climate-adaptation   23

Notes on the Global Condition: Nuclear aircraft carriers in the age of the anthropocene – ADAM TOOZE
The refusal of the Trump administration to engage with the question of climate change not only causes consternation worldwide. It also causes tension within the…
US_military  climate  climate-adaptation  military-industrial_complex  Trump_administration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
CEEPR - Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research at MIT (MIT Energy Initiative, Economics Dept & Sloan School)
Since 1977, the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) has been a focal point for research on energy and environmental policy at MIT. CEEPR promotes rigorous, objective research for improved decision making in government and the private sector, and secures the relevance of its work through close cooperation with industry partners from around the globe. CEEPR is jointly sponsored at MIT by the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), the Department of Economics, and the Sloan School of Management. Financial support comes from a variety of sources, including state and federal government research funds, foundation grants and contributions from our corporate and government Associates
website  think-tank  energy  energy-markets  energy-transition  climate  climate-policy  climate-adaptation  climate-diplomacy 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
James Dyke - Meltdown Earth: the shocking reality of climate change kicks in – but who is listening? - The Conversation - March 2016
And another one bites the dust. The year 2014 was the warmest ever recorded by humans. Then 2015 was warmer still. January 2016 broke the record for the largest monthly temperature anomaly. Then came last month.

February didn’t break climate change records – it obliterated them. Regions of the Arctic were were more than 16℃ warmer than normal – whatever constitutes normal now. But what is really making people stand up and notice is that the surface of the Earth north of the equator was 2℃ warmer than pre-industrial temperatures. This was meant to be a line that must not be crossed.
Pocket  climate  climate-denialism  US_politics  GOP  climate-models  climate-adaptation  energy  Arctic  from pocket
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Dave Roberts - Carly Fiorina did a 4-minute riff on climate change. Everything she said was wrong.| Vox - August 2015
Fiorina is test marketing the "moderate Republican" approach to do-nothing policies on climate change -- don't look like a crazy science denialist, but after "accepting the science" provide misinformation to justify do-nothing
Pocket  US_politics  GOP  climate-denialism  climate  climate-adaptation  diplomacy-environment  US_foreign_policy  renewables  oil  coal  fiscal_policy  EPA  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jag Bhalla - Is The 'Tragedy of The Commons' a Myth? | Big Think - May 2015
by Jag Bhalla We are ill-fated idiots. That’s what some “rationalists” believe. An ancient Greek origin myth can avert this modern tragedy of reason (a… -- lots of links
rationality  rationality-economics  public_choice  collective_action  tragedgy_of_the_commons  common_good  resource_allocation  environment  climate-adaptation  links  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones, Marco H.D. van Leeuwen, and Stephen Broadberry - The Future of Economic, Business, and Social History | Scandinavian Economic History Review 60, no. 3 (November, 2012): 225–253
3 leading scholars in the fields of business, economic, and social history review the current state of these disciplines and reflect on their future trajectory. Jones reviews the development of business history since its birth at HBS during the 1920s. He notes the discipline's unique record as a pioneer of the scholarly study of entrepreneurship, multinationals, and the relationship between strategy and structure in corporations, as well as its more recent accomplishments, including exploring new domains such as family business, networks and business groups, and retaining an open architecture and inter-disciplinary approach. Yet Jones also notes that the discipline has struggled to achieve a wider impact, in part because of methodological under-development. He discusses 3 alternative futures for the discipline. (1) which he rejects, is a continuing growth of research domains to create a diffuse "business history of everything." (2) is a re-integration with the sister discipline of economic history, which has strongly recovered from its near-extinction 2 decades ago through a renewed attention to globalization and the Great Divergence between the West and the Rest. (3) which he supports, is that business historians retain a distinct identity by building on their proud tradition of deep engagement with empirical evidence by raising the bar in methodology and focusing on big issues for which many scholars, practitioners and students seek answers. He identifies 4 such big issues related to debates on entrepreneurship, globalization, business and the natural environment, and the social and political responsibility of business.
article  economic_history  economic_sociology  business_history  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business-ethics  globalization  MNCs  methodology  environment  climate-adaptation  entrepreneurs  CSR  paywall 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
CDP - About us
CDP works to transform the way the world does business to prevent dangerous climate change and protect our natural resources. We see a world where capital is efficiently allocated to create long-term prosperity rather than short-term gain at the expense of our environment.

Evidence and insight is vital to driving real change. We use the power of measurement and information disclosure to improve the management of environmental risk. By leveraging market forces including shareholders, customers and governments, CDP has incentivized thousands of companies and cities across the world’s largest economies to measure and disclose their environmental information. We put this information at the heart of business, investment and policy decision making.

We hold the largest collection globally of self reported climate change, water and forest-risk data. Through our global system companies, investors and cities are better able to mitigate risk, capitalize on opportunities and make investment decisions that drive action towards a more sustainable world.
website  Lon  risk_management  risk-systemic  climate  climate-adaptation  institutional_investors  disclosure  water  energy  energy-markets  industry  supply_chains  sustainability  corporate_governance  green_finance  green_economy 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Leber - Report: Tidal Floods in East Coast Cities | New Republic - October 2014
Live on the East Coast? Rising sea levels will cause problems for your home and community a lot sooner than you probably think. In a new report, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) forecasts that 30 major cities on the East Coast will face more frequent and extensive flooding in 15 years time. In 30 years, flooding will be a near-daily occurence in nine of these cities. The sea level has risen roughly eight inches globally from 1880 to 2009, largely due to global warming, but the rise has been over 10 inches along parts of the U.S. Atlantic coast. Higher sea level leads to higher tides, which can flood cities' streets, waterfronts, and low-lying properties. As extreme high tides become more common, UCS researchers predict that things like power outages, lost cell phone coverage, and impassable roadways will become challenges of daily life. (..) Climate Central published a report in September that shows many of Washington, D.C.'s low-lying tourist sites, like the National Mall, flooded by the end of the century. Washington D.C. fares the worst in the UCS report as well. Using a moderate model for sea-level rise in the next 15 years, the report says D.C. can expect more than 150 tidal floods a year. By 2045, D.C could expect 400, with the city sometimes flooding twice a day. Most of the 52 places analyzed could see a 10-fold increase of tidal floods. -- 2 reports, downloaded pdfs to Note
climate  ocean  climate-adaptation  US_society  cities  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Certainties, Uncertainties and Choices with Global Warming - NYTimes.com
Steven E. Koonin, once the Obama administration’s undersecretary of energy for science and chief scientist at BP, stirred up a swirl of turbulence in global warming discourse this week after The Wall Street Journal published “Climate Science is Not Settled,” his essay calling for more frankness about areas of deep uncertainty in climate science, more research to narrow error ranges and more acknowledgement that society’s decisions on energy and climate policy are based on values as much as data. (The Journal seems to keep this headline on file; here’s a 2009 essay, “Climate Science Isn’t Settled,” by the M.I.T. climatologist Richard Lindzen.) Predictably, the piece by Koonin, who became the founding director of New York University’s important Center for Urban Science and Progress in 2012, was quickly hailed by fossil fuel defenders. At the same time, some of Koonin’s central points about the state of climate science were sharply challenged by climate scientists and climate campaigners. I was on the run at the time but sent Koonin a couple of questions, which I also posted on Tumblr. Here they are with his answers (with some email shorthand cleaned up), along with a fresh critique of Koonin’s argument by a group of climate science and policy researchers associated with Carnegie Mellon University and a final thought from me: -- Revkin is a squish since clearly the Carnegie Mellon folks aren't making extravagant claims and Koonin's piece is all about framing, which of course is trumpeted as climate denial fodder - he couldn't be that naive leaving it up to the WSJ to frame his piece - he should be hung by the thumbs for giving aid & comfort -- Revkin has good links to discussions of planning with deep uncertainty
article  US_politics  climate  uncertainty  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  links 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhodium Group » American Climate Prospectus: Economic Risks in the US - Risky Business Project Report - June 24, 2014 (updated August)
Trevor Houser, Robert Kopp, Solomon Hsiang, Michael Delgado, Amir Jina, Kate Larsen, Michael Mastrandrea, Shashank Mohan, Robert Muir-Wood, DJ Rasmussen, James Rising, and Paul Wilson -- The US faces a range of economic risks from global climate change — from increased flooding and storm damage, to climate-driven changes in crop yields and labor productivity, to heat-related strains on energy and public health systems. The American Climate Prospectus (ACP) provides a groundbreaking new analysis of these and other climate risks by region of the country and sector of the economy. By linking state-of-the-art climate models with econometric research of human responses to climate variability and cutting edge private sector risk assessment tools, the ACP offers decision-makers a data driven assessment of the specific risks they face. The ACP is the result of an independent assessment of the economic risks of climate change commissioned by the Risky Business Project. In conducting this assessment, RHG convened a research team, co-led by climate scientist Dr. Robert Kopp of Rutgers University and economist Dr. Solomon Hsiang of the University of California, Berkeley, and partnered with Risk Management Solutions (RMS), the world’s largest catastrophe-modeling company for insurance, reinsurance, and investment-management companies. The team’s research methodology and draft work was reviewed by an Expert Review Panel (ERP) composed of leading climate scientists and economists, acknowledged within the report. The ACP was released on June 24, 2014 alongside a Risky Business summary -- American Climate Prospectus: Economic Risks in the United States (complete report, updated August 2014, 23.2 mb)
US_economy  climate  risk  risk-systemic  risk-mitigation  climate-adaptation  insurance  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Legislative Tracker | Georgetown Climate Center
The Georgetown Climate Center tracks federal legislation that affects adaptation, energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and transportation policies. The Center also analyzes key legislation and identifies how pending bills could impact existing state policies and programs.
website  US_government  Congress  legislation  climate  climate-adaptation  risk-mitigation  land_use_planning  infrastructure  local_government  ocean  coastal_development  regulation-environment 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Report: Zoning for Sea-Level Rise | Georgetown Climate Center - December 13, 2012
To help local communities address the increased flooding expected from sea-level rise and more frequent extreme weather events, the Georgetown Climate Center designed a model sea-level rise ordinance to provide local governments with a template for tailoring regulations to meet the needs of their community and its particularized vulnerabilities. To effectively balance all the competing interests in coastal resources in the face of climate threats, local governments will need flexible and robust land-use regulations. Zoning is the most powerful tool that local governments have to preemptively mitigate hazards. Through planning and zoning, local governments can determine what is at risk, what is safe to build, and where it is safe to build. By analyzing vulnerabilities and planning for impacts, local governments can shape landowner expectations and build political support for adaptive measures. Through regulations, local governments can ensure that fewer people and structures are in harm’s way when impacts occur, and that developers site and construct new structures to be more resilient to flooding and other impacts. Below is a link to the executive summary describing this work. -- didn't download
local_government  land_use_planning  property  property-confiscations  property_rights  climate  climate-adaptation  political_economy  regulation  regulation-environment  incentives  ocean  water  coastal_development 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

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