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Facebook, Google face first GDPR complaints over “forced consent”
“It’s simple: Anything strictly necessary for a service does not need consent boxes anymore. For everything else users must have a real choice to say ‘yes’ or ‘no’,” Schrems writes in a statement. “Facebook has even blocked accounts of users who have not given consent,” he adds. “In the end users only had the choice to delete the account or hit the “agree”-button — that’s not a free choice, it more reminds of a North Korean election process.”
dd  Facebook  Google 
yesterday by motiveunknown
Spotify to Move Back on XXXTentacion Policy After Outcry: Report
Now, Spotify is telling industry executives that it will eventually restore songs by XXXTentacion to playlists, as Bloomberg reports. Spotify executives are currently speaking with both the music industry and civil-rights activists to determine the best course of action in the circumstances. According to Bloomberg, the policy changes are still being determined and final decisions have yet to be made. There are also no plans to further promote R. Kelly on the platform.
dd  spotify 
yesterday by motiveunknown
Why Vevo gave up trying to fight YouTube
Of course, no one from the labels or YouTube or Vevo will say any of this on the record. And some of them continue to insist, off the record, that things are groovy. But eventually you can get a candid take that spells it all out. Like this note a former YouTube exec sent me today. "Consider it an anonymous victory dance: The entire hope for Vevo from YouTube’s perspective, when it launched, was that it would be successful enough to keep the labels from taking down their music and launching a competitor, but not so successful that it ultimately was a better destination than YouTube. [...] YouTube needed Vevo to exist for just long enough to become so popular that the labels had no leverage anymore."
dd  YouTube 
yesterday by motiveunknown
Bye, Spotify: can this new streaming service help listeners play fair?
Resonate, based in Berlin and established by founder and CEO Peter Harris in 2015, aims to put the money and power in the hands of the artists. It does this through three main selling points: an alternative to a monthly subscription service, an innovative technology that allows for a more transparent and efficient way of paying artists, and its cooperative model. “It’s a protest against capitalism, it’s a protest against the Silicon Valley model of startups and platforms and, in some sense, it’s a protest against the way music is now being distributed and consumed,” Harris says.
dd  streaming 
yesterday by motiveunknown
Merlin turns 10 and celebrates indies: ‘We’re over-indexing’
The organisation has grown from a team of three when it launched in May 2008 to 21 staff now, servicing tens of thousands of independent labels. It also paid out its billionth dollar in distributions in August 2017. “We’ve gone back and looked at some of the notes we took in those early meetings more than 10 years ago, and the notion that we’d ever have paid out more than a billion dollars? That was never in the original business plan!” CEO Charles Caldas tells Music Ally.
dd  merlin 
yesterday by motiveunknown
As Music Modernization Act Enters Senate, Anti-Copyright Activists Come Out Of The Woodwork
Now that the bill has been introduced in the Senate, though, it's open season: anti-copyright activists are coming out of the woodwork, claiming that the right to be paid for recordings made before 1972 amounts to "a pointless wealth-transfer," (Internet activist Cory Doctorow), "new barriers for fans of old music," (the EFF), even "a gift through a monopoly regulation of speech" (academic and former presidential candidate Lawrence Lessig). Worse yet, as Lessig wrote in Wired, all of this is "buried in an otherwise harmless act."
dd 
yesterday by motiveunknown
Spotify to pay out $112m in royalties to songwriters after settlement
It’s also a win for Spotify, which was pushing for the judge to approve the settlement, previously agreed upon in May 2017. The agreement has met with dissent from music publishing company Wixen, which collects royalties for artists including Janis Joplin and Neil Young. The company filed its own $1.6bn lawsuit in January, arguing for damages of $150,000 per song for more than 10,000 songs; it described the settlement decision as “a 98.7% discount for non-wilful infringement” and “a practical free pass on wilful infringement”. Wixen added that the settlement “offers [songwriters] an unfair dollar amount in light of Spotify’s ongoing, wilful copyright infringement of their works”.
dd  spotify 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Vevo Android, iOS Apps Shutting Down As Company Refocuses on YouTube
Major-label owned Vevo is giving up on plans to build its own music video platform outside of YouTube’s control: Vevo is shutting down its mobile apps and consumer-facing website, the company announced Thursday morning. “We will phase out elements of our owned and operated platforms,” the company said in a blog post Thursday. “Going forward, Vevo will remain focused on engaging the biggest audiences and pursuing growth opportunities.” In other words: The company is refocusing on YouTube.
dd  Vevo 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Why Sony Bought Bulk of EMI Before It Had To -- And What Competitors Could Win By Objecting To the Deal
When Sony decided to buy out the Michael Jackson estate's half of Sony/ATV, Warner Music Group, BMG and Impala all objected to the deal. IMPALA has already objected to this deal and the other two will likely chime in with the same concerns, hoping to throw a wrench into the proceeding that would result in divestments that they could then buy. In fact some suggest that their main goal in objection would be to buy whatever crumbs fall off of Sony's table. Yet Sony has spent the last six years as the administrator of EMI and already counts its market share as its own, so it's not clear what antitrust concerns might arise with a simple increase in its EMI stake to 90 percent.
dd  sonymusic 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Licensing Hub ICE Signs New Content Deal with Mixcloud
"We're excited to confirm a full pan-European deal with ICE," said Mixcloud Co-founder Nico Perez. "Mixcloud has been supporting artists, songwriters and creators since the start, and we are proud to partner with ICE on this mission." Mixcloud’s new ICE ‘Core’ license covers repertoire for over 290,000 PRS for Music, GEMA and STIM members, in addition to some of the leading independent music publishers.
dd  mixcloud 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Facebook launches new tools for Group admins, including free customer service
Facebook’s Groups are one of the social network’s most popular products, with more than 1.4 billion monthly users across tens of millions of active groups. Today, the company is rolling out a series of new features aimed at those who create and manage these groups, including customer support with answers and help provided by a real person, not a machine or automated responses. Admins are also getting a dedicated online education portal and more tools to manage their groups’ posts.
dd  Facebook 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Spotify Launches New Video Series Teaching Artists How to Better Use Platform, Navigate Music Business
The series features Spotify employees, including global head of creator services Troy Carter and former global head of artist and label marketing (and current Universal Music Group executive vice president, creative) Dave Rocco, and artists such as Rick Ross, Little Dragon and Mike Posner, offering advice in quirky, easily digestible episodes. The first 10 installments were released on Wednesday with topics including "What Is Spotify for Artists?," "Building Your Artist Profile, "How to Read Your Data," "Engaging Your Audience," "Promoting Your Work," "Building Your Team" and more.
dd  spotify 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
How Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter have handled GDPR compliance
All companies large and small, as well as other organisations such as public bodies and charities, are affected by GDPR. And for the very biggest firms, it's an especially crucial issue. Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, Microsoft and Apple hold colossal amounts of information about billions of people around the world. Fall foul of GDPR and they risk being fined huge sums of money. Each of the big five has taken a different approach to GDPR – with some radical variations between them. We've run down some of the bigger changes made by the companies and their various subsidiaries. READ NEXT
dd  gdpr 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Rob Stringer talks Spotify, YouTube, The Orchard and Sony's 'aggressive investment' in data tools
Stringer was also asked about the possibility of streaming platforms ‘signing’ artists to exclusive distribution deals – moves from which, it was suggested, the likes of Apple and Amazon wouldn’t need to generate a profit. Is that a potential future threat to the major labels? “Any time that artists are encouraged to be on one platform is a risk to our business,” said Stringer. “Obviously the moves that have been made by subscription platforms so far [for artist exclusives] are related to getting paid subscribers on their platforms. So far, we’ve been able to mitigate those circumstances.
dd  sonymusic 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
YouTube Bets on Music as 'Trojan Horse' to Boost Subscription Business
The move also appears to be a tacit admission by YouTube that currently there is more of that opportunity in music subscriptions than there is in video, a landscape overrun with competition from deep-pocketed players including Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and Apple. While those companies are pumping several billion dollars each into premium programming and rich talent deals, sources say the budget for originals has not expanded meaningfully from the high nine-figures it spent last year despite the recent success of more high-profile projects like Cobra Kai.
dd  YouTube 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
Jeremy Renner Music Doc Set for Blockchain Platform TaTaTu
Jeremy Renner will be the subject of a music documentary that will stream on blockchain platform TaTaTu.  The feature will be a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the music on the animated family film Arctic Justice: Thunder Squad, following Renner and record producer Eric Zayne’s as they write, produce and perform the music for the animated movie and soundtrack.
dd  blockchain 
2 days ago by motiveunknown
'There's no huge cause for concern': Value of electronic music industry dips 2% to £5.5 billion
Having grown 60% in just three years during the boom years of the early 2010s, EDM's growth had slowed to 3% by 2017. The new figures represent the first decline since Watson began compiling the report at the start of the decade, but he does not believe they should set off alarm bells. “Whenever you have an industry that goes through a lot of growth and then matures you'll always see parts of it dip off," he told Music Week. “We haven’t seen everything fall off a cliff. We remain cautiously optimistic and there's no huge cause for concern."
dd 
3 days ago by motiveunknown
Impala warns of regulatory fight ahead for Sony / EMI deal
When we reported yesterday on Sony’s plans to up its stake in EMI Music Publishing, we noted that the deal would require regulatory approval before it could go through. Now independent body Impala has warned that this approval may be tough for Sony to secure. “The European Commission will want to avoid reinforcing the Sony/Universal duopoly, the two horse race which started in 2012 with the sale of EMI,” said its executive chair Helen Smith yesterday. “This is a step too far and I would expect to see an in-depth investigation in the EU and other key jurisdictions.”
dd  sonymusic  emi 
3 days ago by motiveunknown
YouTube Music is great for record labels, but bad for music lovers
For the balance to truly shift from record labels to streaming services, there will have to be consolidation in the industry, with big streaming services buying smaller competitors, or possibly mergers between the larger on-demand services. Only then, says Kazunoro Ito, an analyst at Morningstar, will streaming platforms “gain more pricing power”. The losers will be most artists - except top acts, although even they will “continue to be less powerful in the industry.”
dd  YouTube  spotify 
3 days ago by motiveunknown

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