_windows_7_   43

10 Things You Must Do With Your New Windows 7 PC [Windows 7]
If you got a new Windows 7 laptop for Christmas, you are truly in luck. But here are 10 things you need to get the most out of it.
1. Take a Spin Around the New Interface: Still glassy, glossy and damn near glittery, the Windows 7 interface is actually a major progression for Microsoft: It's not just easy to use, it's a whole new paradigm with the revamped taskbar and Aero Peek making multitasking with multiple windows more natural than ever.
2. Turn Off Everything You Don't Need: While Windows 7 is missing some odd things, like a mail application, the flip side is that you can turn off pretty much every major feature you don't want. Internet Exploder 8? Gone. Windows Media Player? Poof. And if you're used to tweaking the crap out of Windows, you still can—a lot of the old tricks, like for manipulating context menus, still work.
3. Move All Your Crap from Your Old Machine: Windows 7 actually has pretty decent built-in powers for moving all your crap from your old and busted PC to your new pride and joy, though you need to download Windows Easy Transfer separately onto XP if you're pulling stuff from that.
4. Master All of the New Keyboard Shortcuts: Why deal with flipping around a mouse or scribbling on a trackpad when you do the same thing in a tenth of a second with a keyboard combo? The Start key (oh sorry, Windows key), which I've always neglected as a useless monotasker, is supremely useful in Windows 7, as the underpinning for a metric ton of keyboard shortcuts.
5. Get It to Play Nice With All of Your Gadgets: The good news about Windows 7 is that, unlike Vista, most of your gear that worked with your computer a couple years ago with Windows should still work. And newer gear interacts with Windows in a fancy new way with a big ol' splash graphic and easy access to all the stuff you'd wanna do with it. While even simple things, like adding a second monitor, are more straightforward now, here's a device-by-device breakdown on getting everything to touch Windows 7 appropriately.
6. Share Stuff With Your Other Computers, 'Cause It's Easier Now: The networking UI hasn't just gotten a facelift to make it more accessible, it's actually easier to use with HomeGroups—join a HomeGroup, and all of the stuff you want to share with other computers spreads like herpes to the rest of the HomeGroup, no arduous networking required. Also, network in general—like with Macs—seems to just work better with Windows 7.
7. Stream Your Music and Videos Everywhere: Connecting your PC to a TV sounds so 1999. Well, you might not know this, but your Windows 7 PC is a badass music and video streamer, DVR, photo viewer, video aggregator and everything else you'd want out of a multimedia box, all thanks to Windows Media Center. The living room PC is legit now. Not to mention Play To, which beams music (and video and photos) to any compatible device on your network, no setup required (really!). All it takes it a right-click, and those Sonos speakers on the other side of your house will magically start yelling the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
8. Upgrade Your Netbook to Windows 7 Home Premium: If you got a Windows 7 netbook, there's a good chance you got stuck with the artificially gimped out Starter edition, which sucks. The cheapest way to fix this is to buy Windows 7 for $30 using a valid .edu email address, then follow our guide to installing Windows 7 on any netbook.
9. Set Up Some Network Storage: A fresh computer is a fresh start—meaning it's a perfect time to start a new life with fully networked storage for backup, especially if you're using your machine as a DVR with Windows Media Center. (But skip on faster drives.) One awesome option? A Windows Home Server machine, which can do backups and stream out media to all of your computers.
10. Remote Control It From Anywhere with VNC: While diving deep into the system and futzing with your network at the same time, you might as well set up a VNC server so you can control your computer from anywhere, whether it's to pull files or schedule downloads.
That's it from us. Share your own tips and tricks in the comments, and Merry Christmas!
_windows_7_  Feature  Microsoft  Top  Windows  from google
december 2009 by stallmer
ISO Downloads and Fixes for Windows 7 Student Download [Windows 7]
A friend of mine, and many commenters here and elsewhere, had issues receiving, downloading, or simply executing the $30 "student" Windows 7 upgrade. Microsoft has admitted some issues, and now offers tools for getting your upgrade done.
Assuming you've picked up your license from a valid .edu address, you can burn the ISO image below to disk and execute the upgrade on an XP or Vista system. The executable file linked below can convert the previous installation program you've received into a bootable DVD or USB image. And Microsoft and its Digital River partner offer full instructions on pulling off both such procedures at the top link.
Note: The ISO download appears to be a Home Premium upgrade image; if you grabbed a Professional upgrade from the student discount page, head to the bottom link and look up your image location.
Upgrade Instructions [Microsoft/Digital River] ISO file [Direct ISO link] Bootable DVD/USB creator [Direct .exe link]
_windows_7_  DVD  ISO  Top  Troubleshooting  Upgrade  Upgrades  Windows  from google
october 2009 by jermspeaks
ISO Downloads and Fixes for Windows 7 Student Download [Windows 7]
A friend of mine, and many commenters here and elsewhere, had issues receiving, downloading, or simply executing the $30 "student" Windows 7 upgrade. Microsoft has admitted some issues, and now offers tools for getting your upgrade done.
Assuming you've picked up your license from a valid .edu address, you can burn the ISO image below to disk and execute the upgrade on an XP or Vista system. The executable file linked below can convert the previous installation program you've received into a bootable DVD or USB image. And Microsoft and its Digital River partner offer full instructions on pulling off both such procedures at the top link.
Note: The ISO download appears to be a Home Premium upgrade image; if you grabbed a Professional upgrade from the student discount page, head to the bottom link and look up your image location.
Upgrade Instructions [Microsoft/Digital River] ISO file [Direct ISO link] Bootable DVD/USB creator [Direct .exe link]
_windows_7_  DVD  ISO  Top  Troubleshooting  Upgrade  Upgrades  Windows  from google
october 2009 by pleitch
The Master List of New Windows 7 Shortcuts [Windows 7]
Windows 7 adds loads of great shortcuts for switching between apps, moving windows around your screen, moving them to another monitor altogether, and much more. Here's a quick-reference master list of the best new Windows 7 shortcuts.
We're nuts for keyboard shortcuts here at Lifehacker, and Windows 7 brings a handful of great new ones to add to your muscle memory. It's also got a few handy mouse-based shortcuts you'd do well to add to your repertoire. So let's get shortcuttin'.
Window Management Shortcuts One of the best changes in Windows 7 is the ability to "snap" windows to the side of the screen, maximize them by dragging to the top of the screen, or even move them to another monitor with a shortcut key. Check out the video for a demonstration of how some of the keys work. The full list of keyboard shortcuts includes:
Win+Home: Clear all but the active window. Win+Space: All windows become transparent so you can see through to the desktop. Win+Up arrow: Maximize the active window. Shift+Win+Up arrow: Maximize the active window vertically. Win+Down arrow: Minimize the window/Restore the window if it's maximized. Win+Left/Right arrows: Dock the window to each side of the monitor. Shift+Win+Left/Right arrows: Move the window to the monitor on the left or right. You can also interact with windows by dragging them with the mouse:
Drag window to the top: Maximize Drag window left/right: Dock the window to fill half of the screen. Shake window back/forth: Minimize everything but the current window. Double-Click Top Window Border (edge): Maximize window vertically. Taskbar Shortcuts In Windows 7, using the Windows key along with the numbers 1-9 will let you interact with the applications pinned to the taskbar in those positions – for example, the Windows key + 4 combination would launch Outlook in this example, or Win+Alt+4 can be used to get quick access to the Outlook Jump List from the keyboard.
You can use any of these shortcut combinations to launch the applications in their respective position on the taskbar, or more:
Win+number (1-9): Starts the application pinned to the taskbar in that position, or switches to that program. Shift+Win+number (1-9): Starts a new instance of the application pinned to the taskbar in that position. Ctrl+Win+number (1-9): Cycles through open windows for the application pinned to the taskbar in that position. Alt+Win+number (1-9): Opens the Jump List for the application pinned to the taskbar. Win+T: Focus and scroll through items on the taskbar. Win+B: Focuses the System Tray icons In addition, you can interact with the taskbar using your mouse and a modifier key: Shift+Click on a taskbar button: Open a program or quickly open another instance of a program. Ctrl+Shift+Click on a taskbar button: Open a program as an administrator. Shift+Right-click on a taskbar button: Show the window menu for the program (like XP does). Shift+Right-click on a grouped taskbar button: Show the window menu for the group. Ctrl+Click on a grouped taskbar button: Cycle through the windows of the group. More Useful Hotkeys You Should Know The new hotkey goodness didn't stop with the taskbar and moving windows around—one of the best new hotkeys in Windows 7 is the fact that you can create a new folder with a hotkey. Just open up any Windows Explorer window, hit the Ctrl+Shift+N shortcut key sequence, and you'll be rewarded with a shiny "New Folder" ready for you to rename.
Here's a few more interesting hotkeys for you:
Ctrl+Shift+N: Creates a new folder in Windows Explorer. Alt+Up: Goes up a folder level in Windows Explorer. Alt+P: Toggles the preview pane in Windows Explorer. Shift+Right-Click on a file: Adds Copy as Path, which copies the path of a file to the clipboard. Shift+Right-Click on a file: Adds extra hidden items to the Send To menu. Shift+Right-Click on a folder: Adds Command Prompt Here, which lets you easily open a command prompt in that folder. Win+P: Adjust presentation settings for your display. Win+(+/-): Zoom in/out. Win+G: Cycle between the Windows Gadgets on your screen. Windows 7 definitely makes it a lot easier to interact with your PC from your keyboard—so what are your favorite shortcuts, and how do they save you time? Share your experience in the comments. The How-To Geek is quickly wearing out the keyboard on his new Windows 7 laptop. His geeky articles can be found daily here on Lifehacker, How-To Geek, and Twitter.
_windows_7_  Aero  aero_snap  Feature  Hotkeys  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Timesavers  Top  Window_Management  Windows 
october 2009 by mclamb
The Master List of New Windows 7 Shortcuts [Windows 7]
Windows 7 adds loads of great shortcuts for switching between apps, moving windows around your screen, moving them to another monitor altogether, and much more. Here's a quick-reference master list of the best new Windows 7 shortcuts.
We're nuts for keyboard shortcuts here at Lifehacker, and Windows 7 brings a handful of great new ones to add to your muscle memory. It's also got a few handy mouse-based shortcuts you'd do well to add to your repertoire. So let's get shortcuttin'.
Window Management Shortcuts One of the best changes in Windows 7 is the ability to "snap" windows to the side of the screen, maximize them by dragging to the top of the screen, or even move them to another monitor with a shortcut key. Check out the video for a demonstration of how some of the keys work. The full list of keyboard shortcuts includes:
Win+Home: Clear all but the active window. Win+Space: All windows become transparent so you can see through to the desktop. Win+Up arrow: Maximize the active window. Shift+Win+Up arrow: Maximize the active window vertically. Win+Down arrow: Minimize the window/Restore the window if it's maximized. Win+Left/Right arrows: Dock the window to each side of the monitor. Shift+Win+Left/Right arrows: Move the window to the monitor on the left or right. You can also interact with windows by dragging them with the mouse:
Drag window to the top: Maximize Drag window left/right: Dock the window to fill half of the screen. Shake window back/forth: Minimize everything but the current window. Double-Click Top Window Border (edge): Maximize window vertically. Taskbar Shortcuts In Windows 7, using the Windows key along with the numbers 1-9 will let you interact with the applications pinned to the taskbar in those positions – for example, the Windows key + 4 combination would launch Outlook in this example, or Win+Alt+4 can be used to get quick access to the Outlook Jump List from the keyboard.
You can use any of these shortcut combinations to launch the applications in their respective position on the taskbar, or more:
Win+number (1-9): Starts the application pinned to the taskbar in that position, or switches to that program. Shift+Win+number (1-9): Starts a new instance of the application pinned to the taskbar in that position. Ctrl+Win+number (1-9): Cycles through open windows for the application pinned to the taskbar in that position. Alt+Win+number (1-9): Opens the Jump List for the application pinned to the taskbar. Win+T: Focus and scroll through items on the taskbar. Win+B: Focuses the System Tray icons In addition, you can interact with the taskbar using your mouse and a modifier key: Shift+Click on a taskbar button: Open a program or quickly open another instance of a program. Ctrl+Shift+Click on a taskbar button: Open a program as an administrator. Shift+Right-click on a taskbar button: Show the window menu for the program (like XP does). Shift+Right-click on a grouped taskbar button: Show the window menu for the group. Ctrl+Click on a grouped taskbar button: Cycle through the windows of the group. More Useful Hotkeys You Should Know The new hotkey goodness didn't stop with the taskbar and moving windows around—one of the best new hotkeys in Windows 7 is the fact that you can create a new folder with a hotkey. Just open up any Windows Explorer window, hit the Ctrl+Shift+N shortcut key sequence, and you'll be rewarded with a shiny "New Folder" ready for you to rename.
Here's a few more interesting hotkeys for you:
Ctrl+Shift+N: Creates a new folder in Windows Explorer. Alt+Up: Goes up a folder level in Windows Explorer. Alt+P: Toggles the preview pane in Windows Explorer. Shift+Right-Click on a file: Adds Copy as Path, which copies the path of a file to the clipboard. Shift+Right-Click on a file: Adds extra hidden items to the Send To menu. Shift+Right-Click on a folder: Adds Command Prompt Here, which lets you easily open a command prompt in that folder. Win+P: Adjust presentation settings for your display. Win+(+/-): Zoom in/out. Win+G: Cycle between the Windows Gadgets on your screen. Windows 7 definitely makes it a lot easier to interact with your PC from your keyboard—so what are your favorite shortcuts, and how do they save you time? Share your experience in the comments. The How-To Geek is quickly wearing out the keyboard on his new Windows 7 laptop. His geeky articles can be found daily here on Lifehacker, How-To Geek, and Twitter.
_windows_7_  Aero  aero_snap  Feature  Hotkeys  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Timesavers  Top  Window_Management  Windows  from google
october 2009 by bjourdan
The Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [Windows 7]
The final version of Windows 7 is being released this week to the general public, and after you get your hands on it the first thing you'll need to know is: Do all my tweaks still work?
If you haven't already made the switch over to Windows 7, be sure to check out our guide to upgrading to the Windows 7 RC, which should still be applicable for the final release. If you aren't sure whether you want to make the switch full-time, you can always setup a dual-boot with Vista or XP.

Disable Shortcut Icon Arrows This is one of those little annoyances that doesn't really affect functionality at all, but if you are worried about making your system look just right, you might want to get rid of the unseemly arrows that show up on any shortcut. There's loads of different methods to get rid of these icons—back in XP you could just use Tweak UI, but starting with Windows Vista you needed another application: the Vista Shortcut Overlay Remover. It still works in Windows 7, and is just about the simplest way to get rid of the arrows. Why this setting isn't built into Windows, I just don't know.
Disable Shortcut Icon Arrow Overlay in Windows 7 or Vista 
Add Defrag to the Right-Click Menu If you want to quickly defragment your drive, there's way too many clicks that you have to go through to start the defrag process—but you can use a simple tweak that adds defrag to the context menu for each drive. It's as simple as a little registry hack, which you can download and install without having to mess around in the registry yourself.
Add Defragment to the Right-Click Menu for a Drive

Create Shortcuts to Lock the Screen, Shutdown, Restart Microsoft keeps moving the shutdown buttons around with every new version of Windows, but it seems like people are still asking for shortcuts to shut down or restart the PC, and the good news is that the old tweak still works just fine on Windows 7. You can even assign a shortcut key to them if you choose, just make sure to put the shortcut on the start menu or desktop if you want the shortcut key to work.
Create Shutdown / Restart / Lock Icons in Windows 7 or Vista

Make Windows Log On Automatically When you are the only person using your PC at home, there's really not much reason to require a login every time you restart your computer. Luckily there's an easy way to make sure that Windows doesn't ask you for a password when you log on, using the netplwiz utility. Just uncheck the box that says "Users must enter a user name and password", enter your password in twice, and you won't have to login anymore.
Make Windows 7 or Vista Log On Automatically

Stop Windows Update from Automatically Restarting Your PC This is my personal pet peeve with Windows—you are right in the middle of a few dozen things, with a ton of applications open on your screen, and you come back to your computer only to find that your PC has restarted because Windows Update decided that rebooting that instant was more important than all that work you had on your screen. If you are sitting in front of your PC, you can always temporarily disable the automatic reboot, but there's another registry hack that will prevent it from happening in the first place.
Prevent Windows Update from Forcibly Rebooting Your Computer
Add Any Folder To Your Taskbar This tweak has worked on every version of Windows for a very long time, and even with the new taskbar in Windows 7, it still works perfectly. Just right-click on the taskbar, choose Toolbars –> New Toolbar, and pick the folder you'd like to add. You can make them icon-only, remove the label, or make them use large icons. You can even use this trick to add the Quick Launch folder back to Windows 7. 
Add "My Computer" to Your Windows 7 / Vista Taskbar
Add "Take Ownership" to the Context Menu If you were rocking an administrator account on Windows XP, you pretty much had access to do anything you wanted, but since Vista, Windows made it extremely difficult to change files and folders in any of the system directories. To easily solve this problem, there's a simple little registry hack that will add a "Take Ownership" item to the context menu, after which you can rename, delete, or do whatever you'd like.
Add "Take Ownership" to Explorer Right-Click Menu in Win 7 or Vista
Add Copy/Move to the Context Menu Sure, there are loads of ways to copy  or move files around in Windows, but there's one simple little registry hack that will add a "Copy To folder" and "Move To folder" option to the context menu. Once you've added them to the menu, you can pop up a dialog box that lets you easily choose a folder to move or copy the items to—it's one of those great little hacks that's been around forever, and still works in Windows 7.
Add Copy To / Move To on Windows 7 or Vista Right-Click Menu
Disable the Caps Lock Key The Caps Lock key is by far my least favorite key on the keyboard—at least the scroll lock key doesn't interfere with my typing when I hit it by accident. Thankfully it's easy enough to get rid of with a simple registry hack, or you can map any key to any key using an easy freeware utility. If you'd rather not disable it, you can instead use Caps Lock as a keyboard-friendly navigation tool or turn it into a dedicated minimize button.
Disable Caps Lock Key in Windows 7 or Vista 
Stop Losing the Sleep/Shutdown Button to Windows Update So you're rushing to finish up that TPS report so you can duck out early and avoid Lumberg asking you to work on the weekend, only to realize that Windows hijacked your Sleep/Shutdown button and is now slowly installing updates for the next twenty minutes or so. Thankfully there's another simple registry hack that will prevent Windows from changing out your regular shutdown button with the install updates variety.
Stop Windows Update from Hijacking the Sleep Button
Enable Remote Desktop Remote Desktop doesn't come with all the flavors of Windows—you can only use it if you are running the Ultimate, Pro, or Business editions. If you are using one of those versions and want an excellent way to control the PC in the other room, Remote Desktop is where it's at—in Windows 7 or Vista it will even enable Aero through the Remote Desktop session. To enable for yourself, simply head into System properties, choose Remote Settings, and then change the radio button to enable it.
Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable Sticky / Filter Keys Dialogs Have you ever been playing a game, or doing something else that required pressing the Shift or Ctrl keys a bunch of times, and then had the "Do you want to turn on Sticky Keys?" question pop up on your screen? It might be a great feature for some people, but it's not useful for the rest of us—and it's really annoying. Thankfully you can disable the keyboard shortcuts entirely by heading into the Control Panel's Ease of Access center and looking under the keyboard section.
Disable the Irritating Sticky / Filter Keys Popup Dialogs

Disable Windows Explorer Click Sounds Ever noticed that every time you double-click on anything in Windows Explorer, it makes an annoying clicking sound? If you do a lot of file management, this sound can quickly drive you batty. Thankfully there's a really simple way to disable it—just head into the Sounds panel and find the item called "Start Navigation" in the list. Once you've disabled that sound, you should be finally free of the irritation. 
Turn Off Windows Explorer Click Sounds in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable User Account Control's Annoying Prompts UAC has noble intentions, but for power users who know what they're doing, they can be extremely annoying. Windows 7 makes it so much easier to get rid of those annoying prompts than Vista—you can simply head into Control Panel, find the UAC settings panel, and then drag the slider to fit the level of annoyance you feel like dealing with. If you'd rather keep UAC enabled but want to prevent the prompts for a particular application, you can always create shortcuts that bypass the UAC prompts with a simple task scheduler trick.
Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or Vista
These are just a few of the many Windows tweaks that still work in Windows 7. Do you have a can't-live-without tweak that you want to still use in Windows 7? Tell us in the comments. The 20 Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [How-To Geek]
_windows_7_  Annoyances  Customization  Desktop  Feature  Hacks  Tips  Top  Tweaks  Windows 
october 2009 by mclamb
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows 
october 2009 by mclamb
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows  from google
october 2009 by jermspeaks
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows  from google
october 2009 by 9diov
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows  from google
october 2009 by adrian.andreca
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows  from google
october 2009 by DesireeD
Lifehacker's Complete Guide to Windows 7 [Windows 7]
Windows 7 officially launches today, but we've been testing, tweaking, customizing, fixing, and writing about this OS for a year now. We present here a guide to everything we've learned about the OS, from first install to final settings change.
Whether you've played around with Windows 7 during its beta or release candidate versions, launch day is finally here, and Windows 7 is finally ready for widespread, public consumption. This guide will take you straight through from system requirements and upgrading your PC to highlighting Windows 7's best new features to helping you hit the ground running with all of the awesome tweaks Windows 7 has in store for you.
System Requirements According to Microsoft:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor 1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Buying, installing, and upgrading Figure Out Which Windows 7 Edition Has the Features You Need: Not everybody needs Windows 7 Ultimate, but what if there's a certain feature you must have when you grab your upgrade this Thursday? CNET breaks down each Windows 7 edition feature by feature in a handy chart. Prep Your PC for Windows 7: When Windows 7 drops this Thursday, you can either spend many, many hours watching a progress bar, or you can boot into a clean, speedy system with that new-OS smell. Let's get your system set up for a proper Windows 7 upgrade. Get Windows 7 Home Premium for $30 With a College Email Address: If you're a U.S. college student, or at least having a working .edu email address, you don't have to pay $120 to upgrade Vista to Windows 7. You can get the Home Premium upgrade for just $30. Run Windows 7 for 120 Days Without Activation: The command line code (slmgr -rearm) that could be entered at the end of three different 30-day periods to give Vista 120 days without activation works just the same in Windows 7. Our take on Windows 7 Top 10 Things to Look Forward to in Windows 7: Windows 7 isn't a dramatic overhaul of its predecessor Windows Vista, but it does fix several sore spots and add a few welcome features. Windows 7's Best Underhyped Features: It's these less sexy, but very useful features, that make me think the more I use Windows 7, the less chance I'll ever use Vista or XP again. Windows 7 Versus Mac OS X Leopard: The Feature-by-Feature Showdown: Oh, I know: the Mac versus PC debate is so played out. Perhaps, but dumb commercials aside, if you're deciding between buying a Mac or a PC in the coming months, it helps to know what you're getting from one or the other. New features Windows 7 Tells You Why You Can't Touch That File: Windows 7 doesn't just give you a wagging finger (and pretend-useful "Try Again" button) when you want to move or delete a file that's in use. It actually tells you which application is using the file. Windows 7 Lets You Customize Your Logon Background: Expert Windows hacker Rafael Rivera finds a change in the latest build of Windows 7—you can finally customize the log-on screen natively. Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily: To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive. How to Burn ISOs in Windows 7: Burning that ISO to a disc is as simple as: 1. Double-click the ISO file (or right-click and select Burn disc image); 2. Click Burn. Play Your iPod Through Your Windows 7 PC's Speakers: You can play an external audio device through your computer's speakers without any extra software using a simple configuration setting. Windows 7 Makes UAC Less Annoying Than Vista: The biggest change in Windows 7 is the new User Account Control "slider" setting, where you can choose your own balance between annoyance and security—but behind the scenes, Microsoft reduced the amount of actions that will prompt you. Netflix Update Comes to Windows 7 Media Center, Looks Excellent: Starting this week, Microsoft is rolling out an upgraded Watch Instantly interface to Windows 7 Media Center for users looking to get their streaming TV and movie fix on their upgraded PCs. Setup File and Printer Sharing From XP to Windows 7: This guide walks you through the process of enabling network discovery, sharing your folders and printers, and accessing your shared resources from either Windows 7 or XP. IE8 Can Proactively Close Crashing Tabs in Windows 7: The copy of IE8 found only in (Windows 7) has a "timer" that monitors new tabs as they open. If they aren't responsive within a relatively short amount of time, the browser will pop up and tell you this, possibly with a reason why, and ask whether you want to wait or kill the tab before it causes further problems. Windows 7 Lets You Finally Uninstall Internet Explorer (Kinda): ... It won't completely uninstall—only the executable is actually removed. Still, being able to finally banish IE proper from your system is a pretty good start for folks who really don't like IE. Windows 7 Will Let You Uninstall Most Built-In Apps: You can turn almost every built-in application on or off, including Windows Search, Gadgets, and even Media Player. The Taskbar Aero Peek: Peek supercharges Windows' taskbar thumbnail previews, and lets you view, close, and switch between multiple windows by just hovering over the taskbar thumbnail, as well as pin programs to the taskbar permanently. Pin Individual Folders to the Windows 7 Taskbar: Windows 7's taskbar lets you pin any running program to the taskbar for easy future access, but it treats folders like second-class sub-items of the Explorer icon. Create a fake "program" to pin individual folder shortcuts to your taskbar. Middle-Click to Close Applications from Windows 7's Taskbar: In Windows 7, middle-clicking a taskbar button opens a new program instance. The easy solution for closing an app? Middle-click its preview window. Hold Shift While Dragging to Windows 7 Taskbar to Open Files: All you have to do is hold down the Shift key while dragging a file to an icon on the taskbar, and the tooltip will change to say "Open with" instead of pinning to the taskbar. Pin Any Item to the Windows 7 Taskbar: We already showed you how to pin specific folders, and this is just a slightly tweaked application of that method. Put a Recycle Bin Shortcut on the Windows 7 Taskbar: Once you are finished, you'll have a separate recycle icon on the taskbar—useful for quick access to deleted files without having to hunt down an icon on your desktop. Get a Functional Recycle Bin on Windows 7's Taskbar: TechSpot's solution—creating a Quick Launch taskbar, removing its text and title, then bringing the desktop Recycle Bin icon into it—covers all the bases, and lets you place your Recycle Bin pretty much wherever you'd like on the taskbar. Jump lists Master Windows 7 Jump Lists to Boost Your Win7 Productivity: For those of you that haven't yet tried out Windows 7, when you right-click on a taskbar button in Windows 7, a menu slides out with recent documents and application tasks. Here's a rundown of our favorite Jump List boosters. Winfox Adds Jump Lists to Firefox on Windows 7: Jump Lists are one of the best new features in Windows 7, and since Firefox still doesn't take advantage of them, a small utility called Winfox adds the feature for you. Win7shell Adds Windows 7 Jump List Support to Winamp: Once you've downloaded, installed the plugin, and pinned Winamp to the taskbar, the Jump List should immediately start tracking your recently played media files. Built-in Applications Set Up and Use XP Mode in Windows 7: Windows 7's new XP Mode lets you seamlessly run virtualized applications alongside your regular Windows 7 applications—so your outdated software will continue to work. Calculator: While mathletes, scientists, coders, and statisticians will appreciate Windows 7's built-in calculator's programmer, statistics, and scientific modes, everyday people will love figuring out things like hourly wages and mortgage payments without a spreadsheet. PowerShell: (A) souped-up command line and scripting GUI that frees you, finally, from the limits of DOS batch scripts. Windows 7 Media Center's Music Player Is Hot Hot Hot: Good news for music lovers excited for Windows 7: The new and improved music interface in Windows 7 Media Center is overflowing with eye candy and usability. Windows 7's WordPad Opens Word 2007 DOCX Files: ... The ribbon-style WordPad in Windows 2007 opens Word 2007 files, the .docx kind, pretty handily, albeit with some formatting loss. Backup and Restore Center: For the average user with both media and crucial file needs, Windows 7's default backup features look promising. Windows 7 Guest Mode Creates Bomb-Proof Accounts: In the simplest terms, Guest Mode takes a snapshot of how a PC was working before the kid, friend, coffeeshop customer, or whoever else is using the Guest Mode account logs on. That user can't do much to alter the system, and whatever they can do, like dropping files on the desktop, is discarded when they log off. Windows 7 Calibration and ClearType Tools Fine-Tune Your Displays: Windows 7's color calibration and ClearType tools might be good enough for non-graphic-designers to stick with. Themes, wallpapers, and login screens Windows 7 Beta's Many Free and Legit Themes: Microsoft is offering 20 fresh themes (in Windows 7). Here's a closer look. Grab Every Region's Windows 7 Wallpapers in One Download: Microsoft allowed Windows Vista Magazine to bundle up every wallpaper from Windows 7's regional releases and, boy, we're glad they did. One file brings a lot of new looks to any desktop, Windows 7 or otherwise. Secret Registry Hack Customizes Windows 7 Logon "Button Set": Rafael Rivera, the same expert Windows hacker that figured out how to customize your Windows 7 logon background, finds another hack that changes … [more]
_windows_7_  Customization  customizations  Desktop  Feature  Jump_Lists  Keyboard  Keyboard_Shortcuts  Mouse  Mouse_gestures  Operating_Systems  Printing  Taskbar  Themes  Top  Upgrade  Upgrades  Wallpaper  Windows  from google
october 2009 by bjourdan
Access a Windows 7 Installation in Mac OS X with VirtualBox [Windows 7]
Tech thinker Anil Dash gets "uncharacteristically nerdy" and breaks down the process he used to install Windows 7 in Boot Camp—and then get access to it from OS X, without rebooting, using the free virtualization software VirtualBox.
This isn't installing Windows 7 by itself into a new VirtualBox image/appliance—it's taking the hard disk installation made with Boot Camp and making it accessible from VirtualBox in OS X. It's only two terminal commands on top of the standard VirtualBox setup and startup, and it's a pretty handy tool for quickly opening a Windows 7 program you need or testing out a web site in a Windows-only browser. Hit the link for Dash's quick run-through, and tell us if you've got any additional VirtualBox-on-Mac tips in the comments.
How to run Windows 7 under Mac OS X 10.6 for free [Anil Dash]
_windows_7_  Boot_Camp  Mac_OS_X  Top  Virtual_Desktops  Virtual_Disk  Virtual_Machine  VirtualBox  from google
october 2009 by freerangemonkey
Access a Windows 7 Installation in Mac OS X with VirtualBox [Windows 7]
Tech thinker Anil Dash gets "uncharacteristically nerdy" and breaks down the process he used to install Windows 7 in Boot Camp—and then get access to it from OS X, without rebooting, using the free virtualization software VirtualBox.
This isn't installing Windows 7 by itself into a new VirtualBox image/appliance—it's taking the hard disk installation made with Boot Camp and making it accessible from VirtualBox in OS X. It's only two terminal commands on top of the standard VirtualBox setup and startup, and it's a pretty handy tool for quickly opening a Windows 7 program you need or testing out a web site in a Windows-only browser. Hit the link for Dash's quick run-through, and tell us if you've got any additional VirtualBox-on-Mac tips in the comments.
How to run Windows 7 under Mac OS X 10.6 for free [Anil Dash]
_windows_7_  Boot_Camp  Mac_OS_X  Top  Virtual_Desktops  Virtual_Disk  Virtual_Machine  VirtualBox  from google
october 2009 by aaronmfraser
The Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [Windows 7]
The final version of Windows 7 is being released this week to the general public, and after you get your hands on it the first thing you'll need to know is: Do all my tweaks still work?
If you haven't already made the switch over to Windows 7, be sure to check out our guide to upgrading to the Windows 7 RC, which should still be applicable for the final release. If you aren't sure whether you want to make the switch full-time, you can always setup a dual-boot with Vista or XP.

Disable Shortcut Icon Arrows This is one of those little annoyances that doesn't really affect functionality at all, but if you are worried about making your system look just right, you might want to get rid of the unseemly arrows that show up on any shortcut. There's loads of different methods to get rid of these icons—back in XP you could just use Tweak UI, but starting with Windows Vista you needed another application: the Vista Shortcut Overlay Remover. It still works in Windows 7, and is just about the simplest way to get rid of the arrows. Why this setting isn't built into Windows, I just don't know.
Disable Shortcut Icon Arrow Overlay in Windows 7 or Vista 
Add Defrag to the Right-Click Menu If you want to quickly defragment your drive, there's way too many clicks that you have to go through to start the defrag process—but you can use a simple tweak that adds defrag to the context menu for each drive. It's as simple as a little registry hack, which you can download and install without having to mess around in the registry yourself.
Add Defragment to the Right-Click Menu for a Drive

Create Shortcuts to Lock the Screen, Shutdown, Restart Microsoft keeps moving the shutdown buttons around with every new version of Windows, but it seems like people are still asking for shortcuts to shut down or restart the PC, and the good news is that the old tweak still works just fine on Windows 7. You can even assign a shortcut key to them if you choose, just make sure to put the shortcut on the start menu or desktop if you want the shortcut key to work.
Create Shutdown / Restart / Lock Icons in Windows 7 or Vista

Make Windows Log On Automatically When you are the only person using your PC at home, there's really not much reason to require a login every time you restart your computer. Luckily there's an easy way to make sure that Windows doesn't ask you for a password when you log on, using the netplwiz utility. Just uncheck the box that says "Users must enter a user name and password", enter your password in twice, and you won't have to login anymore.
Make Windows 7 or Vista Log On Automatically

Stop Windows Update from Automatically Restarting Your PC This is my personal pet peeve with Windows—you are right in the middle of a few dozen things, with a ton of applications open on your screen, and you come back to your computer only to find that your PC has restarted because Windows Update decided that rebooting that instant was more important than all that work you had on your screen. If you are sitting in front of your PC, you can always temporarily disable the automatic reboot, but there's another registry hack that will prevent it from happening in the first place.
Prevent Windows Update from Forcibly Rebooting Your Computer
Add Any Folder To Your Taskbar This tweak has worked on every version of Windows for a very long time, and even with the new taskbar in Windows 7, it still works perfectly. Just right-click on the taskbar, choose Toolbars –> New Toolbar, and pick the folder you'd like to add. You can make them icon-only, remove the label, or make them use large icons. You can even use this trick to add the Quick Launch folder back to Windows 7. 
Add "My Computer" to Your Windows 7 / Vista Taskbar
Add "Take Ownership" to the Context Menu If you were rocking an administrator account on Windows XP, you pretty much had access to do anything you wanted, but since Vista, Windows made it extremely difficult to change files and folders in any of the system directories. To easily solve this problem, there's a simple little registry hack that will add a "Take Ownership" item to the context menu, after which you can rename, delete, or do whatever you'd like.
Add "Take Ownership" to Explorer Right-Click Menu in Win 7 or Vista
Add Copy/Move to the Context Menu Sure, there are loads of ways to copy  or move files around in Windows, but there's one simple little registry hack that will add a "Copy To folder" and "Move To folder" option to the context menu. Once you've added them to the menu, you can pop up a dialog box that lets you easily choose a folder to move or copy the items to—it's one of those great little hacks that's been around forever, and still works in Windows 7.
Add Copy To / Move To on Windows 7 or Vista Right-Click Menu
Disable the Caps Lock Key The Caps Lock key is by far my least favorite key on the keyboard—at least the scroll lock key doesn't interfere with my typing when I hit it by accident. Thankfully it's easy enough to get rid of with a simple registry hack, or you can map any key to any key using an easy freeware utility. If you'd rather not disable it, you can instead use Caps Lock as a keyboard-friendly navigation tool or turn it into a dedicated minimize button.
Disable Caps Lock Key in Windows 7 or Vista 
Stop Losing the Sleep/Shutdown Button to Windows Update So you're rushing to finish up that TPS report so you can duck out early and avoid Lumberg asking you to work on the weekend, only to realize that Windows hijacked your Sleep/Shutdown button and is now slowly installing updates for the next twenty minutes or so. Thankfully there's another simple registry hack that will prevent Windows from changing out your regular shutdown button with the install updates variety.
Stop Windows Update from Hijacking the Sleep Button
Enable Remote Desktop Remote Desktop doesn't come with all the flavors of Windows—you can only use it if you are running the Ultimate, Pro, or Business editions. If you are using one of those versions and want an excellent way to control the PC in the other room, Remote Desktop is where it's at—in Windows 7 or Vista it will even enable Aero through the Remote Desktop session. To enable for yourself, simply head into System properties, choose Remote Settings, and then change the radio button to enable it.
Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable Sticky / Filter Keys Dialogs Have you ever been playing a game, or doing something else that required pressing the Shift or Ctrl keys a bunch of times, and then had the "Do you want to turn on Sticky Keys?" question pop up on your screen? It might be a great feature for some people, but it's not useful for the rest of us—and it's really annoying. Thankfully you can disable the keyboard shortcuts entirely by heading into the Control Panel's Ease of Access center and looking under the keyboard section.
Disable the Irritating Sticky / Filter Keys Popup Dialogs

Disable Windows Explorer Click Sounds Ever noticed that every time you double-click on anything in Windows Explorer, it makes an annoying clicking sound? If you do a lot of file management, this sound can quickly drive you batty. Thankfully there's a really simple way to disable it—just head into the Sounds panel and find the item called "Start Navigation" in the list. Once you've disabled that sound, you should be finally free of the irritation. 
Turn Off Windows Explorer Click Sounds in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable User Account Control's Annoying Prompts UAC has noble intentions, but for power users who know what they're doing, they can be extremely annoying. Windows 7 makes it so much easier to get rid of those annoying prompts than Vista—you can simply head into Control Panel, find the UAC settings panel, and then drag the slider to fit the level of annoyance you feel like dealing with. If you'd rather keep UAC enabled but want to prevent the prompts for a particular application, you can always create shortcuts that bypass the UAC prompts with a simple task scheduler trick.
Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or Vista
These are just a few of the many Windows tweaks that still work in Windows 7. Do you have a can't-live-without tweak that you want to still use in Windows 7? Tell us in the comments. The 20 Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [How-To Geek]
_windows_7_  Annoyances  Customization  Desktop  Feature  Hacks  Tips  Top  Tweaks  Windows  from google
october 2009 by stateless
The Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [Windows 7]
The final version of Windows 7 is being released this week to the general public, and after you get your hands on it the first thing you'll need to know is: Do all my tweaks still work?
If you haven't already made the switch over to Windows 7, be sure to check out our guide to upgrading to the Windows 7 RC, which should still be applicable for the final release. If you aren't sure whether you want to make the switch full-time, you can always setup a dual-boot with Vista or XP.

Disable Shortcut Icon Arrows This is one of those little annoyances that doesn't really affect functionality at all, but if you are worried about making your system look just right, you might want to get rid of the unseemly arrows that show up on any shortcut. There's loads of different methods to get rid of these icons—back in XP you could just use Tweak UI, but starting with Windows Vista you needed another application: the Vista Shortcut Overlay Remover. It still works in Windows 7, and is just about the simplest way to get rid of the arrows. Why this setting isn't built into Windows, I just don't know.
Disable Shortcut Icon Arrow Overlay in Windows 7 or Vista 
Add Defrag to the Right-Click Menu If you want to quickly defragment your drive, there's way too many clicks that you have to go through to start the defrag process—but you can use a simple tweak that adds defrag to the context menu for each drive. It's as simple as a little registry hack, which you can download and install without having to mess around in the registry yourself.
Add Defragment to the Right-Click Menu for a Drive

Create Shortcuts to Lock the Screen, Shutdown, Restart Microsoft keeps moving the shutdown buttons around with every new version of Windows, but it seems like people are still asking for shortcuts to shut down or restart the PC, and the good news is that the old tweak still works just fine on Windows 7. You can even assign a shortcut key to them if you choose, just make sure to put the shortcut on the start menu or desktop if you want the shortcut key to work.
Create Shutdown / Restart / Lock Icons in Windows 7 or Vista

Make Windows Log On Automatically When you are the only person using your PC at home, there's really not much reason to require a login every time you restart your computer. Luckily there's an easy way to make sure that Windows doesn't ask you for a password when you log on, using the netplwiz utility. Just uncheck the box that says "Users must enter a user name and password", enter your password in twice, and you won't have to login anymore.
Make Windows 7 or Vista Log On Automatically

Stop Windows Update from Automatically Restarting Your PC This is my personal pet peeve with Windows—you are right in the middle of a few dozen things, with a ton of applications open on your screen, and you come back to your computer only to find that your PC has restarted because Windows Update decided that rebooting that instant was more important than all that work you had on your screen. If you are sitting in front of your PC, you can always temporarily disable the automatic reboot, but there's another registry hack that will prevent it from happening in the first place.
Prevent Windows Update from Forcibly Rebooting Your Computer
Add Any Folder To Your Taskbar This tweak has worked on every version of Windows for a very long time, and even with the new taskbar in Windows 7, it still works perfectly. Just right-click on the taskbar, choose Toolbars –> New Toolbar, and pick the folder you'd like to add. You can make them icon-only, remove the label, or make them use large icons. You can even use this trick to add the Quick Launch folder back to Windows 7. 
Add "My Computer" to Your Windows 7 / Vista Taskbar
Add "Take Ownership" to the Context Menu If you were rocking an administrator account on Windows XP, you pretty much had access to do anything you wanted, but since Vista, Windows made it extremely difficult to change files and folders in any of the system directories. To easily solve this problem, there's a simple little registry hack that will add a "Take Ownership" item to the context menu, after which you can rename, delete, or do whatever you'd like.
Add "Take Ownership" to Explorer Right-Click Menu in Win 7 or Vista
Add Copy/Move to the Context Menu Sure, there are loads of ways to copy  or move files around in Windows, but there's one simple little registry hack that will add a "Copy To folder" and "Move To folder" option to the context menu. Once you've added them to the menu, you can pop up a dialog box that lets you easily choose a folder to move or copy the items to—it's one of those great little hacks that's been around forever, and still works in Windows 7.
Add Copy To / Move To on Windows 7 or Vista Right-Click Menu
Disable the Caps Lock Key The Caps Lock key is by far my least favorite key on the keyboard—at least the scroll lock key doesn't interfere with my typing when I hit it by accident. Thankfully it's easy enough to get rid of with a simple registry hack, or you can map any key to any key using an easy freeware utility. If you'd rather not disable it, you can instead use Caps Lock as a keyboard-friendly navigation tool or turn it into a dedicated minimize button.
Disable Caps Lock Key in Windows 7 or Vista 
Stop Losing the Sleep/Shutdown Button to Windows Update So you're rushing to finish up that TPS report so you can duck out early and avoid Lumberg asking you to work on the weekend, only to realize that Windows hijacked your Sleep/Shutdown button and is now slowly installing updates for the next twenty minutes or so. Thankfully there's another simple registry hack that will prevent Windows from changing out your regular shutdown button with the install updates variety.
Stop Windows Update from Hijacking the Sleep Button
Enable Remote Desktop Remote Desktop doesn't come with all the flavors of Windows—you can only use it if you are running the Ultimate, Pro, or Business editions. If you are using one of those versions and want an excellent way to control the PC in the other room, Remote Desktop is where it's at—in Windows 7 or Vista it will even enable Aero through the Remote Desktop session. To enable for yourself, simply head into System properties, choose Remote Settings, and then change the radio button to enable it.
Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable Sticky / Filter Keys Dialogs Have you ever been playing a game, or doing something else that required pressing the Shift or Ctrl keys a bunch of times, and then had the "Do you want to turn on Sticky Keys?" question pop up on your screen? It might be a great feature for some people, but it's not useful for the rest of us—and it's really annoying. Thankfully you can disable the keyboard shortcuts entirely by heading into the Control Panel's Ease of Access center and looking under the keyboard section.
Disable the Irritating Sticky / Filter Keys Popup Dialogs

Disable Windows Explorer Click Sounds Ever noticed that every time you double-click on anything in Windows Explorer, it makes an annoying clicking sound? If you do a lot of file management, this sound can quickly drive you batty. Thankfully there's a really simple way to disable it—just head into the Sounds panel and find the item called "Start Navigation" in the list. Once you've disabled that sound, you should be finally free of the irritation. 
Turn Off Windows Explorer Click Sounds in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable User Account Control's Annoying Prompts UAC has noble intentions, but for power users who know what they're doing, they can be extremely annoying. Windows 7 makes it so much easier to get rid of those annoying prompts than Vista—you can simply head into Control Panel, find the UAC settings panel, and then drag the slider to fit the level of annoyance you feel like dealing with. If you'd rather keep UAC enabled but want to prevent the prompts for a particular application, you can always create shortcuts that bypass the UAC prompts with a simple task scheduler trick.
Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or Vista
These are just a few of the many Windows tweaks that still work in Windows 7. Do you have a can't-live-without tweak that you want to still use in Windows 7? Tell us in the comments. The 20 Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [How-To Geek]
_windows_7_  Annoyances  Customization  Desktop  Feature  Hacks  Tips  Top  Tweaks  Windows  from google
october 2009 by backpedal
The Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [Windows 7]
The final version of Windows 7 is being released this week to the general public, and after you get your hands on it the first thing you'll need to know is: Do all my tweaks still work?
If you haven't already made the switch over to Windows 7, be sure to check out our guide to upgrading to the Windows 7 RC, which should still be applicable for the final release. If you aren't sure whether you want to make the switch full-time, you can always setup a dual-boot with Vista or XP.

Disable Shortcut Icon Arrows This is one of those little annoyances that doesn't really affect functionality at all, but if you are worried about making your system look just right, you might want to get rid of the unseemly arrows that show up on any shortcut. There's loads of different methods to get rid of these icons—back in XP you could just use Tweak UI, but starting with Windows Vista you needed another application: the Vista Shortcut Overlay Remover. It still works in Windows 7, and is just about the simplest way to get rid of the arrows. Why this setting isn't built into Windows, I just don't know.
Disable Shortcut Icon Arrow Overlay in Windows 7 or Vista 
Add Defrag to the Right-Click Menu If you want to quickly defragment your drive, there's way too many clicks that you have to go through to start the defrag process—but you can use a simple tweak that adds defrag to the context menu for each drive. It's as simple as a little registry hack, which you can download and install without having to mess around in the registry yourself.
Add Defragment to the Right-Click Menu for a Drive

Create Shortcuts to Lock the Screen, Shutdown, Restart Microsoft keeps moving the shutdown buttons around with every new version of Windows, but it seems like people are still asking for shortcuts to shut down or restart the PC, and the good news is that the old tweak still works just fine on Windows 7. You can even assign a shortcut key to them if you choose, just make sure to put the shortcut on the start menu or desktop if you want the shortcut key to work.
Create Shutdown / Restart / Lock Icons in Windows 7 or Vista

Make Windows Log On Automatically When you are the only person using your PC at home, there's really not much reason to require a login every time you restart your computer. Luckily there's an easy way to make sure that Windows doesn't ask you for a password when you log on, using the netplwiz utility. Just uncheck the box that says "Users must enter a user name and password", enter your password in twice, and you won't have to login anymore.
Make Windows 7 or Vista Log On Automatically

Stop Windows Update from Automatically Restarting Your PC This is my personal pet peeve with Windows—you are right in the middle of a few dozen things, with a ton of applications open on your screen, and you come back to your computer only to find that your PC has restarted because Windows Update decided that rebooting that instant was more important than all that work you had on your screen. If you are sitting in front of your PC, you can always temporarily disable the automatic reboot, but there's another registry hack that will prevent it from happening in the first place.
Prevent Windows Update from Forcibly Rebooting Your Computer
Add Any Folder To Your Taskbar This tweak has worked on every version of Windows for a very long time, and even with the new taskbar in Windows 7, it still works perfectly. Just right-click on the taskbar, choose Toolbars –> New Toolbar, and pick the folder you'd like to add. You can make them icon-only, remove the label, or make them use large icons. You can even use this trick to add the Quick Launch folder back to Windows 7. 
Add "My Computer" to Your Windows 7 / Vista Taskbar
Add "Take Ownership" to the Context Menu If you were rocking an administrator account on Windows XP, you pretty much had access to do anything you wanted, but since Vista, Windows made it extremely difficult to change files and folders in any of the system directories. To easily solve this problem, there's a simple little registry hack that will add a "Take Ownership" item to the context menu, after which you can rename, delete, or do whatever you'd like.
Add "Take Ownership" to Explorer Right-Click Menu in Win 7 or Vista
Add Copy/Move to the Context Menu Sure, there are loads of ways to copy  or move files around in Windows, but there's one simple little registry hack that will add a "Copy To folder" and "Move To folder" option to the context menu. Once you've added them to the menu, you can pop up a dialog box that lets you easily choose a folder to move or copy the items to—it's one of those great little hacks that's been around forever, and still works in Windows 7.
Add Copy To / Move To on Windows 7 or Vista Right-Click Menu
Disable the Caps Lock Key The Caps Lock key is by far my least favorite key on the keyboard—at least the scroll lock key doesn't interfere with my typing when I hit it by accident. Thankfully it's easy enough to get rid of with a simple registry hack, or you can map any key to any key using an easy freeware utility. If you'd rather not disable it, you can instead use Caps Lock as a keyboard-friendly navigation tool or turn it into a dedicated minimize button.
Disable Caps Lock Key in Windows 7 or Vista 
Stop Losing the Sleep/Shutdown Button to Windows Update So you're rushing to finish up that TPS report so you can duck out early and avoid Lumberg asking you to work on the weekend, only to realize that Windows hijacked your Sleep/Shutdown button and is now slowly installing updates for the next twenty minutes or so. Thankfully there's another simple registry hack that will prevent Windows from changing out your regular shutdown button with the install updates variety.
Stop Windows Update from Hijacking the Sleep Button
Enable Remote Desktop Remote Desktop doesn't come with all the flavors of Windows—you can only use it if you are running the Ultimate, Pro, or Business editions. If you are using one of those versions and want an excellent way to control the PC in the other room, Remote Desktop is where it's at—in Windows 7 or Vista it will even enable Aero through the Remote Desktop session. To enable for yourself, simply head into System properties, choose Remote Settings, and then change the radio button to enable it.
Turn on Remote Desktop in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable Sticky / Filter Keys Dialogs Have you ever been playing a game, or doing something else that required pressing the Shift or Ctrl keys a bunch of times, and then had the "Do you want to turn on Sticky Keys?" question pop up on your screen? It might be a great feature for some people, but it's not useful for the rest of us—and it's really annoying. Thankfully you can disable the keyboard shortcuts entirely by heading into the Control Panel's Ease of Access center and looking under the keyboard section.
Disable the Irritating Sticky / Filter Keys Popup Dialogs

Disable Windows Explorer Click Sounds Ever noticed that every time you double-click on anything in Windows Explorer, it makes an annoying clicking sound? If you do a lot of file management, this sound can quickly drive you batty. Thankfully there's a really simple way to disable it—just head into the Sounds panel and find the item called "Start Navigation" in the list. Once you've disabled that sound, you should be finally free of the irritation. 
Turn Off Windows Explorer Click Sounds in Windows 7 or Vista
Disable User Account Control's Annoying Prompts UAC has noble intentions, but for power users who know what they're doing, they can be extremely annoying. Windows 7 makes it so much easier to get rid of those annoying prompts than Vista—you can simply head into Control Panel, find the UAC settings panel, and then drag the slider to fit the level of annoyance you feel like dealing with. If you'd rather keep UAC enabled but want to prevent the prompts for a particular application, you can always create shortcuts that bypass the UAC prompts with a simple task scheduler trick.
Disable User Account Control (UAC) the Easy Way on Win 7 or Vista
These are just a few of the many Windows tweaks that still work in Windows 7. Do you have a can't-live-without tweak that you want to still use in Windows 7? Tell us in the comments. The 20 Best Windows Tweaks that Still Work in Windows 7 [How-To Geek]
_windows_7_  Annoyances  Customization  Desktop  Feature  Hacks  Tips  Top  Tweaks  Windows  from google
october 2009 by bjourdan
Microsoft's Launch Party Video Is Surprisingly Offensive! [Parodies]
Okay, now we get the appeal of hosting a Windows 7 launch party. There's lots of f[bleep]g involved. Lots and lots of it at the skeevy white guy's party, it sounds like. Watch the clip below to see how much better you can make a corporate video by adding a few well-timed bleeps.

"Well It Turns Out That Microsoft Ad WAS A Porno" [Oh Gizmo!]
_Clips_  _Funny_  _Marketing_  _Microsoft_  _Sex_  _Videos_  _windows_7_  from google
october 2009 by stallmer
Windows 7 Transfers Your Wireless Settings Easily [Windows 7]
After discovering how easily WEP can be cracked and creating a long, secure WPA2 key, you've probably noticed it's a pain to get friends connected to your Wi-Fi network when they stop by. Windows 7 makes this process easy.
Over at the How-To Geek site (my home away from Lifehacker), guest blogger Ciprian writes up the quick and easy process of transferring your wireless network settings from your Windows 7 PC to any other machine running XP, Vista, or Windows 7. To transfer the settings for yourself, head into the Network and Sharing Center, click on Manage Wireless Networks, and then in the properties for your wireless network you'll find the link to open the wizard that will copy all your settings onto a flash drive.
Once you've got the settings backed up, you can use the bundled setupSNK.exe file on the flash drive to restore the settings onto another computer. Sure, you can always save the key to a text file, but having this feature built into the OS is very useful, especially since you don't have to mess around with wireless settings.
Easily Backup & Import Your Wireless Network Settings in Windows 7 [How-To Geek]
_windows_7_  Flash_Drive  Tips  Utilities  Wireless  wireless_network  wireless_router  from google
september 2009 by bjourdan
Disable the New Libraries Feature on Windows 7 [Windows 7]
We've referred to Windows 7's Libraries as a top thing to look forward to, and then as one of the best underhyped features—but if you really can't get used to them, you can disable it.
The new Libraries feature in Windows 7 creates what are essentially virtual folders—you can combine multiple document folders together into a single library that combines them all into a single folder, create new libraries, and access them from common file open dialogs.
It's an excellent feature that's a huge step forwards in Windows file management—but if you aren't able to get used to a new way of doing things, the Tweaking with Vishal blog has a registry hack to completely eliminate them. Simply download, extract, and double-click on the provided registry hack file, then restart your computer and you'll see that the Libraries are completely gone. There's also an uninstall registry script provided just in case.
How to Disable "Libraries" Feature in Windows 7? [Tweaking with Vishal]
_windows_7_  Explorer  File_Explorer  File_Management  Libraries  Tips  Windows_Explorer  from google
september 2009 by bjourdan

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