the  theater  therapy  thermal  thermodynamic  thrive  throughherlens  tips  tired  tms  to  toryparty  toxic  toxicity  trade  trans  transcranial  transfer  trauma  treatment  trial  trump  tv  twitter  uk  un  uncertainty  understanding  unit  units  unrest  vapo  varadkarleo  vested  vestibular  video  videogame  visas  vitagen  vivid  vivo  vodou  volunteer  voodoo  voudoun  warming  web  webdesign  what  whatsapp  who  winding  women  wordpress  writing  x  yakult  zombies  βιντεοπαιχνίδια  εξαρτήσεις  ψυχολογία 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: