craigmod   311

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Twitter
For all of Apple's gatekeeping, the App Store is pretty gnarly and feels like it's full of grift. Mainly, this seems to be an issue of ad-driven models. I'd love to search for *only* paid software, no-in-app-purchase software.

— A Walking Homonoid (@craigmod) October 31, 2019
FavoriteTweet  craigmod 
5 weeks ago by mjtsai
iPhone 11 Pro Photography, Backup Strategies, Ursula Le Guin
Craig Mod writing mostly on night photography but some mentions of backup, Backblaze, e-ink, etc.
backup  backblaze  craigmod  eink  nightmode  iphone 
7 weeks ago by beery
Craig Mod, "Media Accounting 101"
"Publishing has always been a game of competing for attention. Any number of media inventions have threatened to finally eviscerate the book market: radio, movies, television, et cetera. But smartphones tip the scales unlike any previous object. They do so by placing into our pockets a perfect, always-at-hand vector for lopsided user contracts, arriving in the form of apps and websites.

These suboptimal contracts are most obviously exaggerated in what I call “appholes.” That is, any app / service / publication whose business is predicated on keeping a consumer engaged and re-engaged for the benefit of the organization (often to the detriment of the mental and physical health of the user), dozens if not hundreds of times a day."

"'Media accounting' is a kind of self-awareness. This kind of accounting is necessary for us to understand where objects like the book fit into contemporary life. Understanding the objective contracts into which we enter, how they may have come about, and how they’re evolving helps us demystify why physical books (and, similarly, vinyl, analog film, et cetera) not only remain compelling, but become more compelling the more their digital twins grow vast and fuzzy."
CraigMod  RodenExplorers  publishing  apps  economies  attention  books 
10 weeks ago by briansholis
To make a book, walk in the woods with a book — Craig Mod — On Margins
We finished the book. We thought, “Well, if we’re going to do print on demand, why don’t we take this as an opportunity to see how far we can push the print on demand medium.”

Now why make an object? Why do you make that thing? Why print it out? This is the thing that was irking about those other walks. You do a walk. You have this experience, and then it disappears. How do you give edges to something that fundamentally doesn’t have an edge, that doesn’t have a container around it?

All you can do, the best you can do is do an edit of that experience. You can call some subset of moments and try to put them into a thing, into an object, an artifact, something that’s immutable that you can hold in your hands, and you can say this, “This is what we did. This is what that was.”

There’s something powerful about that, about taking an experience, taking the edgeless thing, giving it edges, putting it into an artifact, and putting that out in the world. In fact, just 30 minutes ago on this trail, I bumped into two people, two angels traveling from London, but both expats, one from Perth and the other from Italy, Sally and Francesco.

There’s something to be said about walking the same path over and over again. Same as it is to be said about reading the same book over and over again. The only real reading is rereading. The only real walking is probably rewalking.
writing  podcast  walking  printondemand  editing  editor  craigmod  publishing 
11 weeks ago by Katchoo
The Glorious, Almost-Disconnected Boredom of My Walk in Japan | WIRED
Craig Mod on his long walk; his descriptions of the nature of all-encompassing boredom remind me of hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path, alone, and how your thoughts change as you slip into walking as your primary focus.
craigmod  japan  walking  travel  meditation  boredom 
august 2019 by infovore
Twitter
You know what else is magically fast? Carbon Copy Cloner. Apple's Time Machine had grown so slow, I went back to CCC after a decade of absence. I can't believe how quick it is. It's pure backup delight. Thank you @bombichsoftware!

— A Walking Homonoid (@craigmod) July 26, 2019
FavoriteTweet  craigmod 
july 2019 by mjtsai
Walking, Habits, Systems — Ridgeline issue 027
It’s not that I wanted to go on a long walk, it’s that I wanted to become more of a walker. A walker in the professional sense, the committed sense. Or — zooming out further still — perhaps not even become a walker but become someone who fights — within the flimsy framework of their own life — for extended stretches of thinking-time. And not just fights but believes in the fight, the value, of that time, and believes in what can come out of it.

Reframe: A long walk isn’t about distance goals, it’s about systems of walking and systems of thinking. A long walk is a good forcing function. (And is an activity that I find extremely pleasurable, happens to align with my musculature and tootsies; I can walk and walk and walk and walk it seems (with standard attendant aches and pains, of course).)

In the basket of idiosyncratic-habits-to-improve-upon, I had plopped the intention of smiling more and with less self consciousness. Which is a circuitous way of working to relax the face, eliminate a broad upper-body tension. I coupled the smiles with becoming a master hello-er. I smiled and greeted like crazy. A greeting juggler. A clown. A voluble performative monkey. I had the opportunity to smile to folks dozens, if not hundreds, of times each day. Unlike many urban environments, the rural life rewards serial greetings. This is where the amplification effects of walk-monotony kick in. Setting the intention to smile is a simple one. And the monotony foments execution. The reward was seeing folks smile back. Doors opening into lives, extended conversations. My smiles became less demented-looking, so I think. And a few weeks in I was smiling in an entirely different way. Superficial? Maybe, but these are the kinds of small acts, small gestures, that you can refine given the right framework. And seeing or feeling that change happen helps you believe in the systems behind the change.

All said and done, I believe in the systems. Find small ways to set yourself up for incremental success. Make the positive habits inevitable. Word after word. Step after step. I am writing and walking and so very grateful to all of you for following along.
craigmod  walking  smiling  improvement  development 
july 2019 by Katchoo
The Glorious, Almost-Disconnected Boredom of My Walk in Japan | WIRED
In the context of a walk like this, “boredom” is a goal, the antipode of mindless connectivity, constant stimulation, anger and dissatisfaction. I put “boredom” in quotes because the boredom I’m talking about fosters a heightened sense of presence. To be “bored” is to be free of distraction.
...

I DON’T DESIRE to be a hermit. Sharing experiences feels like an essential part of human identity. In 1878, Isabella Bird wrote Unbeaten Tracks in Japan, a hilarious, incisive, cutting travelogue that was constructed largely from letters she sent home from Japan.

Unlike Bird, I wasn't exploring parts of Japan hitherto unseen by non-Japanese eyes, so a series of lengthy letters to friends didn't quite make sense. Instead I riffed off the terseness of SMS messaging to share the psychological and physiological experience of the actual walking. Using a custom-built SMS tool, I sent out a daily text and one photo to an unknown number of recipients. One rule of the system was that I didn't know who had subscribed. The subscribers joined by texting “walk” to a number I wrote on my website and in my newsletters. I’m pretty sure the daily update went out to hundreds, if not thousands of people, but I could not see them.
The recipients could respond, but I’ve yet to see what they said. Those responses have been collected in a print-on-demand book that's waiting for me when I get back home. My intent is then to respond to the responses in aggregate, long after the walk is finished.

The goal of this convoluted system is to use the network without being used by it. And the purpose of time-shifted conversation is to share the walk without being pulled away from it. I could use a tool like Instagram to approximate this, but I’d have to fight with its algorithm and avoid looking at the timeline. I am not superhuman. I would look at the notifications, the likes, and comments. Reply to them. Become intoxicated by the chemicals released by the tiny loops. Invariably this process would make me think about that audience and how they would be reacting to the next text and photo. I would have lost the purity of the experience. And yet, with global network connectivity, there’s no reason to not also broadcast, in part, in real time. To both consider the experience and share it with immediacy. The daily SMS became a forcing function that deepened my experience of the walk, made me more aware of how painful or joyful or crushingly boring the days were. Being able to share in somewhat real time and not be pulled out of the moment was just an issue of tools and framing.

MY SECOND PIECE of digital output was audio-based. Each day, around 9:45 am, I found a unique space nearby where I was walking, took out my little Sony recorder, plugged in a microphone preamp, and then plugged in my binaural microphones. The microphones sit in my ears, sucking in sound like audio microscopes, so it just looks like I’m listening to music. But I’m not; I’m recording high-fidelity audio.

I would record for about 15 minutes, and at the end of the day, right after pushing out my SMS, publish to a podcast called SW945. Binaural audio is like virtual reality audio. Put some headphones on, close your eyes, and you are hearing what I heard, with the same sense of 3D spatiality. For me, the recording process was a little beat—15 minutes of meditation each morning. It forced me to think about the sounds of the day. I recorded in front of temples, standing next to rice paddies full of croaking frogs, in screaming pachinko parlors, bowling alleys, cafes, hotel lobbies. Anywhere that seemed to typify that day, that moment, that chunk of the road. I'd close my eyes and marvel at the sheer volume and specificity of sound around me.

Both the SMS and podcast publishing systems are “open” systems, with no single controlling entity like a Facebook or Twitter. And they are “quiet” systems, in that production and consumption spaces are separated. You don’t have to enter a timeline of consumption in order to produce.
travel  walking  japan  walks  roden  ridgeline  craigmod 
june 2019 by Katchoo
THE GLORIOUS, ALMOST-DISCONNECTED BOREDOM OF MY WALK IN JAPAN
"thousands of inns and tea houses, lacquerware craftsmen, comb stores, sake breweries, swordmakers, brothels, soba shops, temples, and shrines"

"I loaded a GPX route file into an app called Gaia GPS."

"I’d estimate a hello return rate of almost 98 percent."

"I felt as if the walk itself was pulling that kindness from me, biochemically. The feedback cycle was exhilarating. It was banal. It was something I rarely felt when plugged in online: kind hellos begetting hellos, begetting more kindness."

"Using a custom-built SMS tool, I sent out a daily text and one photo to an unknown number of recipients. One rule of the system was that I didn't know who had subscribed. The subscribers joined by texting “walk” to a number I wrote on my website and in my newsletters. I’m pretty sure the daily update went out to hundreds, if not thousands of people, but I could not see them."

"The goal of this convoluted system is to use the network without being used by it. And the purpose of time-shifted conversation is to share the walk without being pulled away from it."

"Both the SMS and podcast publishing systems are “open” systems, with no single controlling entity like a Facebook or Twitter. And they are “quiet” systems, in that production and consumption spaces are separated. You don’t have to enter a timeline of consumption in order to produce."

"simple nondenominational thankfulness"

"With stronger leg and gluteus muscles, the world felt like an extremely high resolution simulation, and I was merely a floating consciousness, bobbing between rice paddies and up and down mountains saying hello to anything that moved. Everything still hurt at the end of the day, but the movement was effortless, and sometimes I found myself yelping with joy, alone in the woods, at the beauty and smoothness of it all. It was around this time that the information urge faded."
CraigMod  Wired  Japan  walk  toliet  gun  safety  healthcare  Nakasendo  time  road  rural  town  village  Wikipedia  GPS  GPX  XML  GoogleMaps  highway  podcast  silence  photo  SMS  binaural  audio 
june 2019 by cosmic
The Glorious, Almost-Disconnected Boredom of My Walk in Japan | WIRED
“Around 10 days in, after the skin had peeled off my pinkie toes and my shoulders started to heal and accept their fate, I found that my general musculature acclimated to the daily grind. Walking shifted from a laborious act of biomechanics, to something that simply happened. This sounds crazy, but it was as if walking became part of my autonomic nervous system, like breathing. With stronger leg and gluteus muscles, the world felt like an extremely high resolution simulation, and I was merely a floating consciousness, bobbing between rice paddies and up and down mountains saying hello to anything that moved. Everything still hurt at the end of the day, but the movement was effortless, and sometimes I found myself yelping with joy, alone in the woods, at the beauty and smoothness of it all. It was around this time that the information urge faded.”
walks  craigmod  mind  time  japan 
june 2019 by colm.mcmullan

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