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Harvard University's Tanner Fountain | Garden Design
Harvard University's Tanner Fountain
A fountain at Harvard wins the 2008 ASLA Landmark Award

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Basic elements like stone and water reach us on a gut level. A sparkling fountain can mesmerize us for hours. But typical fountains, though worthy landscape features, can be problematic for institutions when it comes to maintaining them. Take the fountains of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for example. Over the years, water features were installed with the well-meaning intention of enhancing the campus. But invariably, once the chore of keeping them clean and running became a grind, maintenance workers would seek to alleviate some of their burden by breaking the bottoms, filling them with dirt and planting them. Fountain? What fountain? Look at the pretty flowers!
Garden Design Calimesa, CA Garden Design Calimesa, CA

So when Harvard president Derek Bok commissioned a new fountain, he required that it be constructed so that, indeed, it remained a fountain. The result was Tanner Fountain, a basinless arrangement that proved to be groundbreaking — so much so that it won the 2008 Landmark Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Completed in 1984, it was the first institutional project in the Landscape as Art movement, and it continues to exemplify the overlap of the two disciplines.
Garden Design Calimesa, CA Garden Design Calimesa, CA

Designed by landscape architect Peter Walker of SWA Group based in Berkeley, California, the 60-foot-diameter circle of 159 stones, placed in a loosely concentric fashion, emerges primordially from the ground, with water generated at the center by 32 nozzles.
design  art  land  +++++  nature 
10 days ago by jonippolito
How to Make a Sick Edit
[Originally from IFHT, no longer on Vimeo]
movie  recreation  fun  humor  +++++  transport 
10 days ago by jonippolito
Supreme Court rules that students grading papers OK | Texas Classroom Teachers Association
grades on students’ papers would not be covered under FERPA at least until the teacher has collected them and recorded them in his or her grade book. We limit our holding to this narrow point, and do not decide the broader question whether the grades on individual student assignments, once they are turned in to teachers, are protected by (FERPA).
education  law  sharing  evaluation  +++++ 
5 weeks ago by jonippolito
‘Guccifer 2.0’ Is Likely a Russian Government Attempt to Cover Up Its Own Hack - Motherboard
there's also a trail of evidence pointing in Russia's direction. (Both CrowdStrike and the DNC, moreover, are still pointing their fingers at Russia.)

The first, most easy to spot one, is the use of ")))" instead of a standard smile emoticon in the Guccifer 2.0 blog post. Using a single or multiple ")" instead the usual ":)" is very common for Russians, given the awkward way one needs to type the colon in a Russian keyboard.

That's not all though. The leaked documents contain metadata indicating they've been opened and processes on multiple virtual machines, as the independent cybersecurity researcher known as Pwn All The Things pointed out on Twitter on Wednesday. Some of these machines had different configurations, including one with the Cyrillic language setting and the username of "Iron Felix," referencing Felix Dzerzhinsky, the first head of the Soviet intelligence services.

The computer or virtual machine where the leakers processed the documents sent to Gawker used the Russian language setting. The same document posted on the Guccifer 2.0 blog post, however, did not.

Moreover, as someone on Twitter found, the software used during the analysis process was a cracked version of Office 2007, which, according to the Twitter user who found this, happens to be popular in Russia.

Could all these breadcrumbs have been left on purpose? Of course, but then the explanation would be that someone has done an awful lot of work to leave evidence pointing to Russia in a blog post where he or she was claiming to have nothing to do with Russia.
metadata  defect  Politics  hacking  digitalcuration  +++++ 
7 weeks ago by jonippolito
The invention and dissemination of the spacer gif: implications for the future of access and use of web archives | SpringerLink
This study looks at transparent GIFs appearing in two specific collections, Olia Lialina’s exhibit of transparent GIFs from the Geocities archive and the UK Web Archive. These two collections make up a small percentage of content in web archives throughout the world, web archives which have had varying crawl practices over time (Milliganet al. 2016). We took a look at the history of seven transparent GIFs in data resulting from harvesting done by the UK Web Archiving Team. We have not looked at the complete history of all single-pixel GIFs as they appeared on the live web over time (Brügger 2017).

With appropriate technical infrastructure, this same study could be completed on any organization’s web archives. Since each one of these entities will have different crawl practices, multiple web archiving initiatives collecting the same websites is invaluable to researchers studying the web. As the crawl becomes more comprehensive, we can begin to see how the findings of case studies like these are influenced by crawling practices (crawl frequency, crawl depth, deduplication, etc.) and whether the findings are indicative of web usage trends throughout time. Decoupling these concepts is essential for an understanding of the practice of web archiving and the history of the web, respectively, and can only be done through multiple archives.

When we approach each institution’s web archives as corpora it becomes increasingly clear that there is significant value in having a range of organizations engaged in web archiving Ideally, they are engaging in these practices with a range of tools. The trends in the appearance of these files raise all kinds of questions. For instance, what conclusions do we reach when we apply similar methods to different kinds of files? In other words, what do trends in identical copies of files themselves tell about the movement, dissemination, and popularity of practices and approaches? There is informational content in the files, but the history of the appearance of a given file in a given place also has potential informational value.
preservation  digitalcuration  network  Web  HTML  history  +++++  socialmemory 
9 weeks ago by jonippolito
AI and Machine Learning Invade a New York Art Gallery - The Atlantic
it’s odd to list AICAN as a collaborator—painters credit pigment as a medium, not as a partner. Even the most committed digital artists don’t present the tools of their own inventions that way; when they do, it’s only after years, or even decades, of ongoing use and refinement.

But Elgammal insists that the move is justified because the machine produces unexpected results. “A camera is a tool—a mechanical device—but it’s not creative,” he said. “Using a tool is an unfair term for AICAN. It’s the first time in history that a tool has had some kind of creativity, that it can surprise you.” Casey Reas, a digital artist who co-designed the popular visual-arts-oriented coding platform Processing, which he uses to create some of his fine art, isn’t convinced. “The artist should claim responsibility over the work rather than to cede that agency to the tool or the system they create,” he told me.
Three AICAN-generated prints on display at the HG Contemporary Gallery. (Ian Bogost)

Elgammal’s financial interest in AICAN might explain his insistence on foregrounding its role. Unlike a specialized print-making technique or even the Processing coding environment, AICAN isn’t just a device that Elgammal created. It’s also a commercial enterprise....

Elgammal has already spun off a company, Artrendex, that provides “artificial-intelligence innovations for the art market.” One of them offers provenance authentication for artworks; another can suggest works a viewer or collector might appreciate based on an existing collection; another, a system for cataloging images by visual properties and not just by metadata, has been licensed by the Barnes Foundation to drive its collection-browsing website.
art  artificialintelligence  +++++ 
9 weeks ago by jonippolito
Microsoft just booted up the first “DNA drive” for storing data - MIT Technology Review
Microsoft has been working toward a photocopier-size device that would replace data centers by storing files, movies, and documents in DNA strands, which can pack in information at mind-boggling density.

According to Microsoft, all the information stored in a warehouse-size data center would fit into a set of Yahztee dice, were it written in DNA.

Demo device: So far, DNA data storage has been carried out by hand in the lab. But now researchers at the University of Washington who are working with the software giant say they created a machine that converts electronic bits to DNA and back without a person involved.

The gadget, made from about $10,000 in parts, uses glass bottles of chemicals to build DNA strands, and a tiny sequencing machine from Oxford Nanopore to read them out again.

Still limited: According to a publication on March 21 in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, the team was able to store and retrieve just a single word—“hello”—or five bytes of data. What’s more, the process took 21 hours, mostly because of the slow chemical reactions involved in writing DNA.

While the team considered that a success for their prototype, a commercially useful DNA storage system would have to store data millions of times faster.

Why now? It’s a good time for companies involved in DNA storage to show off their stuff. The National Intelligence Agency’s IARPA program is getting ready to hand out tens of millions toward radical new molecular information storage schemes.
storage  biotech  preservation  digitalcuration  hardware  life  +++++ 
11 weeks ago by jonippolito
Declining performance of master athletes: silhouettes of the trajectory of healthy human ageing? - Lazarus - 2017 - The Journal of Physiology - Wiley Online Library
[Records decline linearly until about 80 or 90 years old] Sedentariness has been shown to alter the profiles of nearly all physiological indices and using the values of these indices to construct models of ageing will be erroneous. For example, the widespread theories of mitochondrial dysfunction or telomere lengths being linked to inherent human ageing is likely based on values of these indices being obtained from participants whose physiology is already compromised by the effects of inactivity or stress (Werner et al. 2008; Peterson et al. 2012). The free radical theory of ageing also deserves testing in subjects who are lifelong vigorous exercisers (Beckman & Ames, 1998). These theories are best described as hypotheses linking physiological systems damaged by inactivity to incipient disease. One example in support of this concept is the study by Lanza et al. (2008) who tested the effects of exercise on two physiological processes that are widely reported to be due to ageing, i.e. reduced insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial dysfunction.
body  defect  success  study  time  +++++ 
12 weeks ago by jonippolito
JavaScript Overtakes Java As Most Popular Programming Language - Slashdot
Today, HackerRank released the 2019 edition of its annual Developer Skills Report (PDF), surveying over 71,000 software developers from more than 100 countries. Every single industry requires software developers, meaning competition for technical talent is fierce. The idea here is to help everyone from CEOs and executives to hiring managers and recruiters understand the developers they're pursuing. We've put together a quick video to summarize the results. HackerRank asked developers which programming languages they knew and which ones they wanted to learn. Seventy-three percent of developers said they knew JavaScript in 2018, up from 66 percent in 2017. JavaScript was 2018's most well-known language, compared to Java in 2017.
Javascript  Java  study  code  +++++ 
march 2019 by jonippolito
Say Goodbye To Cocktails And Hello To The Vocktail: A Virtual Cocktail
Within the device, there are three scent cartridges and three micro air-pumps which provide the aroma of the drink which interacts with our smell and alters our perception of the taste of the beverage. The ‘smell chambers’, as the authors call it, are placed beneath the glass and takes about one second for the smell from the chamber to reach the drinker. On top of that, there are LEDs that are used to vary the color of the drink. And finally, the system also contains two silver electrodes on the rim of the ‘cup’ which stimulate the tongue in order to give salty, bitter or sweet tastes whilst consuming the drink. Different magnitudes of current are used to simulate the tongue for these flavors: 180 microamps for a sour taste, 40 microamps for a salty taste and then 80 microamps for a bitter taste.

The vocktail contains parts that can alter the color, taste and smell of your cocktail. An app that accompanies the device helps you alter these characteristics.MM 17/Digital Trends/Ranasinghe

Work carried out by Nimesha Ranasinghe and his team confirmed that combined stimulation of smell, sight and taste altered the perceived taste of the beverage, heightened these sensory responses, and enhanced the flavor and overall experience of the drink. The drink is also accompanied with an app that allows you to customize your vocktail by choosing the color of your drink and virtual flavors by altering each of the stimuli via Bluetooth. You can also share your favorite drink with your friends or save it on the app for next time.
research  maine  food  hardware  data  +++++  press 
march 2019 by jonippolito
How Do We Conserve and Restore Computer-Based Art in a Changing Technological Environment?
A team led by [NYU Courant prof Deena] Engel and Joanna Phillips, former senior conservator of time-based media at the Guggenheim Museum, and including conservation fellow Jonathan Farbowitz and Lena Stringari, deputy director and chief conservator at the Guggenheim Museum, explore and implement both technical and theoretical approaches to the treatment and restoration of software-based art.

In doing so, they not only strive to maintain the functionality and appeal of the original works, but also follow the ethical principles that guide conservation of traditional artwork, such as sculptures and paintings. Specifically, Engel and Phillips adhere to the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works’ Code of Ethics, Guidelines for Practice, and Commentaries, applying these standards to artistic creations that rely on software as a medium.

“For example, if we migrate a work of software-based art from an obsolete programming environment to a current one, our selection and programming decisions in the new programming language and environment are informed in part by evaluating the artistic goals of the medium first used,” explains Engel. “We strive to maintain respect for the artist's coding style and approach in our restoration.”

So far, Phillips and Engel have completed two restorations of on-line artworks at the museum: Cheang’s Brandon (restored in 2016-2017) and Simon’s Unfolding Object (restored in 2018)....

The CCBA team, in dialogue with the artist, analyzed and documented the artwork’s original source code and aesthetic and functional behaviors before identifying a treatment strategy. The team determined that a migration from the obsolete Java applet code to the contemporary programming language JavaScript was necessary. In place of a complete rewriting of the code, a treatment that art conservators would deem invasive, the CCBA team developed a new migration strategy more in line with contemporary conservation ethics, “code resituation,” which preserves as much of the original source code as possible.
Javascript  Java  variablemedia  @g  museum  digitalcuration  art  migration  preservation  +++++ 
march 2019 by jonippolito
Is This Permanence: Symposium Recap and Recordings – NDSR Art
[Includes correct YouTube link to keynote] The symposium, ‘Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives’ was held on Friday, May 11 and welcomed nearly 200 people to the YCBA lecture hall and over 275 livestream viewers.

The symposium was an offshoot of my project in the Institutional Archives and came about last fall after my mentor, Rachel Chatalbash and I talked about our shared interest in the overlaps between fine arts, archives, and artists’ records; we decided it would be useful and interesting to bring together a variety of voices to discuss the topic as it relates to born-digital media and documentation within artists’ archives.

The symposium was planned over the next several months and featured 13 speakers who delivered talks on a broad range of related cases and topics that highlight digital preservation challenges affecting the stewardship of artists’ archives and artworks, both in and out institutional contexts. The speakers traveled from across the US, Canada, and the UK to discuss their work and insights regarding digital preservation and artists’ archives.

Jon Ippolito’s keynote lecture, Your Archival Format Will Not Save You, confronts commonly held notions in the archives regarding preservation and offers a different perspective on how born-digital materials should be stewarded by looking outside the academy for solutions to shared digital challenges.
@i  variablemedia  digitalcuration  preservation  presentation  press  +++++ 
february 2019 by jonippolito
(7) Is This Permanence? | Your Archival Format Will Not Save You - YouTube
UMaineDigCuration
Published on Jun 11, 2018
Streamed live from the Yale Center for British Art on May 11, 2018

Jon Ippolito, Professor and Program Coordinator of New Media, Co-director of the Still Water Lab, and Director of the Digital Curation Program, University of Maine

From the 1700s forward, solander boxes, flat files, and climate-controlled vaults were the mainstays of an artist’s archive. The last fifty years have seen these analog bulwarks against decay displaced by a successive wave of digital counterparts, from boxes of videotapes to shelves of hard drives to cloud storage subscriptions. To cope with this rotating panoply of obsolescing hardware, professional archivists have increasingly focused on saving bits instead of boxes, digitizing analog art materials and extracting bits from floppy drives and CD-ROMs to save them in so-called archival formats.

Each archival format is designed to be universal, self-contained, and platform independent, distilling images, movies, and websites into an immaterial medium free of the dependencies that plague specific hardware like Dell, DAT, or Digibeta. Sprinkle some metadata and funding on archival files, and the original artworks, or ephemera, are supposed to spring back to life for exhibition and/or scholarly review.

This keynote aims to debunk this pipe dream, considering specific cases where today’s archival formats completely fail to produce their intended benefit. Drawing on themes from the book "Re-collection: Art, New Media, and Social Memory" (re-collection.net), the talk will conclude with alternative strategies that are expansive and creative enough to capture the vibrancy that makes the art of our era worth preserving in the first place.

Recorded on location:
Yale Center for British Art
Lecture Hall
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510
@i  variablemedia  digitalcuration  preservation  presentation  press  +++++ 
february 2019 by jonippolito
Symposium | Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives | Yale Center for British Art
Keynote Lecture

Your Archival Format Will Not Save You
Friday, May 11, 2018, 3:30 pm

Jon Ippolito, Professor and Program Coordinator of New Media, Co-director of the Still Water Lab, and Director of the Digital Curation Program, University of Maine

From the 1700s forward, solander boxes, flat files, and climate-controlled vaults were the mainstays of an artist’s archive. The last fifty years have seen these analog bulwarks against decay displaced by a successive wave of digital counterparts, from boxes of videotapes to shelves of hard drives to cloud storage subscriptions. To cope with this rotating panoply of obsolescing hardware, professional archivists have increasingly focused on saving bits instead of boxes, digitizing analog art materials, and extracting bits from floppy drives and CD-ROMs to save them in so-called archival formats.

Each archival format is designed to be universal, self-contained, and platform independent, distilling images, movies, and websites into an immaterial medium free of the dependencies that plague specific hardware like Dell, DAT, or Digibeta. Sprinkle some metadata and funding on archival files, and the original artworks, or ephemera, are supposed to spring back to life for exhibition and/or scholarly review.

This keynote will aim to debunk this pipe dream, considering specific cases where today’s archival formats completely fail to produce their intended benefit. Drawing on themes from the book Re-collection: Art, New Media, and Social Memory (http://re-collection.net (link is external)), the talk will conclude with alternative strategies that are expansive and creative enough to capture the vibrancy that makes the art of our era worth preserving in the first place.
@i  variablemedia  digitalcuration  preservation  presentation  press  +++++ 
february 2019 by jonippolito
[Euan Cochran: visual demonstration of migration failures in word processors] Visual Rendering Matters - Archives New Zealand. Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga
A set of equations was included in the WordStar file illustrated in Figures 32, 33 and 34. When rendered in all other tested environments including Microsoft Word 5.5 for MS-DOS (Figure 33) and LibreOffice Writer 3.3.0 (Figure 34) the meaning or purpose of the numbers above the equation in the examples was not apparent. When rendered in the control WordStar version 7 environment it becomes clear that the numbers above the equation in the examples are intended to be interpreted as exponents (or “powers” e.g “x²”). This meaning was presumably captured in the control environment by the creator utilizing the font spacing and text spacing functionality to position the exponents above the relevant positions of the equation on the line below.
variablemedia  digitalcuration  migration  defect  +++++  visual  study 
february 2019 by jonippolito
[Pip Laurenson and Vivian Saaze] Performativity in the Gallery: Staging Interactive Encounters - collecting_performance-based_art_new_cha.pdf
In this chapter we have shown that it is not the problem of non-materiality that currently represents the greatest challenge for museums in collect-ing performance, but of maintaining – conceived of as a process of active engagement – the networks which support the work. As this increasing dependency on social and political context, people, resources, and other transitory circumstances outside the museum goes against the museum’s ten-dency of containment and control, this shift may cause a certain uneasiness and raises new questions. What, for example, does it mean for a museum to depend on external memory holders to be able to re-execute a work from its own collection? How does the museum navigate the reality of this expanded notion of (distributed) responsibility?
variablemedia  art  performance  museum  +++++ 
february 2019 by jonippolito

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