deserted   31

Abandoned Olympic Venues Around The Globe » Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.
The disused bobsled track from the Sarajevo 1984 Winter Olympics is seen on Mount Trebevic, near Sarajevo, September 19, 2013. Abandoned and left to crumble into oblivion, most of the 1984 Winter Olympic venues in Bosnia's capital Sarajevo have been reduced to rubble by neglect as much as the
photojournalism  photography  photos  photo  olympics  "olympic  games"  deserted  abandoned 
august 2016 by JosefStepanek
Island from James Bond movie ‘Skyfall’ « Flickr Blog
One particular Japanese island stands out for its shabby condition: Hashima Island (端島; meaning “Border Island”). The gem of urban exploration also goes by other names, including Gunkanjima (Battleship Island in Japanese) and Ghost Island.
islands  cool  deserted  japan 
january 2013 by DocSavage
Matthew Christopher: Photographer of Abandoned Places
[ By WebUrbanist in Abandoned Places & Architecture. ]



Some of the locations have storied histories, and others remain a mystery – photo shoots of spaces that must remain off the map to avoid disturbing delicate or dangerous ruins, or trespassing on private property.

Matthew Christopher has taken pictures of it all, from prisons and hospitals to churches with basement meth labs to deserted transportation infrastructure and now-demolished architecture. When he got in touch with WebUrbanist, a balance had to be struck between secrecy and revelation.

But beyond simple still images, he has escalated his photography to fully-interactive, (click here to see them embedded on his website:) three-dimensional online panoramas – these compelling variants are part film, part photo, and provide an really impressive sense of spatial immersion (hint: be sure to go full-screen for the full effect – these are high-resolution!).

Some of these places are in the middle of preservation battles as well, their futures as uncertain as their histories. A few are publicly known, leaving Matthew able to discuss them, like this prison and this state hospital. He also has both prints and books available at this store on his website.


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Abandoned_Places  Architecture  3d  abandoned  buildings  Deserted  History_&_Factoids  immersive  infrastructure  mystery  panoramic  photoraphs  places  spaces  from google
december 2012 by jearl8000
25-Year Refab: Concrete Factory Converted to Castle Home
[ Filed under Conversions or in the Architecture category ]



Over a quarter of a century ago, an architect stumbled upon the half-ruined remains of an old cement factory. The grounds contained dozens of silos, vast subterranean spaces and long-silent manufacturing equipment.

Decades later, the results of his ongoing renovation project are beyond remarkable. The complex now houses its re-designer, Gothic-influenced Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill, serving as his primary residence.

It is also home, however, to include vast offices, archives, design labs and flowing series of outside patios, decks, gardens and paths – parts of an ever-evolving master plan.

Perhaps the most impressive space in the place is called The Cathedral (and with good reason). It is a huge, open-plan, high-ceiling gathering area used for everything from exhibitions and lectures to parties and concerts.

Layers of lush greenery – ivy, cypress, eucalyptus, palm and olive trees – have been slowly added (and subsequently grown) throughout this piece-by-piece remodel, giving the exterior grounds new life as well as the interior areas.

As for decor: twenty-five years is enough time to know that less can be more, and the resulting decorative evolution errs on the side of simple and conventional objects, careful not to detract too much from the majesty of the rooms themselves. But looks can be deceiving – some of the core-seeming concrete is itself new, but mixed in with the old.



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Architect Thomas Wienands (images by Tobias H...
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[ Dornob Design - Filed under Conversions or in the Architecture category ]

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Architecture  Conversions  abandoned  architect  concrete  deserted  designed  factory  gothic  historic  home  house  master  modern  plan  refab  todo:tag  from google
february 2011 by jdherg
25-Year Refab: Concrete Factory Converted to Castle Home
[ Filed under Conversions or in the Architecture category ]



Over a quarter of a century ago, an architect stumbled upon the half-ruined remains of an old cement factory. The grounds contained dozens of silos, vast subterranean spaces and long-silent manufacturing equipment.

Decades later, the results of his ongoing renovation project are beyond remarkable. The complex now houses its re-designer, Gothic-influenced Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill, serving as his primary residence.

It is also home, however, to include vast offices, archives, design labs and flowing series of outside patios, decks, gardens and paths – parts of an ever-evolving master plan.

Perhaps the most impressive space in the place is called The Cathedral (and with good reason). It is a huge, open-plan, high-ceiling gathering area used for everything from exhibitions and lectures to parties and concerts.

Layers of lush greenery – ivy, cypress, eucalyptus, palm and olive trees – have been slowly added (and subsequently grown) throughout this piece-by-piece remodel, giving the exterior grounds new life as well as the interior areas.

As for decor: twenty-five years is enough time to know that less can be more, and the resulting decorative evolution errs on the side of simple and conventional objects, careful not to detract too much from the majesty of the rooms themselves. But looks can be deceiving – some of the core-seeming concrete is itself new, but mixed in with the old.



Keep Going - Check out this Great Related Dornob Design:




Factory Refab: Beautiful White, Steel & Brick Loft in Berlin


Berlin may be the most undervalued urban center of contemporary Europe - cheaper than London or Paris yet more developed than Prague or Warsaw, it is a city at intersection of art and culture, East and West. Moreover, it is filled with unused and underused spaces - warehouses, factories and stations that make for amazing lofts like this one.

Architect Thomas Wienands (images by Tobias H...
Click Here to Read More »»

















[ Dornob Design - Filed under Conversions or in the Architecture category ]

[ Dornob | Archives | Categories | Privacy | TOS ]
Architecture  Conversions  abandoned  architect  concrete  deserted  designed  factory  gothic  historic  home  house  master  modern  plan  refab  todo:tag  from google
february 2011 by jdherg
Ani – Ghost City of 1001 Churches
Image Credit Flickr User SnotchAni – some call it the City of 1001 Churches, others the City of Forty Gates.  Yet no one has called it home for more than three centuries.

Abandoned by its once prosperous and powerful inhabitants, it is situated on the Turkish side of a militarised zone between the border of Turkey and Armenia. 

The city of Ani is no stranger to death, destruction and desertion.

Image Credit Flickr User antonioperezrioImage Credit Flickr User SnotchIt is a ghost city today but once its Armenian inhabitants numbered close to 200 thousand.  In its heyday it was a metropolis which rivalled Constantinople, Cairo or Baghdad as a center of culture and enterprise.  Although it was never on traditional trade routes its sheer size and power commanded visits by merchants from all directions.  Yet what happened to reduce this once magnificent and regionally dominant city to virtually dust?

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User SnotchThe city is the victim of a colossal and centuries old struggle for power between various factions in the region.  Founded in the fourth or fifth century AD the following millennium saw Armenians, Kurds, Georgians, Mongols and Turks struggle for and ascend to power in the city-state.

Image Credit Flickr User Fat Tire TourAlmost each time a faction rose to power the city was ransacked almost to the point of obliteration.  Ani finally wheezed its metaphorical last breath by the middle of the eighteenth century, exhausted to extinction, as it were, by the constant struggle for supremacy over its dominion.

Image Credit Flickr User BecklecticThe city was originally Armenian and the territory on which it stands is still disputed between modern day Turkey and Armenia.  It was first mentioned in the annals of the Armenian Kamsarakan dynasty in the fifth century AD.  They were one of the seven great houses of Parthia and their origins went back to the Persian Arsacid – a major Iran based power.

Image Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaImage Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaThe name of the city seems to have come from Ani-Kamakh, an Armenian fortress but was also known as Khnamk though historians do not really know why.  The best suggestion is that it comes from the Armenian for to take care of.  Certainly, the city was designed for just that – to protect and shelter its citizens. It is situated on a triangular plain.  At its height it must have been an extraordinarily visually striking sight for approaching visitors.  Chosen for its naturally defensive situation, to the east it is protected by a ravine and river, to the west a steep valley.

Image Credit Flickr User sly06Image credit Flickr User mxThe early ninth century saw the decline of the Kamsarakans and they were replaced by another Armenian dynasty, the Bagratuni.  Their leaders referred to themselves as ishkhan or princes and they ruled over perhaps the most peaceful period of Ani’s history.  A pivotal point for the success of the city came in 992 when the head Bishops of the Armenian Church moved their sear to the thriving city state.  Its population doubled within a century, which while not remarkable in modern terms must have seemed like a golden age of growth for the Bagratuni.

Image Credit Flickr User Fat Tire ToursA pair of quarrelling siblings would start Ani’s protracted but inexorable decline.  When King Gagik I died in 1020 neither of his sons would defer to the other and so the kingdom was split apart.  The older, Hovhannes Smbat took over Ani and the younger, Ashot, the rest of the Bagratuni principality.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieImage Credit Flickr User SnotchHovannes Smbat wanted and needed peace in his time so struck a deal which meant just that but would have terrible long term consequences for the city.  He knew that the neighboring Byzantine Empire regarded his lands with envious eyes and that slowly and surely they were drawing plans against him.  So he did something quite remarkable. To avoid invasion he promised his kingdom after his death to the Byzantine Emperor, Basil, and made him his heir.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User Michigan HeartsWhen Hovannes Smbat died in 1041, Basil’s successor, Michael IV, obviously wanted what had been promised and claimed sovereignty.  The new King of Ani, Gagik II, was having none of this and managed to fight back no less than three armies sent to capture the city.  However, the still living Ashot was captured and although he had never been king of Ani, this final humiliation led to the surrender of the city.

Image Credit Flickr User mxImage Credit Flickr User ArcsiSo, in 1045 Ani became a Byzantine city, together with a Greek governor. It was now part of what people called The New Rome.  Not for too long, however.  The Seljuk Turks had other ideas for the city and in 1064 the army of their Sultan, Alp Arslan (aided by the Georgians under King Bagrat) laid siege to the city.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchThe blockade lasted three weeks.  As a more modern saying goes, we are as a society only nine meals away from anarchy so although three weeks may not seem a long time, the conditions within the city must have been horrific.  Worse was to come.  Once the city was captured, Sultan Alp Arslan ordered the complete and total slaughter of the population.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieYet that was not the end of Ani.  Many of the Armenian population had escaped the slaughter through fleeing before the siege and slowly and surely they returned.  The Sultan eventually became disinterested in the city and sold it, lock stock and barrel to a Muslin Kurdish dynasty known as the Shaddadids. The 1001 churches would be joined by mosques.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieAn uneasy peace settled between the overwhelmingly Christian and Armenian population and their new Muslim overlords.  Generally the Shaddaddis attempted through a process of conciliation and intermarriage with the Bagratid nobility (who were still around!) to keep that peace.  They had to – each time the population felt that they overstepped the mark in terms of governance they appealed to the neighboring (and Christian) kingdom of Georgia for help.

Image Credit Flickr User James GuppyImage Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieThe Georgians were happy to oblige.  They invaded and held the city not once or twice but three times (1124, 61 and 71).  Each time they would chastise and punish the Shaddadids while eventually releasing power back to them.  It was not a happy time for the Armenian population.

Image Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaImage Credit WikimediaImage Credit WikimediaEventually the Georgians, under their legendary Queen Tamara, took final and decisive action in 1199.  They removed the Shaddadids permanently from power and gave governorship of the city to the Armenians.  These successors of the Bagratids formed a new dynasty, almost three hundred years before Columbus reached America, naming it after their General and founder, Zakare and calling themselves the Zakarids.

Image Credit WikimediaWealth, trade and prosperity returned to the city.  Yet mayhem and massacre was only a generation away – from yet another new enemy.  In 1236 the Mongols captured Ani and put a large percentage of the population to the sword.  The Zakarids were allowed to continue to rule but as Mongol rather than Georgian vassals. It was here that the decline of the city started to gather momentum.

Image Credit Flickr User mxImage Credit Flickr User mxBy the fourteenth century the city came under the control of a series of Turkish dynasties.  The Armenian bishopric left in 1441 and in 1571 the city came under the control of the Ottoman Empire which consistently neglected it. The small population that persisted for some time after was itself gone by 1750.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User SnotchThe city was ‘rediscovered’ by archaeologists during the next century.  Several excavations took place but further damage would be done after the First World War.  Turkey and Armenia continued to militarily fight over territory until 1921 when Ani, much to the chagrin of the Armenians, was contained within the borders of Turkey.

Image Credit WikimediaThe neglect this valuable archaeological site suffered at the hands of the Turkish authorities can hardly be called benign.  In May 1921 the Turkish Assembly sent a message to the commander of their Eastern Front, authorizing that the "monuments of Ani be wiped off the face of the earth".

Image Credit WikimediaAlthough this did not happen completely, it is to Turkey’s shame the order was ever give and the following decades of neglect only add to that. The Global Heritage Fund, as recently as October of 2010 reported that Ani is "On the Verge" of irreparable loss and obliteration, citing inadequate management and looting as the main causes.

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Sportwomen of the Past - A Collection of Vintage Pictures

At the turn of the last century women in the western world were finding a voice, both collectively and individually. As the Victorian era lapsed in to memory and the Edwardian Era commenced many women chose to pursue sports. Some women chose to flaunt convention and compete in sports that, even today, are not thought of as traditional womens’ sports.

Some of these vintage pictures from the Edwardian Era (and just beyond) may surprise you. Yet these few representatives are surely testament to (under represented photograhically) a greater percentage of the women of the past who were unafraid to pursue their sporting ambitions in a still male dominated world.
Dead  Ani  Photograph  Turkey  Deserted  Empty  Photographs  Armenian  pictures_of  Armenia  Ghost_City  Ghost_Town  History  from google
january 2011 by hober
Ani – Ghost City of 1001 Churches
Image Credit Flickr User SnotchAni – some call it the City of 1001 Churches, others the City of Forty Gates.  Yet no one has called it home for more than three centuries.

Abandoned by its once prosperous and powerful inhabitants, it is situated on the Turkish side of a militarised zone between the border of Turkey and Armenia. 

The city of Ani is no stranger to death, destruction and desertion.

Image Credit Flickr User antonioperezrioImage Credit Flickr User SnotchIt is a ghost city today but once its Armenian inhabitants numbered close to 200 thousand.  In its heyday it was a metropolis which rivalled Constantinople, Cairo or Baghdad as a center of culture and enterprise.  Although it was never on traditional trade routes its sheer size and power commanded visits by merchants from all directions.  Yet what happened to reduce this once magnificent and regionally dominant city to virtually dust?

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User SnotchThe city is the victim of a colossal and centuries old struggle for power between various factions in the region.  Founded in the fourth or fifth century AD the following millennium saw Armenians, Kurds, Georgians, Mongols and Turks struggle for and ascend to power in the city-state.

Image Credit Flickr User Fat Tire TourAlmost each time a faction rose to power the city was ransacked almost to the point of obliteration.  Ani finally wheezed its metaphorical last breath by the middle of the eighteenth century, exhausted to extinction, as it were, by the constant struggle for supremacy over its dominion.

Image Credit Flickr User BecklecticThe city was originally Armenian and the territory on which it stands is still disputed between modern day Turkey and Armenia.  It was first mentioned in the annals of the Armenian Kamsarakan dynasty in the fifth century AD.  They were one of the seven great houses of Parthia and their origins went back to the Persian Arsacid – a major Iran based power.

Image Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaImage Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaThe name of the city seems to have come from Ani-Kamakh, an Armenian fortress but was also known as Khnamk though historians do not really know why.  The best suggestion is that it comes from the Armenian for to take care of.  Certainly, the city was designed for just that – to protect and shelter its citizens. It is situated on a triangular plain.  At its height it must have been an extraordinarily visually striking sight for approaching visitors.  Chosen for its naturally defensive situation, to the east it is protected by a ravine and river, to the west a steep valley.

Image Credit Flickr User sly06Image credit Flickr User mxThe early ninth century saw the decline of the Kamsarakans and they were replaced by another Armenian dynasty, the Bagratuni.  Their leaders referred to themselves as ishkhan or princes and they ruled over perhaps the most peaceful period of Ani’s history.  A pivotal point for the success of the city came in 992 when the head Bishops of the Armenian Church moved their sear to the thriving city state.  Its population doubled within a century, which while not remarkable in modern terms must have seemed like a golden age of growth for the Bagratuni.

Image Credit Flickr User Fat Tire ToursA pair of quarrelling siblings would start Ani’s protracted but inexorable decline.  When King Gagik I died in 1020 neither of his sons would defer to the other and so the kingdom was split apart.  The older, Hovhannes Smbat took over Ani and the younger, Ashot, the rest of the Bagratuni principality.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieImage Credit Flickr User SnotchHovannes Smbat wanted and needed peace in his time so struck a deal which meant just that but would have terrible long term consequences for the city.  He knew that the neighboring Byzantine Empire regarded his lands with envious eyes and that slowly and surely they were drawing plans against him.  So he did something quite remarkable. To avoid invasion he promised his kingdom after his death to the Byzantine Emperor, Basil, and made him his heir.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User Michigan HeartsWhen Hovannes Smbat died in 1041, Basil’s successor, Michael IV, obviously wanted what had been promised and claimed sovereignty.  The new King of Ani, Gagik II, was having none of this and managed to fight back no less than three armies sent to capture the city.  However, the still living Ashot was captured and although he had never been king of Ani, this final humiliation led to the surrender of the city.

Image Credit Flickr User mxImage Credit Flickr User ArcsiSo, in 1045 Ani became a Byzantine city, together with a Greek governor. It was now part of what people called The New Rome.  Not for too long, however.  The Seljuk Turks had other ideas for the city and in 1064 the army of their Sultan, Alp Arslan (aided by the Georgians under King Bagrat) laid siege to the city.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchThe blockade lasted three weeks.  As a more modern saying goes, we are as a society only nine meals away from anarchy so although three weeks may not seem a long time, the conditions within the city must have been horrific.  Worse was to come.  Once the city was captured, Sultan Alp Arslan ordered the complete and total slaughter of the population.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieYet that was not the end of Ani.  Many of the Armenian population had escaped the slaughter through fleeing before the siege and slowly and surely they returned.  The Sultan eventually became disinterested in the city and sold it, lock stock and barrel to a Muslin Kurdish dynasty known as the Shaddadids. The 1001 churches would be joined by mosques.

Image Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieAn uneasy peace settled between the overwhelmingly Christian and Armenian population and their new Muslim overlords.  Generally the Shaddaddis attempted through a process of conciliation and intermarriage with the Bagratid nobility (who were still around!) to keep that peace.  They had to – each time the population felt that they overstepped the mark in terms of governance they appealed to the neighboring (and Christian) kingdom of Georgia for help.

Image Credit Flickr User James GuppyImage Credit Flickr User Jean and NathalieThe Georgians were happy to oblige.  They invaded and held the city not once or twice but three times (1124, 61 and 71).  Each time they would chastise and punish the Shaddadids while eventually releasing power back to them.  It was not a happy time for the Armenian population.

Image Credit Flickr User Jez, Rani and AmritaImage Credit WikimediaImage Credit WikimediaEventually the Georgians, under their legendary Queen Tamara, took final and decisive action in 1199.  They removed the Shaddadids permanently from power and gave governorship of the city to the Armenians.  These successors of the Bagratids formed a new dynasty, almost three hundred years before Columbus reached America, naming it after their General and founder, Zakare and calling themselves the Zakarids.

Image Credit WikimediaWealth, trade and prosperity returned to the city.  Yet mayhem and massacre was only a generation away – from yet another new enemy.  In 1236 the Mongols captured Ani and put a large percentage of the population to the sword.  The Zakarids were allowed to continue to rule but as Mongol rather than Georgian vassals. It was here that the decline of the city started to gather momentum.

Image Credit Flickr User mxImage Credit Flickr User mxBy the fourteenth century the city came under the control of a series of Turkish dynasties.  The Armenian bishopric left in 1441 and in 1571 the city came under the control of the Ottoman Empire which consistently neglected it. The small population that persisted for some time after was itself gone by 1750.

Image Credit Flickr User SnotchImage Credit Flickr User SnotchThe city was ‘rediscovered’ by archaeologists during the next century.  Several excavations took place but further damage would be done after the First World War.  Turkey and Armenia continued to militarily fight over territory until 1921 when Ani, much to the chagrin of the Armenians, was contained within the borders of Turkey.

Image Credit WikimediaThe neglect this valuable archaeological site suffered at the hands of the Turkish authorities can hardly be called benign.  In May 1921 the Turkish Assembly sent a message to the commander of their Eastern Front, authorizing that the "monuments of Ani be wiped off the face of the earth".

Image Credit WikimediaAlthough this did not happen completely, it is to Turkey’s shame the order was ever give and the following decades of neglect only add to that. The Global Heritage Fund, as recently as October of 2010 reported that Ani is "On the Verge" of irreparable loss and obliteration, citing inadequate management and looting as the main causes.

You may also like:

Sportwomen of the Past - A Collection of Vintage Pictures

At the turn of the last century women in the western world were finding a voice, both collectively and individually. As the Victorian era lapsed in to memory and the Edwardian Era commenced many women chose to pursue sports. Some women chose to flaunt convention and compete in sports that, even today, are not thought of as traditional womens’ sports.

Some of these vintage pictures from the Edwardian Era (and just beyond) may surprise you. Yet these few representatives are surely testament to (under represented photograhically) a greater percentage of the women of the past who were unafraid to pursue their sporting ambitions in a still male dominated world.
Dead  Ani  Photograph  Turkey  Deserted  Empty  Photographs  Armenian  pictures_of  Armenia  Ghost_City  Ghost_Town  History  from google
january 2011 by cwage
Whatever happened to Second Life?
It's desolate, dirty, and sex is outcast to a separate island. Barry Collins returns to Second Life to find out what went wrong, and why it’s raking in more cash than ever before
secondlife  deserted  sex 
january 2010 by gohai

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