colonization   364

« earlier    

Where Not to Travel in 2019, or Ever | The Walrus
"When adventurers crave “untouched” places and “authentic” peoples, it’s the locals who ultimately pay"



"For what is still missing from this scenario is consent. In its place is a sense of entitlement as extreme as it is commonplace."



"We want what we want when we go abroad, which often is the untouched, the authentic—even as our arrival, by definition, undermines those very qualities in a place or of a culture and contributes to the slow, involuntary conversion of one way of life into another."



"
Respectful pilgrimages rarely make the history books or headlines, which is all the more reason to pay them attention. Consider the 1971 “antiexpedition” of Norwegian eco-philosopher Arne Næss and his friends to Tseringma, also known as Gaurishankar, in Nepal, a then unsummitted 7,181-metre peak sacred to those living in its shadow. In a pointed critique of mountaineering’s culture of conquering, Næss’s team travelled light, consulted with a local lama as to how high on Tseringma they could respectfully go, and invited villagers along not as porters but as colleagues. A few years later, other foreigners would claim the first ascent of Tseringma, but forget them. Remember Næss and team, who climbed to a certain height, took a look at the summit from a distance, and turned back."
travel  observation  consent  authenticity  2019  kateharris  colonization  colonialism  adventure  untouched  imperialism  india  johnallenchau  pilgrimage  nepal  arnenæss  canon 
march 2019 by robertogreco
SpeculativeEdu | Superflux: Tools and methods for making change
"Anab Jain and Jon Ardern of Superflux (“a studio for the rapidly changing world”) talk to James Auger about their approach, their recent projects, and their educational activities.

Superflux create worlds, stories, and tools that provoke and inspire us to engage with the precarity of our rapidly changing world. Founded by Anab Jain and Jon Ardern in 2009, the Anglo-Indian studio has brought critical design, futures and foresight approaches to new audiences while working for some of the world’s biggest organisations like Microsoft Research, Sony, Samsung and Nokia, and exhibiting work at MoMA New York, the National Museum of China, and the V&A in London. Over the last ten years, the studio has gained critical acclaim for producing work that navigates the entangled wilderness of our technology, politics, culture, and environment to imagine new ways of seeing, being, and acting. The studio’s partners and clients currently include Government of UAE, Innovate UK, Cabinet Office UK, Red Cross, UNDP, Mozilla and Forum for the Future. Anab is also Professor at Design Investigations, University of Applied Arts, Vienna.

[Q] You practice across numerous and diverse fields (education, commercial, gallery). Does your idea of speculative design change for each of these contexts? How do you balance the different expectations of each?

We don’t tend to strictly define our work as “Speculative Design”. Usually we say we are designers or artists or filmmakers. Speculative Design is gaining traction lately, and we might have a client of two who knows the term and might even hire us for that, but usually they come to us because they want to explore a possible future or a different narrative, or investigate a technology. We think our work investigates a potential rather than speculating on a future. Speculation is an undeniable part of the process but it is not the primary motivation behind our work. Our work is an open-ended process of enquiry, whilst speculation can at times feel like a closed loop.

[Q] There is a tendency, in many speculative design works, towards dystopian futures. It seems that as with science fiction, apocalyptic futures are easier to imagine and tell as stories. Focusing on your CCCB installation, Mitigation of Shock, how would you describe this project in terms of its value connotation? What is the purpose of such a project?

For us, Mitigation of Shock is actually not apocalyptic at all, but instead a pragmatic vision of hope, emerging from a dystopian future ravaged by climate change. On a personal level, it can be difficult for people to imagine how an issue like global warming might affect everyday life for our future selves, or generations to come. Our immersive simulation merges the macabre and the mundane as the social and economic consequences of climate change infiltrate the domestic space.

The installation transports people decades into the future (or perhaps even closer on the horizon), into an apartment in London which has been drastically adapted for living with the consequences of climate catastrophe. Familiar, yet alien. A domestic space alive with multispecies inhabitants, surviving and thriving together in an indoor microcosm. Climate projections from the beginning of the century have unfurled into reality, their consequences reverberating across the globe. Climate catastrophes shatter global supply chains. Economic and political fragility, social fragmentation, and food insecurity destabilise society.

Rather than optimistically stick our heads in the sand, or become overwhelmed with fear, we decided to catapult ourselves and others directly into a specific geographical and cultural context to experience the ripple effects of extreme weather conditions. Hope often works best alongside tools for proactively tackling future challenges. Which is why, in this year-long experimental research project, we explored, designed and built an apartment located in a future no one wants, but that may be on the horizon. Not to scare, or overwhelm, but to help people critically reflect upon their actions in the present, and introduce them to potential solutions for living in such a future. The evidence in the apartment may reflect a different future, but all the food apparatus was in fully working condition, no speculation there. We wanted to demonstrate that we have the tools and methods we need to make the change today.

[Q] We are living in complicated times – politically, environmentally, culturally. After several years of speculative and critical design evolution, do you think that it can have a more influential role in shaping futures/alternatives beyond the discussions that typically take place in the design community?

We wrote a little bit about this here: https://medium.com/superfluxstudio/stop-shouting-future-start-doing-it-e036dba17cdc.

[Q] Could it adopt more political or activist role? If so, how could this aspect be incorporated into education?

Yes definitely. Our latest project Trigger Warning explores this very space: https://mod.org.au/exhibits/trigger-warning. And then a completely different project: http://superflux.in/index.php/work/future-of-democracy-algorithmic-power/#temp.

[Anab] Also my students at the Angewandte will be exploring the theme of “futures of democracy” in the upcoming semester.

[Q] Coming from India but educated at the RCA, what was your take on the “privilege” discussion via Design and Violence? More specifically, what can we learn from this debate? How can it push speculative design forwards?

[Anab] I sensed an underlying assumption in that debate that anybody from the West was seen as “privileged” and anyone from any other colonised country is not. Whilst there is a long and troubling history to colonisation in India, I do bear in mind that India was always a battleground for clans and dynasties from other countries long before the West came and colonised it. These issues are very complex, and I think the only way we can attempt to understand them is by avoiding accusations and flamewars, but instead opening up space for everyone’s voice to be heard.

As things stands today, even though I come from India, a lot of people would argue that, within India, I am privileged because I had the opportunity to choose my education path and the person I want to marry. On the other hand, I know lots and lots of people in the West (white/male even) who are disempowered because of systemic privilege within the West. So discussions of race, gender expression and privilege are much more granular than simplistic accusations, and I strongly believe that designers who address complex issues, whilst battling student loans and rents, should be applauded, not condemned.

[Q] How can we resist or overcome the situation where avant-garde design practices, established as a resistance to the dominant system, ultimately become appropriated by the system?

If we successfully overturn capitalism, the rest will follow."
superflux  2019  anabjain  jonardern  jamesauger  design  designfiction  speculativefiction  speculativedesign  capitalism  democracy  climatechange  education  marrtive  film  filmmaking  art  artists  potential  inquiry  open-ended  openendedness  hope  globalwarming  future  politics  activism  india  colonialism  colonization  complexity  privilege  openended 
february 2019 by robertogreco
English settlement of Barbados
The settlement was established as a proprietary colony and funded by Sir William Courten, a City of London merchant who acquired the title to Barbados and several other islands. So the first colonists were actually tenants and much of the profits of their labor returned to Courten and his company.[4]

The first English ship, which had arrived on 14 May 1625, was captained by John Powell. The first settlement began on 17 February 1627, near what is now Holetown (formerly Jamestown),[5] by a group led by John Powell's younger brother, Henry, consisting of 80 settlers and 10 English laborers. The latter were young indentured laborers who according to some sources had been abducted, effectively making them slaves.

Courten's title was transferred to James Hay, 1st Earl of Carlisle, in what was called the "Great Barbados Robbery." Carlisle then chose as governor Henry Hawley, who established the House of Assembly in 1639, in an effort to appease the planters, who might otherwise have opposed his controversial appointment.

In the period 1640–60, the West Indies attracted over two-thirds of the total number of English emigrants to the Americas. By 1650, there were 44,000 settlers in the West Indies, as compared to 12,000 on the Chesapeake and 23,000 in New England. Most English arrivals were indentured.
England  Caribbean  US  History  VA  MA  Colonization  Empire  Indentured  Servants 
february 2019 by dbourn
Newfoundland - Colonization under Henry VII of England
1497, the Italian navigator John Cabot (Zuan/Giovanni Cabotto) became the first European since the Norse settlers to set foot on Newfoundland, working under commission of King Henry VII of England. His landing site is unknown but popularly believed to be Cape Bonavista, along the island's East coast.[16] Another site claimed is Cape Bauld, at the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. A document found in the Spanish National Archives, written by a Bristol merchant, reports that Cabot's crew landed 1,800 miles (2,900 km) west of Dursey Head, Ireland (latitude 51° 35'N), which would put Cabot within sight of Cape Bauld. This document mentions an island that Cabot sailed past to go ashore on the mainland. This description fits with the Cape Bauld theory, as Belle Isle is not far offshore.[16]

Other European explorers
After Cabot, the first European visitors to Newfoundland were Portuguese, Basque, Spanish, French and English migratory fishermen. In 1501, Portuguese explorers Gaspar Corte-Real and his brother Miguel Corte-Real charted part of the coast of Newfoundland in a failed attempt to find the Northwest Passage. Late in the 17th century came Irish fishermen, who named the island Talamh an Éisc, meaning "land of the fish", or "the fishing grounds" in Irish Gaelic. This reflected the abundance of fisheries.

Colonization
In 1583, when Sir Humphrey Gilbert formally claimed Newfoundland as a colony of England, he found numerous English, French and Portuguese vessels at St. John's. There was no permanent population. Gilbert was lost at sea during his return voyage, and plans of settlement were postponed.
16th  Century  England  Colonization  Empire 
february 2019 by dbourn
Sir Walter Raleigh in the Tower of London
Always ambitious, Raleigh was also motivated by his hatred of Spain and support for Protestantism.

Once he gained influence at court, he promoted the idea of creating English colonies in North America to challenge Spanish colonial policy.

The Queen wanted to keep her favourite Walter near to her, so he was forbidden to travel overseas.

However, in 1584, 1585 and 1587 Raleigh organised voyages to North America that led to his sponsorship of an English colony on Roanoke Island (now north Carolina), which he named ‘Virginna’ after his adored Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I.
In 1616 Sir Walter was released from the Tower by James I (but not pardoned). The King ordered him to undertake an expedition to Guiana to search for gold.
Upon his return in June 1618, Raleigh was accused of deliberately inciting war between Spain and England.

A furious James I invoked the original sentence of 1603 and by August the explorer was back to the Tower of London.
England  Colonization  Empire  VA  US  History 
february 2019 by dbourn
King's Chapel in Boston
The King's Chapel congregation was founded by Royal Governor Sir Edmund Andros in 1686 as the first Anglican Church in colonial New England during the reign of King James II. The original King's Chapel was a wooden church built in 1688 at the corner of Tremont and School Streets, where the church stands today. It was situated on the public burying ground, now King's Chapel Burying Ground, because no resident would sell land for a church that was not Congregationalist (at the time, the Congregational church was the official religion of Massachusetts).
England  Colonization  Empire  US  History 
february 2019 by dbourn
Ajacán Mission - Spanish Exploration of the Chesapeake Bay
Early in the 16th century, Spanish explorers were the first recorded Europeans to see the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, which the Spanish called Bahía de Madre de Dios or Bahía de Santa Maria.[3] They were searching for a Northwest Passage to India, and they named the land Ajacán, "Jacán" in Oré.

The Ajacán Mission (also Axaca, Axacam, Iacan, Jacán, Xacan) was a Spanish attempt in 1570 to establish a Jesuit mission in the vicinity of the Virginia Peninsula to bring Christianity to the Virginia Indians. The effort to found St. Mary's Mission predated the founding of the English settlement at Jamestown, Virginia, by about 36 years. In February 1571, the entire party was massacred by Indians except Alonso de Olmos. The following year, a Spanish party from Florida went to the area, rescued Alonso, and killed an estimated 20 Indians.
MD  Spain  Colonization  Empire  Chesapeake  Bay  US  History 
february 2019 by dbourn
Episode 58: The Neoliberal Optimism Industry de Citations Needed Podcast
"We're told the world is getting better all the time. In January, The New York Times' Nick Kristof explained "Why 2017 Was the Best Year in Human History." The same month, Harvard professor and Bill Gates' favorite optimist Steven Pinker lamented (in a special edition of Time magazine guest edited by - who else? - Bill Gates) the “bad habits of media... bring out the worst in human cognition”. By focusing so much on negative things, the theory goes, we are tricked into thinking things are getting worse when, in reality, it's actually the opposite.

For the TEDtalk set, that the world is awesome and still improving is self-evidently true - just look at the data. But how true is this popular axiom? How accurate is the portrayal that the world is improving we so often seen in sexy, hockey stick graphs of upward growth and rapidly declining poverty? And how, exactly, are the powers that be "measuring" improvements in society?

On this episode, we take a look at the ideological project of telling us everything's going swimmingly, how those in power cook the books and spin data to make their case for maintaining the status quo, and how The Neoliberal Optimism Industry is, at its core, an anti-intellectual enterprise designed to lull us into complacency and political impotence.

Our guest is Dr. Jason Hickel."
jasonhickel  2018  stevenpinker  billgates  neoliberalism  capitalism  ideology  politics  economics  globalsouth  development  colonialism  colonization  china  africa  lies  data  poverty  inequality  trends  climatechange  globalwarming  climatereparations  nicholaskristof  thomasfriedman  society  gamingthenumbers  self-justification  us  europe  policy  vox  race  racism  intelligence  worldbank  imf 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Bill Gates says poverty is decreasing. He couldn’t be more wrong | Jason Hickel | Opinion | The Guardian
"An infographic endorsed by the Davos set presents the story of coerced global proletarianisation as a neoliberal triumph"

"Last week, as world leaders and business elites arrived in Davos for the World Economic Forum, Bill Gates tweeted an infographic to his 46 million followers showing that the world has been getting better and better. “This is one of my favourite infographics,” he wrote. “A lot of people underestimate just how much life has improved over the past two centuries.”

Of the six graphs – developed by Max Roser of Our World in Data – the first has attracted the most attention by far. It shows that the proportion of people living in poverty has declined from 94% in 1820 to only 10% today. The claim is simple and compelling. And it’s not just Gates who’s grabbed on to it. These figures have been trotted out in the past year by everyone from Steven Pinker to Nick Kristof and much of the rest of the Davos set to argue that the global extension of free-market capitalism has been great for everyone. Pinker and Gates have gone even further, saying we shouldn’t complain about rising inequality when the very forces that deliver such immense wealth to the richest are also eradicating poverty before our very eyes.

It’s a powerful narrative. And it’s completely wrong.

[tweet by Bill Gates with graphs]

There are a number of problems with this graph, though. First of all, real data on poverty has only been collected since 1981. Anything before that is extremely sketchy, and to go back as far as 1820 is meaningless. Roser draws on a dataset that was never intended to describe poverty, but rather inequality in the distribution of world GDP – and that for only a limited range of countries. There is no actual research to bolster the claims about long-term poverty. It’s not science; it’s social media.

What Roser’s numbers actually reveal is that the world went from a situation where most of humanity had no need of money at all to one where today most of humanity struggles to survive on extremely small amounts of money. The graph casts this as a decline in poverty, but in reality what was going on was a process of dispossession that bulldozed people into the capitalist labour system, during the enclosure movements in Europe and the colonisation of the global south.

Prior to colonisation, most people lived in subsistence economies where they enjoyed access to abundant commons – land, water, forests, livestock and robust systems of sharing and reciprocity. They had little if any money, but then they didn’t need it in order to live well – so it makes little sense to claim that they were poor. This way of life was violently destroyed by colonisers who forced people off the land and into European-owned mines, factories and plantations, where they were paid paltry wages for work they never wanted to do in the first place.

In other words, Roser’s graph illustrates a story of coerced proletarianisation. It is not at all clear that this represents an improvement in people’s lives, as in most cases we know that the new income people earned from wages didn’t come anywhere close to compensating for their loss of land and resources, which were of course gobbled up by colonisers. Gates’s favourite infographic takes the violence of colonisation and repackages it as a happy story of progress.

But that’s not all that’s wrong here. The trend that the graph depicts is based on a poverty line of $1.90 (£1.44) per day, which is the equivalent of what $1.90 could buy in the US in 2011. It’s obscenely low by any standard, and we now have piles of evidence that people living just above this line have terrible levels of malnutrition and mortality. Earning $2 per day doesn’t mean that you’re somehow suddenly free of extreme poverty. Not by a long shot.

Scholars have been calling for a more reasonable poverty line for many years. Most agree that people need a minimum of about $7.40 per day to achieve basic nutrition and normal human life expectancy, plus a half-decent chance of seeing their kids survive their fifth birthday. And many scholars, including Harvard economist Lant Pritchett, insist that the poverty line should be set even higher, at $10 to $15 per day.

So what happens if we measure global poverty at the low end of this more realistic spectrum – $7.40 per day, to be extra conservative? Well, we see that the number of people living under this line has increased dramatically since measurements began in 1981, reaching some 4.2 billion people today. Suddenly the happy Davos narrative melts away.

Moreover, the few gains that have been made have virtually all happened in one place: China. It is disingenuous, then, for the likes of Gates and Pinker to claim these gains as victories for Washington-consensus neoliberalism. Take China out of the equation, and the numbers look even worse. Over the four decades since 1981, not only has the number of people in poverty gone up, the proportion of people in poverty has remained stagnant at about 60%. It would be difficult to overstate the suffering that these numbers represent.

This is a ringing indictment of our global economic system, which is failing the vast majority of humanity. Our world is richer than ever before, but virtually all of it is being captured by a small elite. Only 5% of all new income from global growth trickles down to the poorest 60% – and yet they are the people who produce most of the food and goods that the world consumes, toiling away in those factories, plantations and mines to which they were condemned 200 years ago. It is madness – and no amount of mansplaining from billionaires will be adequate to justify it."

[See also:

"A Letter to Steven Pinker (and Bill Gates, For That Matter) About Global Poverty"
https://www.jasonhickel.org/blog/2019/2/3/pinker-and-global-poverty

"A Response to Max Roser: How Not to Measure Global Poverty"
https://www.jasonhickel.org/blog/2019/2/6/response-to-max-roser

"Citations Needed Podcast: Episode 58: The Neoliberal Optimism Industry"
https://soundcloud.com/citationsneeded/episode-58-the-neoliberal-optimism-industry ]
billgates  statistics  capitalism  inequality  poverty  2019  jasonhickel  davos  wealth  land  property  colonialism  colonization  maxroser  data  stevenpinker  nicholaskristof  gdp  dispossession  labor  work  money  neoliberalism  exploitation 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Caitlin Lowery - I used to be a missionary.
Love First “missionary” work would be an almost entirely inverse approach to religious missionary work as we know it.

Imagine a Love First explorer (not a missionary), venturing out to other cultures and communities—not with the intent to preach or spread the message of Love First, but rather to “discover” the cultures of others and see what those cultures can bring into Love First. To absorb the best of their beliefs, their stories, rather than pushing Love First’s onto them.

Instead of bringing your message to others, you bring others’ message back to us. And invite them along to share their stories themselves, if they’d like (and are able to).
LoveFirst  important  missionary  expansion  colonization  white_supremacy 
november 2018 by KuraFire
anja kanngieser on Twitter: "this is a long thread on #nauru, where i spent last week. nauru is currently most visible as a site for australia’s offshore detention of asylum seekers and refugees. it is also the location of a longstanding #phosphate mine
"this is a long thread on #nauru, where i spent last week. nauru is currently most visible as a site for australia’s offshore detention of asylum seekers and refugees. it is also the location of a longstanding #phosphate mine which covers over 2/3 of the island 1/22

#nauru is experiencing considerable #climatechange. im going to outline some of the social-environmental stresses i observed that nauruans, refugees and asylum seekers are facing, and why we need to talk about #colonialism and #environmental racism for #climatejustice 2/22

#nauru is a beautiful island. its main resource is #phosphate. germany colonised nauru in the late 1800s and in the early 1900s the british found phosphate and started to exploit it for fertiliser and munitions with australia and nz, who became nauru’s trustees in the 1920s 3/22

during both world wars #nauru was a strategic imperial site and was occupied by multiple nations. in the 1960s nauru gained independence and took over mining activities 4/22

these days its extremely hard to get onto #nauru. i was invited to do work on community #mitigation and #adaptation measures. my work involves speaking with community leaders, environment organisations, government workers, activists 5/22

it also involves making #bioacoustic recordings of environments - #nauru's mine, the reef, the lagoon. this means i spend a lot of time listening. this is some of what i was told: 6/22

#nauru is running out of land. there are too many people living on the coast, as topside (the mining site) has not been rehabilitated. its a moonscape up there - huge phosphate pinnacles segregated by steep drops. its hot - it feels like 50 degrees, and its super humid 7/22

no one really goes up there, except people working in the mine, ihms employees and the border force. and refugees and asylum seekers, because thats where the detention centres are. you cant play there or just hang out, its too hot, and if youre not in aircon its unbearable 8/22

#coastal erosion is bad around the north of #nauru. sea walls protect one area but then other areas get flooded. #kingtides flood the single road that runs around the island, meaning people cant get around to access services 9/22

houses on the coast side of the main road on #nauru get #inundated. because of a lack of land, people cant really move far 10/22

much of the ground water in #nauru is #contaminated, by waste, from overpopulated cemeteries leaking into the water lens, run off from the mine and sea water. there is a huge stress on water supplies 11/22

most of #nauru gets its water from the desalination plant, but it takes a long time to get water and if it breaks experts need to be flown in to fix it. not everyone has a water tank, so there are water shortages 12/22

its hard to grow food on #nauru so food is imported. there are long lines of people whenever a shipment of rice is due to arrive. cucumbers cost $13AUD, a punnet of cherry tomatoes $20AUD. people do not earn anywhere near enough money to be able to afford it 13/22

kitchen gardens have been established on #nauru, but they only feed the families that have them, a lot of people feel their soil is not adequate to growing food 14/22

reef fish stocks are depleted on #nauru, so there is a plan to build milkfish supplies in peoples home ponds. as the water is contaminated that means that the fish are contaminated. if people feed the fish to the pigs and eat the pigs, then that meat is also contaminated 15/22

the #phosphate dust from the mine causes respiratory issues in #nauru. it covers houses near the harbour and people refer to it as snow. while primary mining is almost complete, secondary mining is planned. this should last around 20 years, then the phosphate is gone 16/22

#nauru is getting hotter. its so hot that kids dont want to walk to school, which is not aircon. its so hot that no one is really outside during the day. the heat on the coast is not as bad as the heat on topside. but its still hot enough that you dont want to move 17/22

i was told that people remember it being 20 degrees cooler when they were kids. #nauru goes through extreme #droughts 18/22

there are issues with #biodiversity loss and strange movements of sea creatures. i recorded a dusk chorus at a mining site and heard only one bird. at the start of the year dead fish littered the reef. this happens periodically, no one could tell me why 19/22

the noddy birds, which people rely on for food, got a virus earlier this year and there were fallen noddy birds all over the roads. people have spotted orcas in #nauru’s waters. a dugong also washed up on shore. they are not known to inhabit that area 20/22

as i said, these issues affect everyone on #nauru. nauru is highly vulnerable to #climatechange. it is also hugely economically reliant on aid, on the money from the incarceration of refugees and asylum seekers and a rapidly diminishing natural resource: phosphate 21/22

this is why conversations about human rights and environmental justice in #nauru and the #pacific also need to include strong critiques of #neocolonialism, #racism and #paternalism. nauru wasnt always like this. these are ongoing impacts of colonisation 22/22"
nauru  climatechange  globalwarming  2018  anjakannigieser  environment  climatejustice  colonialism  islands  polynesia  australia  newzealand  activism  adaptability  oceans  fishing  health  biodiversity  multispecies  pacificocean  vulnerability  neocolonialism  racism  paternalism  colonization  birds  nature  animals  wildlife  water  waste 
october 2018 by robertogreco

« earlier    

related tags

(organization)  16th  17th  1840s  1970s  1980s  1cat-organizing  2010s  2016-06  2016-07  2016-10  2016-11  2016  2017-01  2017-02  2017  2018  2019  aboriginal  academia  academic  accountability  accumulaltion  activism  adaptability  adultism  adventure  affluence  africa  ageism  agesegregation  aging  agriculture  ai  aiga  aisharichards  algeria  algiers  alilapointe  alternatehistory  amazon  america  amytan  anabjain  analongoni  andreastultiens  angeladecora  animals  anjakannigieser  annepasternak  anniversary  anthropology  anti-colonialism  antiimperialism  appropriation  arabic  architecture  archives  arnenæss  art  art108  article  artists  asgardia  ashleymorford  asia  assimilation  astronomy  athi-patraruga  audrelorde  australia  authenticity  bacteria  battleofalgiers  bay  billgates  billlynn  binaries  biodiversity  birds  blackops  blacks  blaxploitalian  books  bradford  brasil  brazil  broadly  brooklyn  brooklynmuseum  business  businessinterest  cairo  california  canada  canon  capitalism  caribbean  carlosprietodelcampo  carolblack  cartography  cats  cave  caves  century  chandigahr  chesapeake  children  chin  china  chris-ciaccia  chrisciaccia  chrissantella  christianity  cities  citizenship  clarity  class  climatechange  climatejustice  climatereparations  colinedickey  colonialism  colonisation  colony  community  competition  complexity  compulsory  confirmed  conformity  connotation  conquest  consent  content  control  convention  conventions  cooking  copyrights  corporatism  creativity  criticalthinking  crystalfraser  cultural-theory  culturalcritique  culture  curriculum  data  davidblandy  davos  debt  decolonization  decolonize  decolonizethisplace  democracy  deniseferreiradasilva  deschooling  design  designeducation  designfiction  development  diaspora  discipline  discourse  discovery  displacement  dispossession  diversity  dj  documentary  dohraahmed  dorituntall  download  drone  earth  economics  education  egypt  electricity  elizabethresnick  emigration  empire  endeavour  energy  engagement  engineering  england  english  enlightenment  environment  equality  esa  ethics  ethnicity  eugeniazuroski  europe  evangelical  evetuck  example:gooddesign  expansion  experience  exploitation  exploration  extraction  facebook  facetta  families  fascism  favelas  feedy  ff15  fiction  filipacésar  film  filmmaking  filter  finance  financialization  fishing  flags  flexibility  flow  food-justice  food  form  formation  frantzfanon  fredmoten  freedom  fugitiveenlightenment  fugitives  future  game  gamingthenumbers  gaza  gdp  gender  genealogy  geoglyphs  geology  globalization  globalsouth  globalwarming  gloriaanzaldua  goodbye  grades  grading  grammar  grandtheftauto  greatrecession  gta  gta5  happiness  hapticality  haptics  harryettemullen  health  healthcare  hebrew  hegemony  hierarchy  highered  highereducation  history  homelandsecurity  homelessness  homeschool  hongkong  hope  hospice  housecats  housing  housingrights  howwelearn  howweteach  human  humanism  humanities  humanity  hunger  ice  identity  ideology  ifttt  imf  imperialism  impericalism  important  inclusion  inclusivity  incommensurability  indentured  india  indigeneity  indigenization  indigenous  indigenouspeoplesday  individualism  indoctrination  indonesia  inequality  informal  informallearning  informalsettlements  information  inquiry  institutions  insurrection  intelligence  interdependence  international  internationalrelations  internet  intersectionality  invasivespecies  isabelrodríguez  island  islands  italian  italy  jamesauger  jamesbaldwin  jamesdavisnicoll  japanese  jasonhickel  jaxa  jeffreyschnapp  johnallenchau  jonardern  jonathanrosa  junejordan  jupiter  justice  justin-mccurry  justinmccurry  kaguya  karolradziszewski  kateharris  kickstarter  knoweldgeproduction  kowloon  kwamenkrumah  kwayneyang  kyledacuyan  labor  land  language  larryachiampong  latecapitalism  latinamerica  launch  lava-tubes  lava  lavatubes  law  lawrenceabuhamdan  lcproject  learning  lecorbusier  legacy  leisure  liberalism  liberation  libraries  library  lies  life  literature  loneliness  lovefirst  lucilletenazas  luna  lunar-base  lunar  léopoldlambert  ma  mabeltapia  malcolmx  management  maori  mapping  maps  marcbekoff  margaretandersen  marisapérezcolina  marius-hills  markets  marrtive  mars  marwahelal  massachusetts  maxroser  md  meaning  media_archaeology  media_space  medical  meghankelly  meladávila  messiness  method  methods  mexico  migration  militarization  military  missionary  moko_kauae  money  moon-base  moon  mortgages  multispecies  music  māori  narrative  nasa  nativeamerican  nativeamericans  nature  nauru  neebinnaukzhiksouthall  neebinsouthall  nelliewong  nelsonmandela  neocolonialism  neoliberal  neoliberalism  nepal  nera  new_zealand  news  newzealand  nicholaskristof  non-binary  normansheehan  norms  northafrica  northamerica  nuclear  obedience  observation  ocad  occupation  occupy  ocean  oceans  of  open-ended  openaccess  openended  openendedness  openstudioproject  oppression  oraltradition  othering  ownership  pacificocean  palestine  pan-africanism  paper  parenting  patato  paternalism  patriarchy  patricelumumba  pattern  pdf  pedagogy  petermarra  pets  philosophy  pilgrimage  pilgrims  pla...  place-east-bay  planet  plymouth  podemo  poems  poetry  policy  politics  polynesia  postcolonialism  potential  poverty  power  pragmatism  preservation  privateproperty  privatization  privilege  probe  programming  project  property  proposals  propulsion  protest  public  publicspace  punctuation  punishment  race  racial  racism  radoištok  raquelrolnik  reactor  reactors  read  reading  readings  realestatefinancialcomplex  reality  relationships  religion  reproduction  resistance  rhetoric  rhythm  robot  rockets  ronaldreagan  ronasela  russellkennedy  sadieredwing  sakimafundikwa  samoa  scale  school  schooling  schools  science-fiction  science  scifi  scotland  segregation  selene  self-determination  self-justification  selfcare  servants  settlercolonialism  sexism  short_film  shuttle  simnulation  simulation  slums  social-science  socialjustice  society  sociology  solidarity  solmazsharif  somalia  songbirds  sovereignty  space  spacecraft  spaceship  spacetravel  spain  spanish  speculation  speculativedesign  speculativefiction  spices  spinoza  srg  standardization  standards  statistics  stefanoharney  stevenpinker  structure  submission  subprimemortgages  suheirhammad  superflux  sustainability  symbol  syntax  tahrir  tahrirsquare  tattoo  teaching  tealtriggs  tears  technology  tecnology  terisasiagatonu  the  theguardian  thinking  thomasfriedman  thomassankara  to-read-listen-watch  tor  toread  totag  trade  tradition  trail  transformation  travel  trends  trinhminh-ha  trumpadministration  truth  tubes  ufo  uk  undercommons  underground  unitedstates  unschooling  untouched  urban  urbanism  us  va  venus  vernacular  vexillology  vice  video.games  video  videogame  vietnam  violence  vox  vulnerability  walterrodney  war  waste  water  wealth  white_supremacy  whitesupremacy  wildlife  william  wolfgangernst  women  wordpress  words  work  worldbank  worldhistory  worldonfire  writing  wwii  yemen  zakiyyaismail  zarinabhimji  zoetodd 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: