comcast   4256

« earlier    

How to Lower Your Cable Bill? Threatening to Leave May Not Work - Bloomberg
archived at:
http://archive.is/Q0hvi
but it only seems to have the first 10 or so paragraphs of the article.

The full text is here:

"When Joshua May learned recently that his TV bill would increase by about $40 a month, he called Charter Communications Inc., expecting his cable company to negotiate a better price.

His previous provider, Time Warner Cable, had extended a cheap promotional rate several times so May wouldn’t cancel. But that was before Charter took over the company. When he called this time, the rep wouldn’t budge on the 29% jump for his bundled TV, internet and phone service. So May cut the cord.

“I expected they’d at least offer free HBO or Showtime,” said May, 34, who lives in Springfield, Ohio, and processes loans for a financial institution. “They did nothing.”

Cable stocks advance as broadband overshadows pay TV
May’s experience reflects a growing trend, as pay-TV companies pull back discounts they’ve used for years to retain video subscribers. With internet service growing faster and more profitable, subscribers like May are becoming expendable.

“I’m sort of indifferent,” Charter Chief Executive Officer Tom Rutledge said at an investor conference last month. Two years ago, he said the second-largest U.S. cable company planned to add video customers. Now, they’re not even “a material driver” of Charter’s business, he said.

Over the past few years, pay-TV stocks have suffered wicked swings as investors reacted to growing subscriber losses. But they’ve recovered as the companies shift their focus to lucrative broadband services. Comcast Corp., the largest U.S. cable provider, is up 22% this year and Charter is up 36% to a 21-month high, outpacing the 12% gain for the S&P 500. That’s despite accelerating pay-TV subscriber losses at both companies last quarter.

‘It’s Been Fun’
“It used to be when customers would call and said, ‘I’m thinking of cutting the cord,’ they’d throw all sort of promotions to keep them from leaving,” said Craig Moffett, an industry analyst at MoffettNathanson LLC. “Now they’re saying, ‘Goodbye, it’s been fun, enjoy the broadband subscription.’”

Cable One Inc., a smaller cable company with about 305,000 residential video customers, even helps cord cutters choose between online alternatives like YouTube TV or Hulu’s live TV service, according to Moffett.

Executives at big cable companies say they have no plans to stop selling TV altogether, because offering more services along with internet access gives customers more reasons to stay. At the conference, Rutledge said Charter wants to create “relationships” with customers and “to the extent that video helps drive that or helps us market that, it’s a valuable asset.”

But cable executives are now focused on what they call “profitable” or “high-quality” video subscribers and less interested in cutting deals. At another investor conference in May, Comcast Chief Financial Officer Mike Cavanagh said he wants a subscriber who “really values video and our bundle despite the increases in prices,” and has “the wallet for a fuller video experience.”

Culling Customers
At the same conference, AT&T Inc. CEO Randall Stephenson said his company, which owns the satellite provider DirecTV, is “cleaning up the customer base” by letting go of subscribers who insist on keeping promotional prices when their contracts expire.

Pay-TV providers are making up for the lost revenue by charging everyone more. When subscribers cancel cable TV, they no longer get a discount for bundling TV with internet. When Optimum customers around the New York area cancel TV service, they also typically upgrade to faster -- more expensive -- internet, Altice USA CEO Dexter Goei said last month.

As customers drop pay TV, cable companies will actually see their profit margins widen, Moffett said. That’s because much of their pay-TV revenue goes right to channel owners, like Walt Disney Co. and its ESPN network, in the form of subscriber fees. Fueled by expensive sports rights, those fees are even rising faster than cable TV bills, hurting profits for companies like DirecTV and Comcast. Selling high-speed internet is far more profitable.

Profits Grow
Last quarter, Charter lost 26% more residential TV subscribers than a year ago. But it also added 19% more internet subscribers, fueling a 4.2% gain in adjusted earnings.

Charter appears to be courting internet-only subscribers through recent price changes, according to BTIG LLC analyst Rich Greenfield. Last year, the company raised the price of broadband bundled with other services by $5 a month, he said, while increasing internet-only service by $1. Internet without TV still costs a few dollars more, but Charter is closing the gap, he said.

“It appears as if you are purposefully pushing subscribers toward abandoning your video service,” Greenfield said in a note last fall addressing Charter executives.

‘Turkish Bazaar’
Since taking over Time Warner Cable in 2016, Rutledge has tried to end its promotional culture. He described Time Warner Cable as a “Turkish bazaar,” where customers called in and bargained with customer service reps. At one point, the company offered 90,000 different prices designed to keep cable-TV subscribers from cutting the cord.

When May called about his bill, Charter did offer him one alternative: a $15-a-month online-TV service called Spectrum TV Essentials. The new streaming service, which debuted in February, has more than 60 channels from programmers like Viacom Inc., Discovery Inc. and AMC Networks Inc.

May canceled after a few months because he missed the sports channels. Now, his Spectrum internet service costs $70 a month, and he gets Sling TV from Dish Network Corp. for another $40.

Since Charter acquired Time Warner Cable, efforts by customers to negotiate lower rates have gotten “much tougher,” according to Phillip Dampier, founder of the blog “Stop The Cap.”

“Do not be surprised if they shrug their shoulders and agree to your request to cancel your account on the spot,” Dampier said on his blog last month. “Spectrum, like many cable companies, has gotten pickier about who they offer promotions to, and are willing to say goodbye to barely profitable customers, especially those only subscribed to cable TV.”
"When Joshua May learned recently that his TV bill would increase by about $40 a month, he called Charter Communications Inc., expecting his cable company to negotiate a better price.

His previous provider, Time Warner Cable, had extended a cheap promotional rate several times so May wouldn’t cancel. But that was before Charter took over the company. When he called this time, the rep wouldn’t budge on the 29% jump for his bundled TV, internet and phone service. So May cut the cord.

“I expected they’d at least offer free HBO or Showtime,” said May, 34, who lives in Springfield, Ohio, and processes loans for a financial institution. “They did nothing.”

Cable stocks advance as broadband overshadows pay TV
May’s experience reflects a growing trend, as pay-TV companies pull back discounts they’ve used for years to retain video subscribers. With internet service growing faster and more profitable, subscribers like May are becoming expendable.

“I’m sort of indifferent,” Charter Chief Executive Officer Tom Rutledge said at an investor conference last month. Two years ago, he said the second-largest U.S. cable company planned to add video customers. Now, they’re not even “a material driver” of Charter’s business, he said.

Over the past few years, pay-TV stocks have suffered wicked swings as investors reacted to growing subscriber losses. But they’ve recovered as the companies shift their focus to lucrative broadband services. Comcast Corp., the largest U.S. cable provider, is up 22% this year and Charter is up 36% to a 21-month high, outpacing the 12% gain for the S&P 500. That’s despite accelerating pay-TV subscriber losses at both companies last quarter.

‘It’s Been Fun’
“It used to be when customers would call and said, ‘I’m thinking of cutting the cord,’ they’d throw all sort of promotions to keep them from leaving,” said Craig Moffett, an industry analyst at MoffettNathanson LLC. “Now they’re saying, ‘Goodbye, it’s been fun, enjoy the broadband subscription.’”

Cable One Inc., a smaller cable company with about 305,000 residential video customers, even helps cord cutters choose between online alternatives like YouTube TV or Hulu’s live TV service, according to Moffett.

Executives at big cable companies say they have no plans to stop selling TV altogether, because offering more services along with internet access gives customers more reasons to stay. At the conference, Rutledge said Charter wants to create “relationships” with customers and “to the extent that video helps drive that or helps us market that, it’s a valuable asset.”

But cable executives are now focused on what they call “profitable” or “high-quality” video subscribers and less interested in cutting deals. At another investor conference in May, Comcast Chief Financial Officer Mike Cavanagh said he wants a subscriber who “really values video and our bundle despite the increases in prices,” and has “the wallet for a fuller video experience.”

Culling Customers
At the same conference, AT&T Inc. CEO Randall Stephenson said his company, which owns the satellite provider DirecTV, is “cleaning up the customer base” by letting go of subscribers who insist on keeping promotional prices when their contracts expire.

Pay-TV providers are making up for the lost revenue by charging everyone more. When subscribers cancel cable TV, they no longer get a discount for bundling TV with internet. When Optimum customers around the New York area cancel TV service, they also typically upgrade to faster -- more expensive -- internet, Altice USA CEO Dexter Goei said last month.

As customers drop… [more]
comcast  communication-negotiation  tv-cord-cutting 
18 days ago by daguti
Comcast Building $50M eSports Stadium Arena | HYPEBEAST May 2019
Although the first eSports Stadium belongs to the 100,000-square foot facility in Texas, this will be the first arena built specifically from the ground up for pro-gaming.
esports  Comcast 
4 weeks ago by pierredv
Comcast's stake in Hulu being sold to Disney, giving it 100% - 9to5Mac
Disney is buying Comcast's stake in Hulu, giving it full control of the service with immediate effect, although the actual purchase doesn't complete ...
industry  tv  streaming  hulu  Disney  comcast 
5 weeks ago by krannon
Comcast’s Q1 cable revenues rise despite losing 121,000 video subscribers | FierceVideo
Comcast also added 375,000 new broadband subscribers during the quarter and that business, along with growth in wireless and business services, pushed revenues ahead for the cable segment
comcast  ovum 
8 weeks ago by yorksranter
How to force Comcast IP address to change
If you use Comcast Cable Internet service, you've probably noticed that the IP address hasn't changed for over a year and even though Comcast service tech support says your IP is dynamic, it's really pretty much static (saving you the $7.99 static IP fee).

For some reason, if you need to change your external IP address, Comcast support will tell you to do a power cycle which is basically:

Turn off your router and Comcast modem.
Wait for 20 seconds (or upto 2 minutes).
Turn on the Comcast modem, wait for a minute and then turn on the router.
You should have a new IP address.
Unfortunately, this doesn't work most of the time when you're behind a router (Linksys WRT-54G in my case). Comcast insists that your IP is changed, but a quick check of my IP address shows that my IP is still the same.

The real solution to this is to change the MAC address of your WAN device in your router configuration:
internet  xfinity  mac-address  networking  ip-address  comcast 
9 weeks ago by rockbandit
US FTC orders Comcast, Google, AT&T & others to share full details on
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday issued letters to several major internet service providers like AT&T and Comcast, ordering them all to detail their respective data collection practices.
tech  data  privacy  comcast  google  att 
12 weeks ago by krannon
Charter and other cable companies could ditch video, and it might not be a bad thing, analyst says | FierceVideo
But Moffett points out that smaller cable companies are seeing their video subscriber bases evaporate much faster than their larger peers, and that is by choice. While Comcast and Charter’s video subscriber losses are tracking at 1.7% and 1.4% respectively, Cable One’s annual declines are at 10.3% and Mediacom’s are at 5.5%.

Cable One management told MoffettNathanson that it loses money on every individual subscriber.
comcast  charter  cablecos  video  ovum 
march 2019 by yorksranter
Case Study: Comcast
Comcast: Serving Video Applications to Millions of Customers with Cloud Native
geronimo  kubernetes  prometheus  devops  comcast 
february 2019 by rdump

« earlier    

related tags

0root-bradco  0root-funny  0root-networks  19th_century  2018  21st_century_fox  a  ac  acquisitions  agree  alicegoldfuss  altice  amazon  amazonprime  and  andrew_carnegie  android  anne-marie_slaughter  application  arenas  arstechnica  artificial_intelligence  at&t  at  att  auction  awesome  badtech  bandwidth  be  beat  benefits  bgp  billion_dollar_deals  blog  bloomberg.com  books  boxes  brands  bridge  broadband  broadcaster  budget  business  but  buzzfeed  cable  cablecos  cap  capitalism-greed  case_study  cgm4140com  charter  choices  cloud_computing  comcast_opensource  communication-negotiation  companies-netflix  comparison  competition  config  configuration  content  continues  cord-cutting  cord  corporations  corruption  could  crossover  current  customization  cutting  data  democrats  detection  devops  directv  disability  dish  disney+  disney  diversity  doj  dramatic  eero  elections  end_of_ownership  entertainment_industry  esports  european  eye  fcc  fees:  fiber  financialservices  for  forced  fox  fred_churchville  gazelles  geronimo  gigabit  gigabyte  github_repos  google  hardware  hbo  hbogo  hdhomerun  headed  healthcare  healthinsurance  hiddeninfo  hollywood  how  howto  hulu  in  industry  influencers  infrared  innovation  insurance  internet  interview  into  investors  ip-address  ir  is  isp  isps  its  job  joe_biden  jon_moore  knowledge_community  kubernetes  latte-order  like  live  lobbying  mac-address  mainland  mass_media  media  media_companies  merger  mergers  mergers_&_acquisitions  mesh  microproducers  microservices  minority  mobile  moca  mode  modem  money  monolith  municipal  murdoch  mvno  my  nation  net_neutrality  netflix  netneutrality  network  networking  networks  new-features  news  nimbleness  node  on  opt-out  optico  optout  organization  over  ovum  patternlab  personalization  platform-crap  platforms  prevails  prime  privacy  prometheus  putting  quick-fire  regulation  restapinotes  reuters.com  revenue  review  router  rugbyleague  scaling  scam  sd-wan  sdn  sdwan  security  sell  set-top_boxes  settlement  setup  sexualharrassment  silo_mentality  size  sky  sky:  sme  socialism  socialmedia  software_architecture  spam  speech  speed  speedtest  spoofing  stake  stock_market  strategy  streaming  streamingmedia  stunts  takes  target_marketing  tech  television  test  testing  throtlling  time_warner  tmobile  to  tracking  trends  tutorial  tv-cord-cutting  tv  twist  twitter  unscalability  usa  variety  venue  verizon  vertical  vertical_integration  video  voice-query  vpn  wallstreet  walmart  webpack  wifi  will  with  wlan  xfinity  youtube  zerorating 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: