2017-03   529

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Why This Shepherd Loves Twitter - The Atlantic
"Tweeting is kind of an act of resistance and defiance, a way of shouting to the sometimes disinterested world that you’re stubborn, proud, and not giving in as everywhere else is turned into a clone of everywhere else."
2017-03  to-be-read  twitter 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Frank Rich: No Sympathy for the Hillbilly
Democrats need to stop trying to feel everyone’s pain, and hold on to their own anger.
2017-03  to-be-read 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
American Democracy: A Last Chance for Resistance - BillMoyers.com
The crawl toward despotism within a failed democracy is always incremental. No regime planning to utterly extinguish civil liberties advertises its intentions in advance. It pays lip service to liberty and justice while obliterating the institutions and laws that make them possible. Its opponents, including those within the establishment, make sporadic attempts to resist, but week by week, month by month, the despot and his reactionary allies methodically consolidate power. Those inside the machinery of government and the courts who assert the rule of law are purged. Critics, including the press, are attacked, ridiculed and silenced. The state is reconfigured until the edifice of tyranny is unassailable.
2017-03  to-be-read 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Why Trump’s ties to Russia would be way worse than Watergate
Never before has a US president been investigated for having ties to a foreign power. The oversight committee meanwhile – and at times the press – is acting more like a lapdog than a watchdog. And that’s just the lowlights.
2017-03  kendzior  to-be-read 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Kendzior: In Defense of Complaining | Savage Minds
This was meant to be a book review. Instead, it’s an essay about the power—and importance—of complaining.
2017-03  kendzior  to-be-read 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Keep the Arctic Wildlife Refuge Safe | Audubon
The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is an iconic American treasure—and a vital habitat for birds that migrate through all fifty states to nest here. It is home to more than 200 species of birds, along with polar bears, wolves, and nearly 200,000 caribou that raise their young in the refuge. Birds migrate from across the United States and from six continents in order to feed and reproduce in the Arctic Refuge, taking advantage of the burst of plant and insect life during the long days of the Arctic summer.



The region was first protected in 1960 by President Dwight Eisenhower. President Eisenhower had the wisdom to set aside an entire Arctic ecosystem, from the Brooks Range Mountains and surrounding forests, to wild rivers and streams, vast marshes, to the biologically-rich coastal plain that streteches to the Arctic Ocean. This area provides crucial nesting habitat for birds such as Tundra Swans and Northern Pintail.



While many areas in Alaska are already open to oil and gas drilling, oil and gas interests continue to lobby to drill in the pristine coastal plain. And unlike other areas in the Refuge, much of the refuge has never received permanent protection through a Wilderness designation from Congress, leaving it vulnerable to industrial development.
2017-03  nature  BigOil  money  power  regulation  conservation  environment 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Bill would allow Connecticut police to put weapons on drones - The Washington Post
Connecticut lawmakers are considering whether the state should become the first in the country to allow police to use drones outfitted with deadly weapons, a proposal immediately met with concern by civil rights and liberties advocates.

The bill would ban the use of weaponized drones, but exempt police.
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Former FBI agent details how Trump and Russia team up to weaponize fake news
Trump “has used Russian active measures at times, against his opponents.”
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Cyber expert drops Senate intel bombshell: Russia targets Trump with fake news because he’ll repeat it
A cybersecurity expert testified that Russian “bots” pushed their disinformation campaigns during times when President Donald Trump was likely to be on social media — and he dutifully hyped those conspiracy theories.

Clint Watts, a former FBI agent and counterterrorism instructor at West Point, explained Thursday that Trump as a presidential candidate helped Russia take active measures to interfere with the election, whether he realized it or not.
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Report: Michael Flynn Wants Immunity Before Talking with Russia-Trump Investigators | Mother Jones
The former national security advisor's lawyer says Flynn "has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it."
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Three White House officials tied to files shared with House intelligence chairman - The Washington Post
At least three senior White House officials, including the top lawyer for the National Security Council, were involved in the handling of intelligence files that were shared with the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and showed that Trump campaign officials were swept up in U.S. surveillance of foreign nationals, according to U.S. officials.

The White House role in the matter contradicts assertions by the committee’s chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), and adds to mounting concerns that the Trump administration is collaborating with the leader of the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson spends his first weeks isolated from an anxious bureaucracy - The Washington Post
Most of his interactions are with an insular circle of political aides who are new to the State Department. Many career diplomats say they still have not met him, and some have been instructed not to speak to him directly — or even make eye contact.
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird
What to expect now that Internet providers can collect and sell your Web browser history - The Washington Post
After Congress handed President Trump legislation Tuesday that would wipe away landmark privacy protections for Internet users, we received a lot of reader questions about what happens next. The legislation makes it easier for Internet providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, to collect and sell information such as your Web browsing history and app usage. But let's get into the details: You wanted to know whether the measure could help the government dig up dirt on people. You asked how to protect your privacy. And some of you even asked if it would be possible to buy up the online browsing histories of Trump or members of Congress.
2017-03 
12 weeks ago by Weaverbird

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