change-economic   9

Robert O. Keohane, review - Mancur Olson, The Rise and Decline of Nations (1983) | JSTOR
Reviewed Work: The Rise and Decline of Nations: Economic Growth, Stagflation, and Social Rigidities. -- Journal of Economic Literature
Vol. 21, No. 2 (Jun., 1983), pp. 558-560 -- quite positive, but useful on where Olson's theory has blind spots -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  political_economy  economic_history  economic_growth  interest_groups  collective_action  international_political_economy  institutional_economics  rational_choice  rationality-economics  rationality  stagnation  rent-seeking  politics-and-money  status  status_quo_bias  social_order  hierarchy  change-social  change-economic  castes  discrimination  inequality  mobility  post-WWII  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Joel Mokyr, Chris Vickers, and Nicolas L. Ziebarth - The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different? | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 31-50
Technology is widely considered the main source of economic progress, but it has also generated cultural anxiety throughout history. The developed world is now suffering from another bout of such angst. Anxieties over technology can take on several forms, and we focus on three of the most prominent concerns. First, there is the concern that technological progress will cause widespread substitution of machines for labor, which in turn could lead to technological unemployment and a further increase in inequality in the short run, even if the long-run effects are beneficial. Second, there has been anxiety over the moral implications of technological process for human welfare, broadly defined. While, during the Industrial Revolution, the worry was about the dehumanizing effects of work, in modern times, perhaps the greater fear is a world where the elimination of work itself is the source of dehumanization. A third concern cuts in the opposite direction, suggesting that the epoch of major technological progress is behind us. Understanding the history of technological anxiety provides perspective on whether this time is truly different. We consider the role of these three anxieties among economists, primarily focusing on the historical period from the late 18th to the early 20th century, and then compare the historical and current manifestations of these three concerns. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  technology  18thC  20thC  21stC  Industrial_Revolution  change-economic  change-social  unemployment  labor_history  robotics  AI  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  labor_share  labor-service_sector  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Gill A. Pratt - Is a Cambrian Explosion Coming for Robotics? (2015) | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 51-60.
Affiliation DARPA - About half a billion years ago, life on earth experienced a short period of very rapid diversification called the "Cambrian Explosion." Many theories have been proposed for the cause of the Cambrian Explosion, one of the most provocative being the evolution of vision, allowing animals to dramatically increase their ability to hunt and find mates. Today, technological developments on several fronts are fomenting a similar explosion in the diversification and applicability of robotics. Many of the base hardware technologies on which robots depend—particularly computing, data storage, and communications—have been improving at exponential growth rates. Two newly blossoming technologies—"Cloud Robotics" and "Deep Learning"—could leverage these base technologies in a virtuous cycle of explosive growth. I examine some key technologies contributing to the present excitement in the robotics field. As with other technological developments, there has been a significant uptick in concerns about the societal implication of robotics and artificial intelligence. Thus, I offer some thoughts about how robotics may affect the economy and some ways to address potential difficulties. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  technology  technology-adoption  tech-mobile_phones  Tech/Culture  robotics  Labor_markets  labor_standards  labor_law  wages  social_process  change-economic  change-social  government-roles  military-industrial_complex  DARPA  investment-government  AI  IT  cloud  telecommunications  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Barzun and Dan Priel - Jurisprudence and (Its) History - Symposium Introduction | Virginia Law Review 101 Va. L. Rev. 849 (2015)
Whereas legal philosophers offer “analyses” that aim to be general, abstract, and timeless, legal historians offer “thick descriptions” of what is particular, concrete, and time-bound. But surface appearances can deceive. Perhaps unlike other areas of philosophy, the subject matter of jurisprudence is at least partially (if not entirely) a social phenomenon. Courts, legislatures, judicial orders, and statutes are the products of human efforts, both collective and individual, and they only exist as legislatures, courts, and the like insofar as they possess the meaning they do in the eyes of at least some social group. For this reason, legal philosophers since at least H.L.A. Hart have recognized their task to be a “hermeneutic” one—one which aims to discern or make explicit the “self-understanding” of legal actors. At the same time, legal historians aim not simply to record legal rules that existed at some given point in history, but to unearth the meaning that actual people—judges, lawyers, politicians, and ordinary citizens—have attached to law. When they do so, they might be seen as uncovering evidence of those same “self-understandings” that philosophers claim constitute law. Perhaps, then, philosophical and historical inquiries about law do not differ so radically from each other after all. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_language  ordinary_language_philosophy  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  historiography  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  constitutional_law  Founders  originalism  contextualism  change-social  change-economic  change-intellectual  norms  hermeneutics  positivism-legal  philosophy_of_history  institutional_change  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L.D. Burnett, review essay - Power to the People? William Leach's "Land of Desire" and Problems in Gilded Age Historiography | s-usih.org January 26, 2013
In "Land of Desire: Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture" (New York: Vintage Books, 1993), William Leach tackles a two-fold problem confronting historians of the period we have identified (infelicitously, in Rebecca Edwards’s estimation) as the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.[1] First, historians face the problem of how to adequately convey the sheer scale and scope of the thoroughgoing transformations in practically every facet of American society during this period. Second, historians face the problem of how to explain these changes. This latter task is always tricky for historians (or at least it should be), and it poses particular challenges for the historiography of this period. -- very nice ruminating on historiographical problems, presentism, shifts in historiographical approaches (e.g. after the linguistic turn) especially questions of agency and/or structure, in this case Leach using the biographical materials newly available in archives to show the development of "consumer cuoture" from the perspective of one of the main pkayers, Sam Wanamaker -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  US_history  19thC  20thC  Gilded_Age  historiography-postWWII  linguistic_turn  cultural_history  agency-structure  poststructuralist  change-social  change-economic  cultural_change  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Duvoux, interview with Erik Olin Wright - Analytic Marxism and Real Utopias | Books & ideas - 16 November 2012
Erik Olin Wright is a prominent American sociologist and the last president of the American Sociological Association. In this interview, E. O. Wright explains the nature of "analytic Marxism”, which renewed the study of Marxism in the late 1970s and 1980s, and comes back on a more recent project called “ Envisioning Real Utopias”, which focuses on radical emancipatory alternatives to existing social structures. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  Marxist-analytical  social_sciences-post-WWII  methodology  sociology  classes  class_conflict  capitalism  capitalism-alternatives  Labor_markets  labor  labor_share  cooperation  worker_co-ops  open_source  social_movements  social_order  change-social  change-economic  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Anton Perdoncin, review essay - North, Wallis and Weingast, Violence and Social Orders (2009, French 2010) | La Vie des idées - April 2011
Anton Perdoncin, « Misère de l’histoire universelle », La Vie des idées, 20 avril 2011. ISSN : 2105-3030.-- Recensé : Douglass C. North, John Joseph Wallis, Barry R. Weingast, Violence et ordres sociaux, Paris, Gallimard, « Bibliothèque des sciences humaines », 2010, traduit de l’anglais par Myriam Dennehy (éd. originale : 2009). 460 p., 21 €. -- Pourquoi certaines sociétés sont-elles plus violentes que d’autres ? Parcourant 10 000 ans d’histoire, Douglass North et ses coauteurs insistent sur le rôle des institutions dans la pacification des rapports sociaux. Pour Anton Perdoncin, cette théorie élitiste, libérale et européocentriste repose sur une conception erronée de la violence, qui en occulte les aspects proprement politiques. -- see footnotes for interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  social_theory  big_history  North-Weingast  institutional_economics  institutions  change-social  change-economic  elites  violence  social_order  social_sciences-post-WWII  bibliography  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader

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