comres   10

The impact of housing problems on mental health
Shelter in partnership with the research agency, ComRes, explored the relationship between housing and mental health through a two-stage research project in early 2017. Twenty in-depth phone interviews were conducted with GPs in 8 urban areas, and ComRes interviewed 3,509 English adults online.

GPs spontaneously identified housing issues when discussing factors involved in their patients’ mental health presentations. Where housing was seen as the sole cause of mental health conditions, the most commonly cited conditions were anxiety and depression. 1 in 5 English adults (21%) said a housing issue had negatively impacted upon their
mental health in the last 5 years. Housing affordability was the most frequently referenced issue by those who saw housing pressures having had a negative impact upon their mental health.
Housing  mentalHealth  Shelter  ComRes  researchReport  April2017 
may 2017 by publichealth
Pollwatch « ComRes
Sign up to our regular Pollwatch briefing emails which provide insights into the issues of the day, including analysis of the latest polling data and the story they tell.
data  mailinglist  polls  surveys  comres 
april 2015 by paulbradshaw
Loyal Subjects
Churchgoing Christians are mostly (81%) convinced that there is such a thing as a ‘British’ identity, and they retain a strong sense of commitment to the monarchy in general, and the present Queen in particular, according to a Cpanel survey … Continue reading →Loyal Subjects is a post from: BRIN news. Unless otherwise stated, copyright in BRIN content is vested in the University of Manchester. Readers are welcome to link to or otherwise reuse material but should ensure
that BRIN is always acknowledged as the original source.
Survey_news  Church_of_England  ComRes  Cpanel  from google
january 2012 by seatrout
Personal Moral Standards
Churchgoers seem far more willing than the general public to vote with their feet when it comes to politicians and journalists found wanting in their personal moral behaviour. This is according to a third tranche of results from the latest … Continue reading →Personal Moral Standards is a post from: BRIN news. Unless otherwise stated, copyright in BRIN content is vested in the University of Manchester. Readers are welcome to link to or otherwise reuse material but should ensure
that BRIN is always acknowledged as the original source.
Survey_news  ComRes  Cpanel  from google
december 2011 by seatrout
Legalization of Gay Marriage
The Conservative Party risks losing Christian votes if it goes ahead with legalizing gay marriage, as advocated by David Cameron at the Party’s recent conference in Manchester, a ComRes survey published on 4 November 2011 has revealed.

The poll was undertaken on behalf of Premier Christian Media Trust among the ComRes CPanel of UK churchgoing Christians aged 18 and over. 544 were interviewed online between 25 and 31 October 2011. Results are available (albeit with inadequate labelling of data tables for Question 2) at:

http://www.comres.co.uk/polls/Premier_Gay_Marriage_data_tables_Nov11.pdf

Asked how they viewed the Conservative proposal to legalize same-sex marriages, only 11% of Christians supported it, while 83% were opposed (three-quarters of them strongly).

Hostility was particularly concentrated among the over-65s (90%), compared with 26% support in the 18-34 cohort. Denominationally, Independents, Pentecostals and Roman Catholics were most critical.

Overwhelmingly, these churchgoers foresaw negative consequences in the event of the law being changed in respect of gay marriage:

85% were concerned that the value of marriage would be further undermined
78% that it would be harder to argue against ‘other novel types of relationship’ such as polygamy
88% that schools would be required to teach the equal validity of same-sex and heterosexual relationships
93% that clergy would have to conduct gay marriages against their consciences

Absolutely nobody claimed that Cameron’s commitment to legalizing same-sex marriages would make them more likely to vote Conservative. 37% said that it would make no difference to their political behaviour.

But 57% were clear that they would be less disposed to back the Tories in future, this being especially true of Pentecostals (69%) and Roman Catholics (75%).

This CPanel study does not appear to have covered a related and similarly topical issue, the Government’s plan to permit civil partnerships in England and Wales to be celebrated in religious buildings. General public opinion on this matter was summarized in our previous BRIN post at:

http://www.brin.ac.uk/news/?p=889

Legalization of Gay Marriage is a post from: BRIN news. Unless otherwise stated, copyright in BRIN content is vested in the University of Manchester. Readers are welcome to link to or otherwise reuse material but should ensure
that BRIN is always acknowledged as the original source.
Survey_news  ComRes  Cpanel  gay_marriage  homosexuality  marriage  sex  from google
november 2011 by seatrout

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