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Introduction · Go-SCP
Go Language - Web Application Secure Coding Practices is a guide written for anyone who is using the Go Programming Language and aims to use it for web development.
This book is collaborative effort of Checkmarx Security Research Team and it follows the OWASP Secure Coding Practices - Quick Reference Guide v2 (stable) release.
The main goal of this book is to help developers avoid common mistakes while at the same time, learning a new programming language through a "hands-on approach". This book provides a good level of detail on "how to do it securely" showing what kind of security problems could arise during development.
golang  programming  security  websec  bestpractices  books 
yesterday by wjy
Introduction · Go-SCP
Go Language - Web Application Secure Coding Practices is a guide written for anyone who is using the Go Programming Language and aims to use it for web development.
This book is collaborative effort of Checkmarx Security Research Team and it follows the OWASP Secure Coding Practices - Quick Reference Guide v2 (stable) release.
The main goal of this book is to help developers avoid common mistakes while at the same time, learning a new programming language through a "hands-on approach". This book provides a good level of detail on "how to do it securely" showing what kind of security problems could arise during development.
golang  security  books  programming  bestpractices  tips  guide  patterns  webdevelopment 
yesterday by newtonapple
Go-SCP · GitBook
Go Language - Web Application Secure Coding Practices is a guide written for anyone who is using the Go Programming Language and aims to use it for web development.
bestpractices  book  golang  Security 
yesterday by dangeranger
UX and Memory: Present Information at Relevant Points | Interaction Design Foundation
Research suggests that human memory is influenced by time. More specifically, memory is enhanced when information is presented to us at a behaviourally relevant point in time. So, if we are presented with an image that is related to our current task, we are more likely to retain this information in short-term memory. When visual information is provided that is not relevant at that point in time, it is, conversely, less likely to be retained in our memory system.

Lin, Pype, Murray, and Boynton (2010) identified the features of a visual scene that increase its memorability as such (paraphrased and added to):

Saliency - The relative importance of an element or scene to the viewer/user. The more important something is to us personally, the more likely we are to remember it at a later point. For example, if we have been scouring the internet for a particular item, we are more likely to remember its location or appearance if we come across it during our searching.
Novelty - Any feature that increases the distinctiveness of an element or scene. When something stands out from all other elements/scenes, we are more likely to recall or recognise it further along. This is also the case for high-level semantic information (i.e. the more something differs from everything else in terms of meaning, the more likely we are to form a strong memory).
Degree of threat - The more threatening, the more likely we are to remember it. Threat-based images, such as fear-inducing animals (e.g. snakes, spiders, sharks, and your boss), injured people, natural disasters, and warning messages are more likely to create an enduring memory trace.
Depth of processing - The longer we spend focussing, concentrating, or attending to something, the more likely we are to remember it. When information is processed semantically (i.e. in terms of its meaning(s)) we are thought to form more elaborate memories that are better resistant to forgetting.
Relevance to behavioural outcome
memory  cognition  usability  bestpractices 
2 days ago by rmohns

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