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10 days ago by zvi
How Mars Will Be Policed - The Atlantic
Consider the basic science of crime-scene analysis. In the dry, freezer-like air and extreme solar exposure of Mars, DNA will age differently than it does on Earth. Blood from blunt-trauma and stab wounds will produce dramatically new spatter patterns in the planet’s low gravity. Electrostatic charge will give a new kind of evidentiary value to dust found clinging to the exteriors of space suits and nearby surfaces. Even radiocarbon dating will be different on Mars, Darwent reminded me, due to the planet’s atmospheric chemistry, making it difficult to date older crime scenes.
10 days ago by spectrevision
Exclusive: Spotify CEO Daniel Ek on Apple, Facebook, Netflix–and the future
Recommender The apps, books, movies, music, TV shows, and art are inspiring our some of the most creative people in business this month Strong Female Lead The…
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10 days ago by wenxin
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Ask yourself if you really believe Dianne Feinstein would have sat on this for two months if she thought it was cre…
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10 days ago by ewerickson
ordinary, everyday things - pdameron - James Bond (Craig movies) [Archive of Our Own]
It is fourteen years after the Battle of Hogwarts that he finds himself at the helm of MI6’s Q Branch, 29 and thrilled and terrified and completely alone.

(In which everything is the same except Q and Bond are both wizards and think the other is a muggle.)
ff  jamesbond  00Q  X-Over/Fusion  <3  au 
10 days ago by the24thkey
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Interesting fact: Ian Buruma was born in The Hague which is where he should be tried for the crime against humanity…
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NEXUS 6 Replicants were superior in strength and agility, and at least equal in intelligence, to the engineers who…
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... My point is the burden - in these cases - has not been the same for the women than it has been for the men, car…
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This afternoon at I'm giving a talk called "The introduction to you've been missing..."

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10 days ago by hoodwink73
How the Weather Channel Made That Insane Hurricane Florence Storm Surge Animation | WIRED
Brian Barrett, writing for Wired:

On one level, yes, the visualization literally just shows what three, six, and nine feet of water looks like. But it’s showing that in a context most people have never experienced. It fills in the gaps of your imagination, and hopefully underscores for anyone in a flood zone all the reasons they should not be.

Perfect example of how showing something can be tremendously more effective than merely saying something.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
10 days ago by rufous
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Аппл трясётся в ужасе
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10 days ago by andyk74
'Ayahuasca is changing global environmental consciousness'
Interview with US scientist Dennis McKenna on powerful Amazon hallucinogen, plant intelligence and environmental crises
Ayahuasca, as it has come to be known internationally, is a plant medicine that has been used in the Amazon for centuries for healing and spiritual purposes. Renowned for the often extraordinary visions it induces - not to mention the deep vomiting - it is made from an Amazonian vine known to western science as Banisteriopsis caapi and usually at least one other plant.

Over the last 25 years or so ayahuasca has gone global, with many 1000s of people travelling to Peru and other South American countries to drink it, and expert healers - curanderos, shamans, ayahuasqueros, maestros - travelling abroad to hold ceremonies. Many drink ayahuasca because they’re looking for healing, some are just curious, some mistake it for a recreational “drug.”

One of ayahuasca’s pioneer scientific researchers is Dennis McKenna, a US ethnopharmacologist and younger brother of the legendary ethnobotanist and author Terence. Some years ago, in an article titled “Ayahuasca and Human Destiny” published in the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, McKenna emphasised the contribution ayahuasca can make to physical and spiritual healing - “if it is ever afforded its rightful place in medical practice” - and addressing potential environmental catastrophe.

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“[Ayahuasca is] the conduit to a body of profoundly ancient genetic and evolutionary wisdom that has long abided in the cosmologies of the indigenous peoples of the Amazon who have guarded and protected this knowledge for millennia, who learned long ago that the human role is not to be the master of nature, but its stewards,” McKenna wrote. “Our destiny, if we are to survive, is to nurture nature and to learn from it how to nurture ourselves and our fellow beings. This is the lesson that we can learn from ayahuasca, if only we pay attention.”

Below are edited excerpts from an interview between McKenna, in the US, and the Guardian, in Iquitos, a city in Peru’s Amazon which the scientist calls the “epicentre” of the “global ayahuasca movement”:

DM: What can [ayahuasca] do for the environmental movement? I think a lot of people, especially if they come to South America, come away with a really renewed appreciation for our connection to and the importance of nature. I think that ayahuasca is a catalytic influence in changing global environmental consciousness, which is something that’s got to happen if we’re going to get out of the mess we’re in. The main challenge we have as a species is - getting on the soap-box for a minute - we have forgotten our connection to nature. We’ve come to the conclusion that we own nature, it exists for us to exploit, and we’re busy doing that. We’re destroying it in the process. We’re destabilising all of these global mechanisms that keep the biosphere habitable by life. I think ayahuasca is waking up a lot of people and reminding them that, “No, that’s not the way it is. You monkeys are not running the show. The plants are running the show, by sustaining life on earth, if nothing else.” There needs to be a global shift of consciousness. People need to understand this before they can really begin to change, and so in that sense I think ayahuasca is an ambassador from the community of species. The message is basically, “Wake up, you monkeys! You’re wrecking the place!” It’s very important and interesting that so many people come away with this strong message that they’ve really been moved and touched by something that they feel is an intelligent entity - an intelligent representative of the natural world.

Sina Ramirez Rios, a Shipibo curandero, ‘singing’ to ayahuasca before a ceremony near Pucallpa in Peru’s Amazon.
Sina Ramirez Rios, a Shipibo curandero singing to ayahuasca before a ceremony near Pucallpa in Peru’s Amazon. Photograph: Emilie Lescale
DH: Why is that? Why does it make clear to people our connection to nature? How does it do that? Because it teaches us that the plants and trees are alive, in a sense, and are intelligent and sentient?

DM: I don’t think there is a scientific answer. It’s more like a philosophical answer, or a spiritual answer. This is the challenge of our time: we have separated ourselves from nature and we really need to re-understand that relationship, and as part of the community of species, which we are - we may deny it, we may forget it, but we are part of the community of species. And I think that the community of species is concerned about this problematic primate that they have let loose on the planet. As a species, we are simultaneously the most dangerous thing that has appeared in the course of evolutionary time and we’re also the most promising. Indigenous people have this perspective that [ayahuasca and other plants] are teachers. They exist to give us guidance and wisdom - and I believe that, actually. [Indigenous people] have been the stewards of the plants, the stewards of this knowledge, but I think that now things are getting desperate on a global scale in terms of the environmental catastrophes that are looming. I think there’s a sense in the community of species we’ve got to step up the game and these are their tools to contact human beings and basically say, “Pay attention because you need to re-understand your relationship to nature”, and once that’s understood then you have to start making changes. I think one of the challenges of our species - one of our problems - is that we’re very, very clever. We can do amazing things with our big brains and our opposable thumbs and our ability to use and create technology. No doubt that we’re clever. The problem is we’re not wise - and that’s the whole thing. I think the message from ayahuasca and all these other teacher plants is, “Wise up.” Literally: “Get wise.” So that we can use the technologies we’ve invented in a way that supports and sustains life, rather than threatens life. That’s really the message. It’s a profound message, but it’s a simple one.

The Banisteriopsis caapi vine, the key ingredient to ayahuasca, known by numerous different names throughout the Amazon.
The Banisteriopsis caapi vine, the key ingredient to ayahuasca, known by numerous different names throughout the Amazon. Photograph: Emilie Lescale
DH: Do you feel Peru is the centre of what you call the “global ayahuasca movement”, or is it more Brazil?

DM: I think it’s Peru. In terms of its interfacing with the West, or Western culture, in Brazil, where you find it is through churches [like the Uniao do Vegetal], which have adopted ayahuasca as their sacrament. I don’t think there’s a big ayahuasca tourism industry in Brazil. It may be happening, but Iquitos is definitely the epicentre. People have been coming there regularly since about 1995 and it has grown a lot.

DH: Do you think more clinical studies [on ayahuasca] need to be done? That that would be positive for ayahuasca in general?

DM: I don’t need clinical studies to convince me ayahuasca is good medicine, that it’s helping people, but you can publish them [and it’s] a good way to convince skeptical colleagues in biomedicine, rather than just some guy raving about how great it is. . . This also grades over into some ethical issues. There are multiple ones. This is something that exists in the context of traditional medicine. It has already, in a certain way, been co-opted by the West through the ayahuasca tourism phenomenon and so on. Is it ethical to try and take a medicine like this and stuff it into a biomedical research structure? Is that the right way to approach it? I’m not saying that it is and I’m not saying that it isn’t. I just think that we have to be clear that there are aspects here of taking something out of its traditional context. Can it be used that effectively in biomedicine, or do you need the ceremonial ambience? It goes back to these hoary principles of setting. Which are very important. Does it have to be traditional? I don’t think so, but you could say, “Well, why not?” Because this is a Peruvian patrimony. Peru has declared ayahuasca a national patrimony, and you could say, “Well, if you’re going to develop therapeutic protocols and programs around ayahuasca, why not do them in Peru?” You’re not taking it away from anybody. You’re actually creating opportunities for Peruvian doctors, scientists and curanderos to work together to develop therapies that can help people - essentially taking a page out of the idea of medical tourism. Tourists are going to come to take ayahuasca for psycho-spiritual reasons. Why can’t they come and take it for medical reasons? That’s just an idea.

Miguel Ochavano Uquia, a Shipibo maestro working with ayahuasca at the Temple of the Way of Light near Iquitos in Peru’s Amazon.
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Miguel Ochavano Uquia, a Shipibo maestro working with ayahuasca at the Temple of the Way of Light near Iquitos in Peru’s Amazon. Photograph: Temple of the Way of Light
DH: “Medical tourism.” Have you heard that term used by anyone else [regarding ayahuasca]?

DM: Medical tourism is kind of a buzz word now, especially in the States because of the crazy cost structure of so many medical procedures. . . Ayahuasca therapy is not something you can get [here], at least, not legally, so if you want to access it you can go to South America. In that sense it’s medical tourism. . . I think the ayahuasca tourism thing is definitely a two-edged sword. It’s having a lot of negative impacts on indigenous communities, but at the same time it’s benefitting a lot of people and, in some ways, keeping the tradition alive. But it’s also changing that tradition, as people start to cater to Western tastes and needs. So what needs to develop, I think, is some kind of a fusion of traditional and medical practices that takes the best from both and creates some kind … [more]
Ayahuasca  DennisMcKenna  Iquitos  Peru 
10 days ago by juandante
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The 100% Correct Way to Split Your Chunks with Webpack: (Know what file-splitting strategy…
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The 100% correct way to split your chunks with Webpack
The 100% Correct Way to Split Your Chunks with Webpack: (Know what file-splitting strategy…
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Look at this amazing project! "AU: Alternate University is a fanfiction-inspired collaboration which imagines an al…
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RT : 2 billion people did not die on Alderaan. In fact, it's definitely still there. Trust us. The Rebellion are reporti…
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I love to see the consequences of my designs. I’m always very sad and even, see it as a failure if I’m not there to…
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Favorite tweet:

AND WITHOUT FURTHER ADO, I GIVE YOU, SCOTT WAMPLER: https://t.co/xjZ7BmhrSe

— Ash Crossan (@AshCrossan) September 14, 2018
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10 days ago by Ryanvlower
ArtStation - Sylvain Sarrailh
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Portfolio updates summary : https://t.co/31W9EYPP6j
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RT : Basically yes, if you have a tip: ronan_farrow.com.
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News - Now Available on Steam - Shadow of the Tomb Raider
Experience Lara Croft’s defining moment as she becomes the Tomb Raider. In Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Lara must master a deadly jungle, overcome terrifying tombs, and persevere through her darkest hour. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  steam  rss  news  feed 
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*pusha t voice* you are dating a child
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*pusha t voice* you are dating a child
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10 days ago by marks
Untitled (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/us/hurricane-categories.html)
Is It a Category 2, 3 or 5? How Florence and Other Hurricanes Are Classified
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The demon appeared in the pentagram, studied the lines and glyphs, and smiled. "You made an error. I'm unbound."
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The demon appeared in the pentagram, studied the lines and glyphs, and smiled. "You made an error. I'm unbound."
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The demon appeared in the pentagram, studied the lines and glyphs, and smiled. "You made an error. I'm unbound."
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10 days ago by briantrice
How the Weather Channel Made That Insane Hurricane Florence Storm Surge Animation | WIRED
from Daring Fireball

Brian Barrett, writing for Wired:

On one level, yes, the visualization literally just shows what three, six, and nine feet of water looks like. But it’s showing that in a context most people have never experienced. It fills in the gaps of your imagination, and hopefully underscores for anyone in a flood zone all the reasons they should not be.

Perfect example of how showing something can be tremendously more effective than merely saying something.

 ★ 
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no one asked but brunette skull HATH RETURNED
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Untitled (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/12/us/hurricane-hazel-florence.html)
How Hurricane Hazel Hit North Carolina With a Destructive Punch in 1954
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Meanwhile, in , civil engineers have designed a winding road to increase traffic volume, improve sa…
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