consequence   71

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Partnering with researchers at UC Berkeley to improve the use of ML
Today, the consequences of exposing algorithmic decisions and machine learning models to hundreds of millions of people are poorly understood. Even less is known about how these algorithms might interact with social dynamics: people might change their behaviour in response to what the algorithms recommend to them, and as a result of this shift in behaviour the algorithm itself might change, creating a potentially self-reinforcing feedback loop. We also know that individuals or groups will seek to game or exploit our algorithms and safeguarding against this is essential.
artificial  intelligence  ai  machine  learning  thoughts  though  twitter  unintended  consequence  consequences  behavior  behaviors  behavioral  change  changes  musing  deep  share  sharing  publishing  disseminating  research 
january 2019 by yencarnacion
Paul Virilio - Wikipedia
The invention of the ship was also the invention of the shipwreck.
technology  consequence 
january 2019 by jspad
Asceticism Is Inevitable - Siddha Performance
I’m reminded of a householder who visited a Swami in the Himalayas.

He said, “Swamiji, you are such a great man. As an ascetic, you have sacrificed everything in order to seek The Truth.”

The Swami replied, “My dear man, I have left behind all those things because they brought me pain. You live amidst such unbelievable pain, attached to all the things of this world. I am at peace. You are in turmoil. It is you who has made the ultimate sacrifice.”
888  illusion  insight  kapil  gupta  recommendation  fear  memory  wisdom  consequence  choice  asceticism  ascetic  mmm  truth  sacrifice  pain  story 
june 2018 by bekishore
‘Is whistleblowing worth prison or a life in exile?’: Edward Snowden talks to Daniel Ellsberg | Film | The Guardian
"(...) [Guardian]: Was whistleblowing worth it?

[Daniel Ellsberg]: I once read a statement by Ed Snowden that there are things worth dying for. And I read the same thing by Manning, who said she was ready to go to prison or even face a death sentence for what she was doing. And I read those comments and I thought: that is what I felt. That is right. It is worth it. Is it worth someone’s freedom or life to avert a war with North Korea? I would say unhesitatingly: “Yes, of course.” Was it worth Ed Snowden spending his life in exile to do what he did? Was it worth it for Manning, spending seven and a half years in prison? Yes, I think so. And I think they think so. And I think they are right."
whistleblowing  moral  life  choice  consequence 
january 2018 by eric.brechemier

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