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Facebook extremism and fake news: How Facebook is training us to be conspiracy theorists — Quartz
And the problem is that—unlike previous social sites—Facebook doesn’t know, because from Facebook’s perspective they have two goals, and neither is about the quality of the community or well-being of its members. The first goal is to keep you creating Facebook content in the form of shares, likes, and comments. Any value you get out of it as a person is not a direct Facebook concern, except as it impacts those goals. And so Facebook is designed to make you share without reading, and like without thinking, because that is how Facebook makes its money and lock-in, by having you create social content (and personal marketing data) it can use.

The second Facebook goal is to keep you on the site at all costs, since this is where they can serve you ads. And this leads to another problem we can talk about more fully in another post. Your average news story — something from the New York Times on a history of the Alt-Right, for example — won’t get clicked, because Facebook has built their environment to resist people clicking external links. Marketers figured this out and realized that to get you to click they had to up the ante. So they produced conspiracy sites that have carefully designed, fictional stories that are inflammatory enough that you *will* click.

In other words, the consipiracy clickbait sites appeared as a reaction to a Facebook interface that resisted external linking. And this is why fake news does better on Facebook than real news.

To be as clear as I possibly can—by setting up this dynamic, Facebook simultaneously set up the perfect conspiracy replication machine and incentivized the creation of a new breed of conspiracy clickbait sites.
Facebook  socialSoftware  bias  design  extremism  conspiracyTheory  belief  businessModels  truth  trust  familiarity  whiteSupremacism  misinformation 
5 weeks ago by petej
Reality — Still Processing — Overcast
"What’s real anymore?"

"We now live in an era where people can choose to believe whatever they want to believe, regardless of proof or evidence. From the Laquan McDonald trial to the film “Green Book” to R. Kelly’s song “I Believe I Can Fly” to the Nick Sandmann/Nathan Phillips encounter at the Lincoln Memorial, we wrestle with the ways that reality is contested, both personally and politically.

Discussed this week:

• "Jason Van Dyke Sentenced to Nearly 7 Years for Murdering Laquan McDonald" (Mitch Smith and Julie Bosman, The New York Times, Jan. 18, 2019) https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/18/us/jason-van-dyke-sentencing.html
• "Who is America?" (Showtime, 2018) https://www.sho.com/who-is-america
• "Green Book" (directed by Peter Farrelly, 2018) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6966692/
• "Why Do the Oscars Keep Falling for Racial Reconciliation Fantasies?" (Wesley Morris, The New York Times, Jan. 23, 2019) https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/23/arts/green-book-interracial-friendship.html
• "Surviving R. Kelly" (Lifetime, 2019) https://www.mylifetime.com/shows/surviving-r-kelly
• The Nick Sandmann/Nathan Phillips encounter at the Lincoln Memorial (Jan. 25, 2019) https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/20/us/nathan-phillips-covington.html "

[Also here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/31/podcasts/still-processing-reality-green-book-r-kelly.html
https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-new-york-times/still-processing/e/58489768
https://player.fm/series/still-processing-1785512/reality ]
jennawortham  wesleymorris  reality  perception  belief  2019  canon 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
‘What Can You Believe If You Don’t Believe in God?’ – People's World
He admits as much toward the end of the book: “Europeans may not need church because they have been informed by a centuries old Humanist culture. Generally their Humanist community is the community at large. The European Western Enlightenment tradition of Humanism is deeply imbedded in their culture, unlike the United States where religion has been and is still a dominant force in our culture.” And a little further on:
religion  ideology  belief 
january 2019 by imaginaryfriend

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