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Measuring actual learning versus feeling of learning in response to being actively engaged in the classroom | PNAS
This article addresses the long-standing question of why students and faculty remain resistant to active learning. Comparing passive lectures with active learning using a randomized experimental approach and identical course materials, we find that students in the active classroom learn more, but they feel like they learn less. We show that this negative correlation is caused in part by the increased cognitive effort required during active learning.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21164005
study  org:nat  psychology  cog-psych  education  learning  studying  teaching  productivity  higher-ed  cost-benefit  aversion  🦉  growth  stamina  multi  hn  commentary  sentiment  thinking  neurons  wire-guided  emotion  subjective-objective  self-report  objective-measure 
5 weeks ago by nhaliday
Kahneman and Tversky’s “debatable” loss aversion assumption – Jason Collins blog
A nice little dig into the current status of loss aversion research replication — worth a read
cognitive  psychology  personality  loss  aversion  research 
9 weeks ago by adrianh
Why You Procrastinate (It Has Nothing to Do With Self-Control) - The New York Times
Excellent article about how emotions affect out tendency to procrastinate. Includes very good concrete suggestions for coping when aversion and negative emotions appear around a task.

HN discussion: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19482238
“People engage in this irrational cycle of chronic procrastination because of an inability to manage negative moods around a task.”
“Procrastination is an emotion regulation problem, not a time management problem.”
"But the momentary relief we feel when procrastinating is actually what makes the cycle especially vicious. In the immediate present, putting off a task provides relief — “you’ve been rewarded for procrastinating,”
procrastination  aversion  emotions  psychology  productivity  motivation 
march 2019 by Styrke
No hugging: are we living through a crisis of touch? | Society | The Guardian
“We have demonised touch to a level at which it sparks off hysterical responses, it sparks off legislative processes, and this lack of touch is not good for mental health.” 

optimum speed of a human caress is 3cm to 5cm a second

when the skin is moved, pressure receptors are stimulated,” she says. This “slows down heart rate, blood pressure and the release of cortisol”, which gives people better control over their stress hormones.

Being touched increases the number of natural killer cells, “the frontline of the immune system. Serotonin increases. That’s the body’s natural antidepressant. It enables deeper sleep,”

the hankering for touch is so innate that an infant, removed from its mother, would cling to a cloth-covered wire surrogate rather than a cold wire one with milk. It would choose to feel nourished rather than be nourishedsays that loneliness is fatal precisely because it puts people “into a kind of defensive state where the levels of cortisol are raised“Humans have their strongest touch sensation at around 20, after which it goes down by a percent a year for your whole life”.

“kids are getting more and more aggressive because there is less and less touch”.

“This is what I’m concerned about,” McGlone says. “If this evolutionary system is in any way disturbed or interrupted, brains are good at finding compensation. It could be drugs or alcohol ... If you remove a reward system, the brain will try to find some other way to get that reward.”

Humans love touch. We love it so much that the word has the power to sell a heap of products from soft-touch pillows to velvet touch tights

There is a hypervigilance of boundaries that makes it hard to find the right approach. “I think twice about hugging a colleague at work in a way that I didn’t a couple of years ago,” Linden says. “I’m thinking, maybe this is going to be misinterpreted. Maybe this is going to make somebody feel bad.

”Fortes Mayer advises against “energetically leaning forward for a hug”. She dislikes the phrases “Do you want a hug?”, “Give us a hug” and “Can I have a hug?”; they are “all too, ‘Who takes ownership here?’” (This is the mistake Kesha made with Jerry Seinfeld.) She suggests instead, “Would you like to share a hug?”
touch  aversion  society  culture  USA  UK 
march 2018 by dandv
How to train your tastebuds and other tips for your tongue - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
For example, someone who dislikes bananas should eat them daily over a two-week period in different forms: mashed, whole and with other foods.
food  taste  aversion 
july 2017 by omnipotus
The Behavioral Econ of Paperwork, Bryan Caplan | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty
If X is good, we can noticeably encourage it by modestly simplifying the paperwork. So yes, cut red tape for employment, construction, travel, and adoption. If X is bad, though, we can noticeably discourage it by modestly complicating the paperwork. Indeed, complexity is a viable substitute for explicit means-testing: If you lack the patience to fill out ten forms, you probably don't really need the money.
econotariat  org:econlib  cracker-econ  proposal  economics  behavioral-econ  policy  political-econ  regulation  intricacy  aversion 
june 2017 by nhaliday
New studies show the cost of student laptop use in lecture classes - Daniel Willingham
In-lecture media use and academic performance: Does subject area matter: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563217304983
The study found that while a significant negative correlation exists between in-lecture media use and academic performance for students in the Arts and Social Sciences, the same pattern is not observable for students in the faculties of Engineering, Economic and Management Sciences, and Medical and Health Sciences.

hmm

Why you should take notes by hand — not on a laptop: https://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop
Presumably, they're using the computers to take notes, so they better remember the course material. But new research shows that if learning is their goal, using a laptop during class is a terrible idea.

It's not just because internet-connected laptops are so distracting. It's because even if students aren't distracted, the act of taking notes on a computer actually seems to interfere with their ability to remember information.

Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer, the psychologists who conducted the new research, believe it's because students on laptops usually just mindlessly type everything a professor says. Those taking notes by hand, though, have to actively listen and decide what's important — because they generally can't write fast enough to get everything down — which ultimately helps them learn.

The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking: https://linguistics.ucla.edu/people/hayes/Teaching/papers/MuellerAndOppenheimer2014OnTakingNotesByHand.pdf
scitariat  education  higher-ed  learning  data  study  summary  intervention  internet  attention  field-study  effect-size  studying  regularizer  aversion  the-monster  multi  cost-benefit  notetaking  evidence-based  news  org:lite  org:data  hi-order-bits  synthesis  spreading  contiguity-proximity 
april 2017 by nhaliday
The Relation of Toxoplasma Infection and Sexual Attraction to Fear, Danger, Pain, and Submissiveness - Jul 28, 2016
A cross-sectional cohort study performed on 36,564 subjects (5,087 Toxoplasma free and 741 Toxoplasma infected) showed that infected and noninfected subjects differ in their sexual behavior, fantasies, and preferences when age, health, and the size of the place where they spent childhood were controlled (F(24, 3719) = 2.800, p < .0001). In agreement with our a priori hypothesis, infected subjects are more often aroused by their own fear, danger, and sexual submission although they practice more conventional sexual activities than Toxoplasma-free subjects. We suggest that the later changes can be related to a decrease in the personality trait of novelty seeking in infected subjects, which is potentially a side effect of increased concentration of dopamine in their brain.
study  bio  sapiens  disease  parasites-microbiome  neuro  psychiatry  sex  embodied  🌞  nature  biodet  evopsych  psychology  neuro-nitgrit  intervention  science-anxiety  toxo-gondii  emotion  sexuality  behavioral-gen  public-health  solid-study  aversion 
march 2017 by nhaliday
10 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Moving into Management - by @kellblog
"Everybody loves yes-people managers except, of course, the people who work for them. While saying yes to the boss and internal customers feels good, you will run your team ragged if you lack the backbone to say no when you need to. If you can’t say no to a bad idea or offer up reprioritization options when the team is red-lining, then don’t go into management. Saying no is an important part of the job."
culture  entrepreneurship  leadership  management  startups  coaching  communication  conflict  aversion  first-time  manager  teaching 
march 2017 by jonerp
The malicious serpent: Evolved adaptations for responding to snakes
Instinctive Fears: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2014/12/07/instinctive-fears/
It is easier to develop a phobia about snakes than electricity or carbon monoxide, probably because we have built in neurological mechanism that confer that propensity.

Likely most animals have a similar propensity to develop a fear of fire: or it might come automatically. If there was such a fear-of-fire mechanism, we have lost it: and dogs have as well. If this is correct, one could learn about this hypothetical mechanism by comparing dogs and wolves.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2014/12/07/instinctive-fears/#comment-63880
Apparently nobody knows this anymore, but many animals do indeed fear fire, enough so that a fire gives significant protection in predator-rich places like Africa. Most of the world, back in the day. So you don’t need to wonder whether selection could create such an instinct – it already has.

Wolves fear fire. Dogs don’t – they like to hang out around the campfire.
org:edu  evopsych  psychology  cog-psych  eden  nature  sapiens  evolution  roots  deep-materialism  emotion  org:junk  multi  westminster  scitariat  speculation  ideas  instinct  recent-selection  fire  technology  west-hunter  domestication  poast  survival  outdoors  africa  farmers-and-foragers  aversion 
february 2017 by nhaliday

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