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Confirmed to me over lunch by one today.
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by ngranati
Twitter
Norton did me and Homer proud with the paperback. It’s lighter, cheaper, more travel-friendly, but also very aesthe…
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by dalcrose
Customizing the Infograph face on Apple Watch Series 4 - 9to5Mac
Zac Hall, writing at 9to5Mac:

Infograph can show up to eight complications, but that doesn’t mean it must — even if the default version is fully loaded. For me, stripping Infograph down to just the clock is a great starting place.

This requires a lot of Digital Crown scrolling on the Apple Watch to set each complication slot to empty and may be faster on the Watch app for iPhone. The end result is a simple and attractive clock without all of the noise of complications recommended for you.

I love this advice — strip it down to nothing and start adding complications. Hall has some great tips on third-party corner complications for Infograph. (You wouldn’t think I’d need to worry about humidity in Philadelphia in October, but it’s been muggy as hell all this week.)

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
10 days ago by rufous
In 1979, a chain email about science fiction spawned the modern internet.
Adapted from LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media by P. W. Singer and Emerson T. Brooking. Out now from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. More at likewarbook.com.
Archive  Pocket  feedly  ifttt 
10 days ago by brokenrhino
Twitter
A good round-up for those who can’t be here with us.
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by kerry_dc
Churnalism, Cultural (Inter)Mediation and Sourcing in Cultural Journalism: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 14
Taking a point of departure in theories about cultural (inter)mediation, this article provides a theoretical framework for explaining the pervasion of churnalism within the specialised beat of cultural journalism. Compared to other types of journalists, cultural journalists are “journalists with a difference”, since they are closely intertwined with sources, and public relations subsidies are “structurally embedded” in the beat’s professional rationales. This has intensified with the professionalisation of the culture industries’ media management during the past decades, prompting continuous critique of cultural journalists for not conforming to journalism’s norms of sourcing. However, such critical claims are typically based on the conventional ideologies of Western journalism and often sidestep the distinct nature of this particular beat. These theoretical arguments are backed by a case study of the interplay of the publishing industry and the Danish press in relation to the publicising of the fourth Millennium book in 2015, a sequel to deceased author Stieg Larsson’s successful trilogy from the mid-2000s. This case exemplifies cultural journalism’s inclination towards “churnalism”, and how churnalism may, in fact, comply with the beat’s professional logics. However, it also shows that churnalism can spark critical meta-reflections among journalists on the interplay of the culture industries and the press.
Research  sources  culture  arts  specj 
10 days ago by paulbradshaw
Twitter
New piece up wherein I go through five years of New York Times Best Seller lists and wonder if litera…
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by miaeaton
Twitter
RT : It’s not about ads. It’s not about subscriptions. It’s not about new models vs. old models. It’s not about truth. I…
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by AramZS
Networking and Political Alignment as Strategies to Control the News: Interaction between journalists and politicians: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 14
Political coverage is strongly influenced by interactions between journalists and political actors. Especially for political actors, these interactions present an opportunity to increase their influence on the news. However, what strategies political actors use in their attempts to steer political journalists when exchanging with them has not been studied comprehensively and on a broad basis. Furthermore, some studies suggest that interactions are dominated by political actors, while others conclude that journalists are at least equally influential. Building on extant research, we first draw an inventory of strategies used by political actors in their exchanges with journalists and investigate their importance based on a mixed-methods study. Our study was conducted in Austria and included a full sample of N = 173 political journalists surveyed with a standardized instrument, and open interviews with 10 additional journalists and 10 political actors. Results show that politicians build political alliances, network with specific journalists, and use intimidation as strategies to control the interactions. In the survey, journalists mentioned basing exchanges on political alignment as the most important strategy. While this strategy indeed helps politicians to control coverage, networking strategies benefit journalists.
Research  sources  networks 
10 days ago by paulbradshaw
Twitter
RT : Can anyone help with this? 👇
from twitter
10 days ago by dermotcasey
Twitter
I love my endocrinologist. I love her office, They fill my prescriptions upon request from my pharmacy SUPER prompt…
from twitter
10 days ago by Iko
(429) https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1048211552728485889
It is exciting to read about data team's efforts and contribution towards humanitarian response in…
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10 days ago by rukku
Young People, Class and the News: Distinction, socialization and moral sentiments: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 14
Journalism studies almost exclusively rely on a “sociology of integration” perspective when theorizing the social function of journalism. Focus is put on if and how journalism facilitates democratic processes, encourages civic engagement and strengthens the sense of community. In providing an alternative view, this study mobilizes the cultural sociology of Pierre Bourdieu—a “sociologist of conflict”—in order to study how young people’s conditions of existence have given rise to vastly different orientations towards news and the normative order surrounding journalism. Based on focus group interviews with young people in Brazil and Sweden, the study shows that socialization into the world of news in the family and in school generates class-distinctive news orientations. The world of news is a site where social groups draw moral and cultural boundaries against each other. Since different social groups monopolize completely different news practices and preferences, they work to legitimate social differences. As such, the findings challenge common notions of news as creating the “healthy citizen”, and that news media provide spaces for the practice of civility and citizenship.
Research  class  consumption 
10 days ago by paulbradshaw
Twitter
Oh shoot. I probably should have provided a link to the book when I talked about sharing it, huh?…
from twitter
10 days ago by grigs
Twitter
Musiques classique et métal: plein de points communs, un super plateau, une chouette émission et, désormais, une dé…
from twitter
10 days ago by bperrier
Twitter
. is heading your way, ! Come connect with admissions representatives on Oct 7 to hear about our…
Paris  from twitter_favs
10 days ago by Vince
Twitter
Who are the key and senators that could influence the vote? polit…
Kavanaugh  from twitter_favs
10 days ago by andriak
Twitter
It's the weekend so let's see that glass half-full.
Happy Friday!
from twitter
10 days ago by edouard
Content Aggregation 2018 Guide Part II: Best tools, apps, websites & platforms
Content Aggregation Complete 2018 Guide (Definition, Tools, Examples): Part II
inoreader  spike 
10 days ago by edan
Bloomberg - Are you a robot?
A Former Obama Operative Built a New Anti-Republican Attack Machine - Bloomberg
hardball  from twitter
10 days ago by Cfulwood
Twitter
If Flake, Collins, & Murkowski Are Committed to 1st Principles, They'll Confirm
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from twitter
10 days ago by ewerickson
Stopping Fake News: The work practices of peer-to-peer counter propaganda: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 14
When faced with a state-sponsored fake news campaign propagated over social media, in a process we dub “peer-to-peer propaganda,” a group of volunteer Ukrainian journalistic activists turned fact checking into a counter-propaganda weapon. We document the history of StopFake, describe its work practices, and situate them within the literatures on fact checking and online news practices. Our study of its work practices shows that StopFake employs the online media monitoring characteristic of modern journalism, but rather than imitating new stories it applies media literacy techniques to screen out fake news and inhibit its spread. StopFake evaluates news stories for signs of falsified evidence, such as manipulated or misrepresented images and quotes, whereas traditional fact-checking sites evaluate nuanced political claims but assume the accuracy of reporting. Drawing on work from science studies, we argue that attention of this kind to social processes demonstrates that scholars can acknowledge that narratives are socially constructed without having to treat all narratives as interchangeable.
factchecking  Research  verification  fakenews  propaganda  ukraine 
10 days ago by paulbradshaw
Twitter
"Respect for nature is inseparable from respect for all beings, including the human. It is impossible to cultivate…
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by brozena
Twitter
Scared about making the jump to ? 😱 Save your fear for that haunted house visit this weekend, becaus…
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10 days ago by dalcrose
Twitter
Republicans say the F.B.I. investigation into Brett Kavanaugh reveals nothing new. Democrats say it was specificall…
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by dalcrose
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