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Dystopia, deine Heimat ist die aktuelle Economist–Leserbriefseite.
Bioengineering  from twitter
11 weeks ago by joha04
The Future According to the Author of Sapiens
The big-data makeover of humanity could be a recipe for disaster. Just a few years ago Yuval Noah Harari was an obscure Israeli historian with a knack for playing with big ideas.
ai  bioengineering  science 
january 2019 by fwhamm
Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops : The Salt : NPR
This is the first major (very major!) bioengineering project that I've heard about. The photosynthesis-powered process of creating sugar molecules is inefficient; this changes the molecule that does this so it works more effectively.
bioengineering  biology  npr  science  engineering  via:slashdot 
january 2019 by mcherm
Engineering Deinococcus radiodurans for metal remediation in radioactive mixed waste environments | Nature Biotechnology
We have developed a radiation resistant bacterium for the treatment of mixed radioactive wastes containing ionic mercury. The high cost of remediating radioactive waste sites from nuclear weapons production has stimulated the development of bioremediation strategies using Deinococcus radiodurans , the most radiation resistant organism known. As a frequent constituent of these sites is the highly toxic ionic mercury (Hg) (II), we have generated several D. radiodurans strains expressing the cloned Hg (II) resistance gene (merA) from Escherichia coli strain BL308. We designed four different expression vectors for this purpose, and compared the relative advantages of each. The strains were shown to grow in the presence of both radiation and ionic mercury at concentrations well above those found in radioactive waste sites, and to effectively reduce Hg (II) to the less toxic volatile elemental mercury. We also demonstrated that different gene clusters could be used to engineer D. radiodurans for treatment of mixed radioactive wastes by developing a strain to detoxify both mercury and toluene. These expression systems could provide models to guide future D. radiodurans engineering efforts aimed at integrating several remediation functions into a single host.
bioengineering  via:whitequark 
december 2018 by athena
Superbugs and the risks of biotech: the next pandemic might be lab-grown - Vox
“Designer bugs”: how the next pandemic might come from a lab

Why we need to take the threat of bioengineered superbugs seriously.
biotech  biotechnology  bioengineering 
december 2018 by jorgebarba
Engineering Deinococcus radiodurans for metal remediation in radioactive mixed waste environments | Nature Biotechnology
We have developed a radiation resistant bacterium for the treatment of mixed radioactive wastes containing ionic mercury. The high cost of remediating radioactive waste sites from nuclear weapons production has stimulated the development of bioremediation strategies using Deinococcus radiodurans , the most radiation resistant organism known. As a frequent constituent of these sites is the highly toxic ionic mercury (Hg) (II), we have generated several D. radiodurans strains expressing the cloned Hg (II) resistance gene (merA) from Escherichia coli strain BL308. We designed four different expression vectors for this purpose, and compared the relative advantages of each. The strains were shown to grow in the presence of both radiation and ionic mercury at concentrations well above those found in radioactive waste sites, and to effectively reduce Hg (II) to the less toxic volatile elemental mercury. We also demonstrated that different gene clusters could be used to engineer D. radiodurans for treatment of mixed radioactive wastes by developing a strain to detoxify both mercury and toluene. These expression systems could provide models to guide future D. radiodurans engineering efforts aimed at integrating several remediation functions into a single host.
bioengineering 
december 2018 by whitequark
10,000 ["How to Send a Message 10,000 Years into the Future."]
"This is The Ray Cat Solution:

1. Engineer cats that change colour in response to radiation.

2. Create the culture/legend/history that if your cat changes colour, you should move some place else."



"In the 1980's, a curious project was proposed by two scientists : why not creating a breed of radioactive cats that would change colors when they are next to nuclear waste?

OFFICIAL SELECTION Pariscience 2015 - International Science Film Festival -- This film is on free access - if you like it or if you feel it should be seen, feel free to share it.

THE RAY CAT SOLUTION
Philosophers Françoise Bastide and Paolo Fabbri were part of the Human Interference Task Force, employed by the US Department of Energy and Bechtel Corp at the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in 1981. Their solution consisted of two steps:

Engineer a cat that changes colour in response to radiation.

Create a culture around this cat, such that if your cat changes colour, you should move someplace else.

This requires a combination of scientific work in biology as well as social sciences and art, and there are many questions to consider:

• How do we actually engineer this cat?
• What are some of the scientific challenges?
• How do we create this culture?
• What types of art are more effective?

and much more..."



"WHAT DOES THE RAY CAT MEAN FOR YOU?
This project is as multi-faceted as it can be. Everyone's expertise and opinions are welcome and encouraged. We are here to challenge each other, ask questions, learn and share knowledge and perspectives with eachother.

SCIENCE
How do we engineer a colour change in response to radiation?
Where do we start and what are the challenges?

ART & DESIGN
How do we send a message 10,000 years into the future?
What types of projects do we need to do in order to create this culture?

POLITICS AND PHILOSOPHY
How is science funded?
What are the regulations and current perspectives on this type of project?
Should ray cats be allowed to exist?"



"SHARE, DISCUSS, CREATE, INVENT
This isn't a project. It is a movement. It doesn't have a particular direction, nor is it meant to. We are starting out with a blank canvas, and many directions we could go. The movement exists simply from those who choose to visit it and contribute.

We encourage creativity, and discussion. Question each other's ideas, inspire new ones, think out of the box and listen to what people have to say. Every mistake made and every question asked is progress.

This movement and process is bigger than the cats. This page also exists as a challenge to artists, scientists and anyone. How provocative are your ideas? Does this project have any less or perhaps more meaning than yours? Are your ideas truly creative and innovative?

There are many questions to answer, and even more questions to ask. We are in our first few years of another ten thousand. If nothing else, we at least have some time.

CONTACT US
Feeling inspired? Want to start a project? Not sure how you can contribute? Write to us at:

info@brico.bio "
cats  bioluminescence  biology  bioengineering  multispecies  radiation  via:vruba  pets  françoisebastide  paolofabbri  color  art  design  science  future 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Scientists Learn the Ropes on Tying Molecular Knots | Quanta Magazine
As chemists tie the most complicated molecular knot yet, biophysicists create a “periodic table” that describes what kinds of knots are possible.
articles  knots  bioengineering 
november 2018 by gmisra
Virus-based piezoelectric energy generation
Piezoelectric materials can convert mechanical energy into
electrical energy1,2, and piezoelectric devices made of a
variety of inorganic materials3–5 and organic polymers6 have
been demonstrated. However, synthesizing such materials
often requires toxic starting compounds, harsh conditions
and/or complex procedures7. Previously, it was shown that
hierarchically organized natural materials such as bones8,
collagen fibrils9,10 and peptide nanotubes11,12 can display piezoelectric
properties. Here, we demonstrate that the piezoelectric
and liquid-crystalline properties of M13 bacteriophage (phage)
can be used to generate electrical energy. Using piezoresponse
force microscopy, we characterize the structure-dependent
piezoelectric properties of the phage at the molecular level.
We then show that self-assembled thin films of phage can
exhibit piezoelectric strengths of up to 7.8 pm V21
. We also
demonstrate that it is possible to modulate the dipole strength
of the phage, hence tuning the piezoelectric response, by
genetically engineering the major coat proteins of the phage.
Finally, we develop a phage-based piezoelectric generator
that produces up to 6 nA of current and 400 mV of potential
and use it to operate a liquid-crystal display. Because biotechnology
techniques enable large-scale production of genetically
modified phages, phage-based piezoelectric materials potentially
offer a simple and environmentally friendly approach to
piezoelectric energy generation.
bioengineering  nanotechnology 
october 2018 by whitequark
Are you ready to eat meat that was grown in a lab, not at a farm? |
Cultured meat could be coming to our plates in the next few years. How is it made? And will it help, or hurt, the planet? Here’s what we know so far.
food  futureoffood  agriculture  bioengineering  farming  ted 
october 2018 by jorgebarba
Crispr Can Speed Up Nature—and Change How We Grow Food | WIRED
Although he worked on a farm as a teenager and has a romantic attachment to the soil, ­Lippman isn’t a farmer. He’s a plant biologist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York with an expertise in genetics and development. And these greenhouse plants aren’t ordinary tomatoes.
additivism  agriculture  bioengineering  crispr  farming  food  nature  stream 
august 2018 by therourke

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