datascience   20366

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Twitter
RT : Do join next Lendingkart meetup on to learn about and other fascinating usecases from…
datascience  fintech  from twitter_favs
13 hours ago by amitkaps
Data For Progress
Data for Progress is the think tank for the future of progressivism. Our goal is to to show how a progressive agenda can win nationwide.

We provide research, polling on left issues and analysis to support activists and advocacy groups, challenging conventional wisdoms about the American public that lack empirical support.

We are a multidisciplinary group of experts using state of the art data science techniques to support progressive activists and causes.
bigdata  progressive  politics  activism  data  datascience  research  left  liberal 
22 hours ago by msszczep
Twitter
A rules and approach to effective is imperative - but execution is dependant on a human that unde…
SEO  DataScience  from twitter
2 days ago by jhill5
Of Statistics and Other Mythical Beasts | Philip Jenkins
"When we read any statistical claim, several questions should strike us immediately, to decide whether those numbers are credible or reliable. We always need to ask how the individual data points were reported and collected, and how the numbers were compiled. Specifically,

Who is doing the counting?

What are they counting?

Are those agencies or groups in a position to observe and assess reality?

Do they have motives to interpret the stats in particular ways?

What can the raw numbers tell us about attitudes or behaviors?

To illustrate the kind of problems I will be exploring, I’ll draw some examples from the study of suicide, which makes my points quite well.

To begin with a legendary sociological horror story. Sociology textbooks usually begin by discussing concepts and definitions of community, and how these change with the onset of modernity. For many years, one of the examples most commonly used to illustrate these ideas involved suicide statistics, and particularly the stark contrast separating conditions in Ireland and Sweden. Way back when – in the 1970s, say – these countries stood at opposite poles in terms of modernity and religiosity. Also, Ireland’s suicide statistics were extremely low, while Sweden’s were very high.

Aha, noted the textbooks, the reasons for this are obvious. (I stress I am reporting attitudes and conditions from decades past, not present day). Ireland is a traditional religious society, an organic community rooted in the village and the extended family, where everyone feels they have a place. People just don’t commit suicide. Sweden, in contrast, is an advanced secular society, based on values of individualism. People feel anomie, they are cut off from the world, they have few close family ties, and they face existential crises that lead them to kill themselves. Unlike the pious Irish, secular Swedes lack the religious inhibitions that might prevent them from taking that step. QED. Now on to our next textbook example …

Well, not exactly. After many years of seeing such examples in print, some scholars asked just what were the statistics on which the claims were based. Statistics, after all, don’t measure behavior, they measure recorded behavior. Imagine a Swedish case where a man has died, and by him stands a bottle of pills, and a note explaining his decision to end his life. The police are sympathetic, but record the act as a presumed suicide, and that is confirmed by a brief investigation. We have our statistic. Now imagine the same event in contemporary Ireland, say in 1965. Suicide in this society is a mortal sin, a horrendous blot on the record of any family or community, and the authorities will work very hard indeed to find any conceivable way to avoid the obvious interpretation. Perhaps police will discreetly burn the suicide note, or else pass it to the local Catholic priest for his counsel, and he will suppress the damning evidence. In saying this, I am suggesting no sinister motives whatever: authorities were working together for benevolent purposes, to protect family and community. But the result was that the local coroner would have no reason to find a verdict of suicide, and would report a tragic accidental overdose. There is no suicide to report, or to count.

The same act, in other words, would have one statistical outcome in one society, and a totally different one in another. Before an act or event can become a statistic, someone has to identify it as falling within a particular category, and someone has to report it. And someone – possibly a totally different person – has to record it officially, giving it a particular label.

So were suicides more common in Sweden or Ireland in these years? On the available evidence, we can make no such comment: we have no idea. For all we know, perhaps the Irish were killing themselves at a far higher rate than the Swedes. But going further, it is impossible to make any determination whatever about that claim. There are things that we don’t know, but also things that we literally cannot know, and few social analyses accept that latter possibility."
statistics  DataScience  qualitative  methodology 
2 days ago by lukemperez
Of Statistics and Other Mythical Beasts
Who is doing the counting?
What are they counting?
Are those agencies or groups in a position to observe and assess reality?
Do they have motives to interpret the stats in particular ways?
What can the raw numbers tell us about attitudes or behaviors?

Aha, noted the textbooks, the reasons for this are obvious. (I stress I am reporting attitudes and conditions from decades past, not present day). Ireland is a traditional religious society, an organic community rooted in the village and the extended family, where everyone feels they have a place. People just don’t commit suicide. Sweden, in contrast, is an advanced secular society, based on values of individualism. People feel anomie, they are cut off from the world, they have few close family ties, and they face existential crises that lead them to kill themselves.

Statistics, after all, don’t measure behavior, they measure recorded behavior. Imagine a Swedish case where a man has died, and by him stands a bottle of pills, and a note explaining his decision to end his life. The police are sympathetic, but record the act as a presumed suicide, and that is confirmed by a brief investigation. We have our statistic. Now imagine the same event in contemporary Ireland, say in 1965. Suicide in this society is a mortal sin, a horrendous blot on the record of any family or community, and the authorities will work very hard indeed to find any conceivable way to avoid the obvious interpretation. Perhaps police will discreetly burn the suicide note, or else pass it to the local Catholic priest for his counsel, and he will suppress the damning evidence. In saying this, I am suggesting no sinister motives whatever: authorities were working together for benevolent purposes, to protect family and community. But the result was that the local coroner would have no reason to find a verdict of suicide, and would report a tragic accidental overdose. There is no suicide to report, or to count.

The same act, in other words, would have one statistical outcome in one society, and a totally different one in another. Before an act or event can become a statistic, someone has to identify it as falling within a particular category, and someone has to report it. And someone – possibly a totally different person – has to record it officially, giving it a particular label.
datascience  statistics 
2 days ago by bjr
Strictly Come Dancing: Can you predict the winner? - BBC News
Some dances do appear to be harder than others - but the effect is small.

Each of the samba, rumba, cha-cha-cha and jive has resulted in scores that were 1.5 points lower on average than for other dances (that is, 1.5 points out of 40), which is probably not enough to send a would-be winner to the dance-off.

And in case you were wondering, there is no significant impact from where you appear in the show - going first or last won't affect your chances.
strictly  datascience 
3 days ago by madamim
Muze
Tableau-like JavaScript library for visualizing data
visualization  datascience 
4 days ago by leftyotter

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