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What are XeTeX and LuaTeX? | The TeX FAQ
LuaTeX

LuaTeX consists of a TeX-like engine with a Lua interpreter “embedded” in it; the Lua interpreter has access to many of the data structures used for typesetting, so that the programmer may also interpolate chunks of Lua code into their (La)TeX macros, or as “call-backs” for use when the TeX-like engine does certain operations.

LuaTeX, like XeTeX, is a Unicode engine and is capable of loading system fonts. In contrast to XeTeX, the latter ability is not “built-in” to the engine itself, but is added using Lua code. This possibility to modify the behaviour of the engine at the “user” end makes it particularly powerful.

Whilst there are some (deliberate) differences between the behavior of LuaTeX and that of Knuth’s TeX (or pdfTeX), for most users, LuaTeX may be used as a drop-in replacement. For most LaTeX end users, the subtleties are transparent, with the LaTeX kernel and fontspec package providing interfaces.

ConTeXt Mark 4 (the current version) requires LuaTeX: this is again transparent to users.
latex  2310 
2 days ago by craniac
Adios, PowerPoint. This Simple Document Template Makes Meetings Shorter, Sweeter, and Smarter | Inc.com
I've written about executive summaries in the past, but here's a six-section template specifically customized for use as a briefing document for an internal meeting that's intended to drive toward a decision:

The Challenge. This defines "where we are now" and is always either a problem or an opportunity.
The Undesired Outcome. This defines "where we don't want to be"--what will happen if the problem or opportunity is not addressed.
The Desired Outcome. This defines "where we do want to be," which should obviously be better than the undesired outcome.
The Proposed Solution. This defines what must be done to avoid the undesired outcome and achieve the desired one.
The Risk Remover. Why the proposed solution is likely to succeed and unlikely to fail.
The Call to Action. The decision you want made that will put the solution into motion to achieve the desired outcome.
2310  proposal  productivity  business  meetings  communication  presentation 
5 days ago by skome
Adios, PowerPoint. This Simple Document Template Makes Meetings Shorter, Sweeter, and Smarter | Inc.com
I've written about executive summaries in the past, but here's a six-section template specifically customized for use as a briefing document for an internal meeting that's intended to drive toward a decision:

The Challenge. This defines "where we are now" and is always either a problem or an opportunity.
The Undesired Outcome. This defines "where we don't want to be"--what will happen if the problem or opportunity is not addressed.
The Desired Outcome. This defines "where we do want to be," which should obviously be better than the undesired outcome.
The Proposed Solution. This defines what must be done to avoid the undesired outcome and achieve the desired one.
The Risk Remover. Why the proposed solution is likely to succeed and unlikely to fail.
The Call to Action. The decision you want made that will put the solution into motion to achieve the desired outcome.
2310  proposal 
9 days ago by craniac
(9) Tom Sant | LinkedIn
A former college professor, standup comic, and founder of two successful firms, Dr. Tom Sant was named the world's foremost authority on winning sales proposals by the American Management Association and one of the top ten sales trainers in the world by Selling Power Magazine. He is the author of the best-selling "Persuasive Business Proposals," "The Giants of Sales," and "The Language of Success". As the founder of The Sant Corporation (now Qvidian), Tom invented the world’s first proposal automation system, which is now used by hundreds of companies around the world. Working with a wide range of clients in high tech, government contracting, professional services, banking, and many other fields, he has written over $30 billion of winning proposals. He was named one of the first ever Fellows of the Association of Proposal Management Professionals in recognition of his contributions to the field of business development and proposal writing.
2310  3000  persuasion 
9 days ago by craniac
Making the Implicit Explicit in Assessing Multimodal Composition: Continuing the Conversation: Technical Communication Quarterly: Vol 21, No 1
Challenging as it is to assess instructional videos and wikis, the assessment of digital scholarly multimedia may be the most difficult assessment challenge presented in this issue of TCQ. After all, wikis and instructional videos rely heavily on qualities of written and spoken language that we are accustomed to dealing with. Whether in print or in video, we are accustomed to identifying points at which an instruction is ambiguous or ways in which a claim does or does not measure up to standards of verbal disciplinary argument. But scholarly multimedia requires that we recognize ways in which, to use Ball's phrase, visual elements “enact” an argument. To help with this task, Ball's article “Assessing Scholarly Multimedia: A Rhetorical Genre Studies Approach,” presents a modified version of Virginia Kuhn's analytic framework and shows how it helps assess students’ efforts to create their own scholarly arguments.
oer  2310  assessment 
15 days ago by craniac
Learning Outcomes for Professional and Technical Writing Courses
The following learning objectives form the basis of successful pedagogy in this course. The goal of each assignment is for the student to demonstrate mastery of the following learning objectives:
Understand professional writing by studying management communication contexts and genres, researching contemporary business topics, analyzing quantifiable data discovered by researching, and constructing finished professional workplace documents.
Recognize, explain, and use the formal elements of specific genres of organizational communication: white papers, recommendation and analytical reports, proposals, memorandums, web pages, wikis, blogs, business letters, and promotional documents.
Understand the ethical, international, social, and professional constraints of audience, style, and content for writing situations a.) among managers or co-workers and colleagues of an organization, and b.) between organizations, or between an organization and the public.
Understand the current resources (such as search engines and databases) for locating secondary information, and also understand the strategies of effective primary data gathering.
Understand how to critically analyze data from research; incorporate it into assigned writing clearly, concisely, and logically; and attribute the source with proper citation. 
Practice the unique qualities of professional rhetoric and writing style, such as sentence conciseness, clarity, accuracy, honesty, avoiding wordiness or ambiguity, using direct order organization, readability, coherence and transitional devices.
Explore different format features in both print, multimedia and html documents, and develop document design skills.
Revise and edit effectively in all assignments, including informal media (such as email messages to the instructor).
Develop professional work habits, including those necessary for effective collaboration and cooperation with other students, instructors and Service Learning contact representatives.
2310  oer 
15 days ago by craniac
Another OER technical communication book
too cool. I should compare all of them and write a review and publish it.
oer  techcomm  2310 
26 days ago by craniac
USA-247 - Wikipedia
NROL-39 is represented by the octopus, a versatile, adaptable, and highly intelligent creature. Emblematically, enemies of the United States can be reached no matter where they choose to hide. 'Nothing is beyond our reach' defines this mission and the value it brings to our nation and the warfighters it supports, who serve valiantly all over the globe, protecting our nation.
2310 
4 weeks ago by craniac
Creative Commons — Attribution 4.0 International — CC BY 4.0
You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
for any purpose, even commercially.

This license is acceptable for Free Cultural Works.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.
oer  2310 
4 weeks ago by craniac
MeFi Mail: Message | MetaFilter
Hi,

I assume your inquiry about the availability of the Palantir manual was sincere. As a tech writer, I beg of you, do not use the Palantir manual as an example in your class. It may be a good example of technical communication, but the information it conveys, and the purpose for its existence, is evil.

There is clearly a dearth of critical thinking about social repercussions of technology in our field; we should be teaching and talking about ethics before anything else, as our society gallops toward fascism. And as tech writers we should be turning down this kind of work.

Yours,

Sheydem-tants (Amy)
ethics  2310 
5 weeks ago by craniac
A Typical Day for a Technical Writer - Technical Writing is Easy - Medium
The PM curates and prioritizes our backlog so that writers can always start working on the next story in the list. Sometimes we’ll need to reach out to a subject matter expert (SME) for more information, but we try to make sure stories at least have enough information to get started. Our backlog has a mix of self-generated work and requests from engineering teams. We host our source docs on GitHub and we get contributions from engineers and PMs who help maintain and improve the technical accuracy of our docs.
3000  2310  techcomm 
8 weeks ago by craniac

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